tolaini test

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Laboratory Technician, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Brooklyn Park, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Manufacturing Supervisor with a pharmaceutical company located in Brooklyn Park, MN.

Reference:

SC.ZH.28840

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Statistics, United Kingdom, Not Applicable
Location:

London, England

Description

A leading and global consulting company, providing services and technology solutions, is currently recruiting a Senior Statistician to join their team based in London.

Reference:

28825

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Statistics, Switzerland, Not Applicable
Location:

Bern, Switzerland

Description

An exciting biopharmaceutical company is looking for a Senior Biostatistics Manager to join their Research team in Switzerland.

Reference:

28832

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Contract Research Organisation (CRO), Permanent, Statistics, Italy, Not Applicable
Location:

Milan (province), Italy

Description

A leading Contract Research Organisation is currently recruiting a Senior Statistician to join their team across Europe.

Reference:

28833

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Biological Sciences, Bioprocessing, Molecular Biology, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Worcester, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Biologist with a biopharmaceutical company located in Worcester, MA.

Reference:

SC.NR.28811

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Product Vigilance, PV Manager, PV Officer/Associate, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Drug Safety Lead with a pharmaceutical company located in Cambridge, MA.

Reference:

DS.NR.28810

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Bioprocessing, Laboratory Technician, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

San Dimas, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a QC Microbiology Lab Tech with a globally leading pharmaceutical company located in San Dimas, CA.

Reference:

SC.CN.28777

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Administrative, Analyst, Other, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Seattle, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Sr. Technical Writer with a globally leading pharmaceutical company located in Seattle, WA.

Reference:

AC.CN.28776

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, General Management, Project Management, Other, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Irvine, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Project Manager - Quality/R&D with a pharmaceutical company located in Irvine, CA.

Reference:

AC.CN.28791

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Market Access, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

New York, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Senior Life Science Market Access/Market Access Consultant with a tier 1 Global Life Science Consulting Firm located in New York, NY.

Reference:

HE.CL.28786

Proclinical office at Chesterford Research Park near Cambridge UK

Proclinical Launches UK Satellite Office at Chesterford Research Park

London, UK – 16 March 2020 Global life sciences recruitment and consulting business, Proclinical, announced the launch of its latest new office this week, located at Chesterford Research Park, less than 20km from the historic city of Cambridge. Proclinical’s new satellite office, which will supplement its London HQ, is ideally positioned to service the Cambridge life sciences and MedTech cluster. The team will operate under the Proclinical Executive brand, focussed on fulfilling executive and senior level search appointments for early stage, growth stage and SMEs across all areas of life sciences, and work closely with the Proclinical Staffing team in the capital to supply permanent and contract recruitment solutions. Already firmly established as a market leader in the UK and US, the specialist staffing firm have launched offices in various global science hubs including Shanghai, Tokyo, Los Angeles, Melbourne and Sydney in recent months. They will join a variety of established and early-stage pharma, biotech and technology research and development companies at the 250-acre parkland facility near Cambridge, including Arecor, AstraZeneca, Cambridge Epigenetix, Lonza, Microbiotica, Isogenica and Camena Bioscience. Director, Iain Hopper remarked, “Cambridge is a world-class life science hub, making it an obvious strategic interest for Proclinical, which continues to expand to meet the increasing demand of our partners across the industry. Despite the abundance of talent in the area, our partners aren’t always able to recruit locally, so as truly global life sciences specialists, we're uniquely placed to unearth and mobilise people with the experience and niche skillsets they are looking for from all over the world. From these superb new facilities, we are able to expand our UK and global operations to support our partners’ continued growth as well as our own.” Chesterford Research Park is home to scientists, investors and entrepreneurs working side by side, developing life-changing drugs within a sustainable environment. About Proclinical As Global Growth Partners, Proclinical provides a unique proposition; delivering on every stage of the life science process to help individuals, teams and whole organizations reach their goals faster. Through our suite of services – Proclinical Staffing, Proclinical Executive, Proclinical Consulting and Proclinical Engage – we help you to grow so that you can bring about a positive impact on global health. To contact Proclinical’s new Cambridge office, please email Ian Hopper i.hopper@proclinical.com.

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How to prepare for a video interview

How to prepare for a video interview

Life sciences organisations have grown to embrace the ease and accessibility of online tools and technologies to connect with applicants and video conferencing has completely changed the landscape in which recruiters and hiring managers can assess candidates for vacant roles. At Proclinical, our experience of facilitating video interviews is that they are an extremely efficient way for businesses, in a global industry such as ours, to assess candidates. They are particularly effective for first-stage assessments, before inviting shortlisted individuals to travel from afar to meet face-to-face – saving time and money for the interviewer and interviewee alike. Video interviews can either be live or prerecorded – which is very convenient for aligning schedules, particularly when applicants are in different time zones. Just as with any other type of interview, applicants need to properly prepare for a video call if you are going to stand out against other candidates. This includes conducting mock interviews, ensuring that your technical equipment is properly setup, and managing your non-verbal cues which will be at the forefront during interviews of this nature. Use these 10 tips to ensure you make a great impression in your next video interview: 1. Check your internet connection in advance A poor internet connection can make or break the success of your interview. It is always best to have your computer physically connected to your internet router. If you’re relying on Wi-Fi, then you have to be prepared for the unexpected, so have a back-up plan, such as connecting to your phone’s 4G signal. The ideal connection speed for a video interview is 10Mbps or higher. If you’re not sure what speed your computer is you can test your connection beforehand by using a site such as Ookla. 2. Get some privacy If you are at home for your video interview, be sure to inform others who may be in the house not to disturb you. If you have young children or pets at home, ask a friend or partner to supervise them during the call if possible. Set your phone to ‘do not disturb’ and lock the door if you can. While you might get sympathy from some interviewers, others consider interruptions or background commotion to be unprofessional. Worse is that it can completely throw you off your game. An embarrassing distraction can leave you flustered and unable to think clearly about your responses, severely impacting your performance and your chances of getting the job. 3. Use a headset Using a headset during a video interview is recommended but not mandatory. Although your webcam or laptop may have a built-in microphone, it is likely to pick up more ambient or background noise than a headset. Furthermore, built-in microphones may not carry your voice as clearly as you would like, which can affect your interviewer’s ability to clearly understand your responses to their questions during the interview. When in doubt, plug in your headset. 4. Choose a plain background Don’t let the informal setting of a video interview fool you – your background is also a very important factor. It is always better to have a neutral or plain background to avoid any distractions and keep the interviewer’s focus on you. Avoid having any posters, photos, mirrors, laundry or a pile of clutter in plain sight. If you’re conducting the video interview on a desktop and you can’t do much about certain background elements, then simply use an inexpensive screen or a solid colour curtain as a disguise. 5. Dress to impress It goes without saying that you have to present yourself in the same professional manner you would if your interview was in-person. Always dress appropriately, avoiding any bright colours or patterns that might be distracting on camera. Avoid flashy jewellery and overdone makeup, and keep your hair simple but professional. 6. Position your webcam Laptops often have integrated webcams above the screen, but when placed on a desk or table, the camera position can be too low, and it can feel to your interviewer as though they are having to look up at you. Simply place your laptop on top of something like a box or stack of books so its camera is positioned slightly above your eye-line. If you are using a free-standing webcam, simply place it on top of something behind your screen so that the built-in camera is similarly aligned. 7. Make eye contact You already know the importance of making strong eye contact during an interview, but don’t underestimate how that comes across on video. When we talk to others, we have a natural tendency to concentrate on their face. The problem is that if the person’s face is located away from your webcam, then it will appear on-screen as though you are either looking up or down rather than directly at the person. Instead, simply move the window with the recruiter’s video image as close as possible to your webcam to enable you to maintain proper eye-contact. 8. Maintain good posture Having good posture applies whether the interview is in-person or online. Because you’re on video, your interviewer will probably not see the lower part of your body; however, you still want to make sure that you’re sitting up straight with both feet planted firmly on the ground. Try to avoid showing side angle and always make sure that your chair is properly adjusted so that you don’t appear too high or too low. 9. Be aware of your body language You want to come across as friendly and approachable – and a warm and confident smile will do the trick. But you don’t want to come across as overly enthusiastic or nervous by smiling or laughing at every word that the other person says. The key here is moderation. Use your smile to project confidence and enthusiasm without overdoing it. Keep in mind that every movement you make during a video interview becomes more magnified on-screen. If you tend to use a lot of hand gestures, play with your hair or cover your mouth when you get nervous then make a concentrated effort to avoid these distractions during your interview. 10. Practice A great way to identify your nervous tendencies is to practise by recording yourself multiple times and watching videos back to observe your own behaviours. The more time that you spend conducting mock interviews, whether it be on video or in front of your mirror, the more comfortable you will become. Be sure you also know your CV inside and out and practice your answers to competency-based interview questions that you are likely to face. Although there is no sure-fire way to ensure everything runs smoothly during your video interview, these tips can certainly help you to put your best self forward. Let us know your tips and experience of video interviews in the comments below. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '2a6fe3dc-c357-4095-b46f-69cb8c58ba43', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Claire Perry Interview - What it means to be a female leader today

Claire Perry: What it means to be a female leader today

Claire Perry joined Proclinical as a Senior Partner for Proclinical Executive and Vice President of Proclinical US, San Francisco in 2019. In this spotlight interview, Claire sheds light on what she believes it takes to be a successful female leader in the recruitment industry. Claire started her recruitment career in London when she was having trouble making ends meet as a teacher and decided to put herself on the other side of the equation and to work for one of the agencies who were sending her out to schools. She didn’t join a teaching agency but instead secured a position at a boutique IT recruitment agency. Claire was the first woman on the sales floor and within 18 months was the top performer. She then moved to San Diego, CA as the third hire for a leading recruitment company with an objective to build the engineering division and grow the medical device space for the business. In her second year she contributed over 60% of revenue for the entire permanent division and helped grow the office to 28 people in three years. In 2017 Claire was named as a top performer out of 500 consultants in the US. Claire then moved to San Francisco with a start-up agency to help them establish their US footprint, she built a team and billed over $1M in her first full year. Here’s what Claire herself had to say about what it means to be a female leader today: What would you put your success down to? I had some great mentors early on in my career, they took time and patience to teach me how to recruit in one of the world’s most competitive and saturated markets. I owe them a great deal of gratitude. I’ve been part of great teams and have learned something from everyone with whom I’ve had the pleasure of working. Looking inward, the qualities I’ve called forth most in recruitment have been pride, resilience, courage and compassion. I feel good at the end of the day when I’ve done the absolute best job for my clients. When I get knocked down, I get back up, every time, and when fear appears, I stand taller and take another step toward it. As for compassion, everyone has things going on in their lives, it’s good to be understanding when people need you to be, they’ll remember you for it!   What is one characteristic that you believe every leader should possess whether they be male or female?  Integrity is very important, it makes people feel safe, valued and respected. Integrity creates an environment of trust which is key to building a strong team who can share and work together without unnecessary fear. I action integrity by telling the truth, being fair, treating everyone like they are special, valuing everyone’s input, addressing issues quickly and directly and then letting them go, giving people a clean slate every morning no matter what happened the day before (because it's already been dealt with), and speaking up when everyone else is staying quiet. What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career? It’s important to lead by example. I don’t ask my team to do anything I wouldn’t do. What advice would you give the next generation of female leaders? Support other females in the workplace. I recently heard a story about a female HR leader who refused to grant a manager’s request for a woman’s pay increase, but she granted one to a male on that same manager’s team. The manager told me that he was disappointed because the woman was a better performer than the male. He said this was the first time he'd really seen a woman holding another woman back in the workplace. As women, we’ve been conditioned by society for hundreds of years to compete with each other for survival but that’s not the way it needs to be any more, and people are slowly waking up to that. We can become conscious of when we’re competing rather than supporting, pause and make the decision to change, then shift our behaviour. It may feel unnatural at first, but stay open to it, keep trying, and I promise you’ll feel more whole, more connected and much happier. By encouraging, supporting and helping each other we not only teach others how to treat us but, we can pass down the gift of our knowledge to the next generation. What inspiring women have you met in the recruitment industry?I met a woman who was so broke that, for her interview, she bought a three-dollar suit from a charity shop. She came into the office to interview, leaned across the table and with determination in her eyes said she’d be just fine to join a sales floor of twenty men. Within a year she was flying her family overseas for a vacation. I met another woman who, struck with cancer lying on her death bed, decided that if she made it back to health, she’d do what she’d always wanted to do and become a recruiter. Now she’s very successful. I meet many women who throw themselves into the gladiator ring of recruitment with both fear and courage, but they take direction, keep showing up, and go on to completely transform their lives. At Proclinical, we are delighted to celebrate Claire’s achievements and the many other talented, successful women employed by the company globally. If you are seeking to join a diverse business that will fully support your career aspirations, consider applying to work for Proclinical. We have a range of recruitment consultant jobs available at all levels, as well as management and director positions. 

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The 10 most influential women in the history of medicine | Proclinical

The 10 most influential women in the history of medicine

Often in the face of prejudice and discrimination, many women over the centuries have made outstanding medical contributions, and continue to do so today. Throughout history, women were largely excluded from the realms of science and medicine, except for nursing or midwifery, but there are some rare exceptions of women in medicine, tracing back to ancient times. The mid-1850s marked a turning point in society’s view towards women working in science and medicine, although they would still struggle to be seen as equals for the next hundred or so years.  Here is Proclinical’s list, celebrating some of history’s most influential women in life sciences and their extraordinary achievements and contributions that have saved countless lives and continue to inspire generations of women in medicine to this day. Metrodora (c. 200-400 AD) Metrodora, a Greek female physician, wrote On the Diseases and Cures of Women, the oldest medical text known to be written by a woman. Notably, it did not include information on obstetrics, the study of childbirth, which was extremely rare in a time when women were restricted to gynaecology and midwifery. However, Metodora is known to have covered all areas of medicine related to women, developing various therapies and surgical techniques that were revolutionary in her time. She was heavily influenced by the work of Greek physician Hippocrates, and her work has influenced and been referenced by many other physician writers throughout history. Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910) British-born Elizabeth Blackwell is best known as the first woman to earn an medical degree (MD) in the US. She was raised in a forward-thinking, socially active family. Her father was a passionate advocate for the abolition of slavery, and her siblings went on to campaign for women’s rights. After facing rejection from several universities, Blackwell was finally accepted to Geneva Medical College in 1847. She received hostility from her fellow students at first, eventually earning their respect and graduating first in her class in 1849. In 1857, she opened the New York Infirmary for Women and Children along with her sister, Dr Emily Blackwell (the third woman to earn an MD) and Dr Marie Zakrzewska. Blackwell played an important role in both the United States and the United Kingdom as a social awareness and moral reformer, and promoted education for women in medicine through her inspirational book Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women.  Marie Curie (1867-1934) Polish mathematician and scientist Marie Curie collaborated with her husband, Pierre, to discover two chemical elements in the periodic table: polonium and radium. This important work observed that there was a relationship between radioactivity and the heavy elements of the periodic table, and led to much advancement in medicine. Most notably, it led the way to the development of the x-ray, which allowed internal imagery to be used for diagnosis without the need for open surgery, and radiation therapy for treating cancer. During WWI, Marie and her daughter Irene brought mobile X-Ray machines and radiology units to the front line, which allowed more than a million wounded soldiers to be treated.Curie earned a Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903, and yet another in Chemistry in 1911, the first and only woman to have been honoured twice. The Curie Institute in Paris, she founded in 1920, is still a major cancer research facility today. Gerty Cori (1896-1957) Another Nobel Prize winner, Gerty Cori, earned the prestigious award for her work in medicine/physiology in 1947. Cori was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize in this category. She worked with her husband, Carl Ferdinand Cori, with whom she shared an interest in preclinical science, to prove vital concepts in genetics. Their work led to the discovery that an enzyme deficiency could be responsible for metabolism disorders. They also carried out multiple studies on the action of hormones, focusing on the pituitary gland. Over her lifetime, Gerty won several other awards in recognition for her contributions to science and earned honorary Doctor of Science degrees from Boston University, Smith College, Yale, Columbia and Rochester between 1948 and 1955. Virginia Apgar (1909-1974) Virginia Apgar is famous for her invention of the Apgar score, a vital test that was quickly adopted by doctors to test whether newborn babies required urgent medical attention. The Apgar score is responsible for reducing infant mortality rates considerably and is still used today to assess the clinical condition of newborns in the first few minutes of life. Apgar was the first woman to become a full professor at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Gertrude Belle Elion (1918-1999) American chemist Gertrude "Trudy" Belle Ellion shared a Nobel Prize with George H Hitchins and Sir James Black for innovative methods of rational drug design which focused on understanding the target of the drug rather than simply using trial and error. Coming from a scientific background, Elion was inspired to pursue medicine when her grandfather passed away from cancer when she was 15 and became dedicated to discovering a cure for the disease. Using the methods she had designed, Elion and her team developed a staggering 45 patents, including drugs to combat leukemia, herpes, AIDS and treatments to reduce the body's rejection of foreign tissue in kidney transplants between unrelated donors.  Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) British scientist Rosalind Franklin is best known for her work in understanding the structure of DNA, using x-ray photographs to solve its complexities. Her identification of the double helix has led to huge advances in the field of genetics and modern medicine. Franklin also led pioneering work on the molecular structures of RNA viruses and Polio. Franklin had a passion for science from an early age and decided to become a scientist at the age of 15. She fought against her father’s reluctance to let her undertake higher education and graduated from Cambridge University in 1941. She worked for many years as a first-rate scientist and were it not for her untimely death from cancer in 1958, it is highly likely that she would have shared Nobel Prizes in both 1962 and 1982 for work that she had a huge role in during her lifetime.   Rosalyn Yalow (1921-2011) America  medical physicist Rosalyn Yalow received the Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine in 1977 for the development of the radioimmunoassays (RIA) technique, which is used to measure peptide hormones in the blood. Yalow’s diagnostic technique was so precise that it was used to scan blood donations for infectious diseases such as HIV and hepatitis. This was fundamental in ensuring life-saving blood transfusions were safe and effective. Later, the method allowed scientists to prove that type-2 diabetes is caused by the body not being able to use insulin properly. Patricia Goldman-Rakic (1937-2003) Neuroscientist Patricia Goldman-Rakic is recognised for her studies of the brain, particularly, the frontal lobes and how it relates to memory. She gained her bachelor’s degree in Neurology from Vassar in 1959, and then her doctorate from the University of California in Developmental Psychology in 1963. Her multidisciplinary research significantly contributed to the understanding of neurological diseases such as dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s and her study of dopamine and its effects on the brain is essential to modern day understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Francoise Barré-Sinoussi (born 1947) Parisian scientist Francoise Barré-Sinoussi is a celebrated for her discovery of HIV as the cause of the immunodeficiency disease, AIDS. In 2008, Barré, along with Luc Montaigner, discovered that the HIV retrovirus attacked lymphocytes, a blood cell that plays an important role in the body’s immune system. Her vital work has helped millions of people who are HIV-positive to live long, healthy lives, and could pave the way for a cure in the near future. This is by no means an exhaustive list of notable women in medicine. You can find many more recognised by STEM Women, alongside others from the wider field of science and technology.  Which women in medicine have inspired you? Let us know in the comments below. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'b067d5a2-f614-49b3-add3-d906762f610a', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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IR35 is drawing close: Here’s how your business needs to prepare

IR35 is drawing close: Here’s how your business needs to prepare

The time is drawing ever closer for the UK Off Payroll Working Rules (IR35) to make its mark on the private sector, having been in use within the public sector since 2017. These rules will apply to any individual who is operating as a personal services company (PSC) and is engaged by a medium to large sized business which operates in the UK private sector. For those supporting a small company (as deemed by the Companies Act 2006) it remains the responsibility of the PSC to make their own status determination statement. The new rules that will apply mean that the end user (the client) will be responsible for assessing the individual’s employment status under the IR35 rules. The business or agency will be responsible for deducting income tax and National Insurance contributions (NICs) via PAYE and will be required to pay employer NICs. We've developed a guidebook to help businesses in the life sciences industry understand how the new rules will affect them.  Estimates vary; however the consensus is that contractors and consultant represent around a quarter of the working population a, spread across both sectors. Within the public sector experience, the new rules have led to multiple requests for increasing rates or moves to permanent roles which reflect the requirements of the legislation. The focus of most publications and opinions has been toward the contractor (employee-based elements of the changes) however, the costs and responsibilities, which can be significant, are on the employers and should not be underestimated or ignored. Here are the steps your business should take to prepare for IR35: Conduct a full review Review all staff and contractors currently working within your business to try and identify who will be bound by the new rules. A number of service providers have supplied checklists or questionnaires which claim to provide businesses with an in or out determination. Unfortunately, it’s not as simple as that. A ruling by Lord Justice Nolan in the Court of Appeal case Mummery J in Lorimer v Hall said: “This is not a mechanical exercise of running through items on a check list to see whether they are present in, or absent from, a given situation. The object of the exercise is to paint a picture from the accumulation of detail.” With Lord Justice Nolan’s ruling in mind, it is the gathering of the data or evidence that will allow you to make the determination. Businesses can use the Check Employment Status for Tax (CEST) service provided by HMRC. This tool has been updated, as previous versions were deemed not fit for purpose. The updated version can be used by workers providing a service, a person or organisation hiring a contractor, or an agency or recruiter that is placing a contractor to help determine whether the off payroll working rules apply. Key things to consider when checking the status of Contractor: What are the Contactor’s responsibilities? Who controls the individual (i.e. when, where and how do they work)? How they are paid? Are they directly in receipt of any benefit or expense? However, these tests are fallible and gauging by some of the recent decisions seen at the UK’s Tax Tribunals, it would suggest that some may not be 100% effective at determining the correct status in every scenario, which is why additional professional assistance could prove pivotal. This is where Proclinical can assist with the evidence gathering and classification of the required detail.REVIEW CONTRACTS AND TERMS OF BUSINESSThis is a key element of deciding whether IR35 should be applied. This defines the individual’s independence from the business and whether they are free to pursue other work outside of the company, which is valuable if you’re seeking an outside determination. In essence, this dictates the element of control that a business or recruitment agency has over the Contractor.Where it is clearly evident that they can apply whatever control required, such as the specific hours worked or the location of work, then HMRC could assume that despite being seemingly self-employed via their own private service company (PSC), they are in fact an employee of the business, whether temporary or not.Many of these elements of control are often stipulated under a work contract and this document could, therefore, determine whether the off-payroll rules apply. Should you wish to maintain a similar relationship with a contractor, it may be worth reviewing their existing contract, roles and responsibilities to ensure that they are sufficiently distanced from the business so as to be truly self-employed.CALCULATE THE COSTSIf everything remains the same, the initial perception is that many workers will likely fall in-scope of the IR35 rules. Businesses need to take the time to consider the true cost to their business. A review of the costs, in particular the employer’s National Insurance Contributions (ERNICs), may reveal that it is no longer economically viable to have as many contractors or consultants working under the new rules.This is where a pragmatic approach could allow your business to effectively land grab the best talent as there will be a number of businesses who will not appreciate the benefits of changing their working practices to allow for contractors to work in a compliant fashion.Taking a pragmatic approach could allow your business to effectively land grab the best talentPROTECT THE TRULY SELF-EMPLOYEDHMRC has gone to great lengths to make it very clear that IR35 is not intended to target people who are truly self-employed. There has been anecdotal evidence from many of those caught out by the new rules in the public sector who had previously considered themselves to be self-employed.This evidence suggests that some large employers have taken a blanket agreement to include all contractors under the rules to avoid a penalty or reputational damage. Unfortunately, for some contractors, this means that they have been unfairly included within the scope of IR35.Employers should take a cautious approach when applying the rules and take time to identify each person’s status on an individual basis. Applying the rules inappropriately could lead to conflict with key members of staff and has the potential to lead to litigation against a company if a worker feels their new status means that they are unable to work for the business in future.IMPLEMENT NEW RECRUITMENT PROCEDURESConsider your position regarding the recruitment of new workers. By being clear from the outset, those applying for a role should be able to appreciate whether or not they are likely to be bound by the IR35 rules and you as an employer can ensure that their payroll is conducted properly from day one. It would be worthwhile that new adverts and those of agency’s that support you make it clear whether the role is for a set contracted period of work and to be conducted by a self-employed individual.If you begin conducting the necessary checks and putting the correct procedures in place now most employers should be able to avoid any potential liabilities. Also, this will ensure that the contractors that they work with are fully aware of how the change will affect them.In HMRC’s guidance it is made clear that “the people making the decision should be trained, suitably qualified and understand the rules”Businesses must not underestimate the impact of IR35 and must begin taking steps now to ensure they are ready to apply the rules from April. Good communication with your contractors and your managers regarding these changes is an important element of conducting all the changes.In HMRC’s guidance it is made clear that “the people making the decision should be trained, suitably qualified and understand the rules”. They will also need to consider all the facts and speak with both internal and external partners and most importantly, the contractors.Here at Proclinical we offer a service that will help you demonstrate the use “reasonable care” by correlating all the available data into a pack. Our expertise in interviewing, auditing employment agreements, the understanding of the working practices of both parties with the knowledge around the proposed legislation will provide extremely advantageous. We are able to utilise our specialist skills and expertise in advising both businesses and individuals in relation to the new rules and the steps they need to be taking. To book a free one-hour scoping call please email our team at IR35@proclinical.com. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'ce23151f-48ef-4321-81ce-89c4efd24ca6', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Top trends that make Australia a location of choice for life sciences talent

Top trends that make Australia a location of choice for life sciences talent

Australia’s life science industry has gone from strength to strength, growing by an impressive 16% between 2017 and 2019. Fueled by technological advancement and the rising biotechnology and medical device sectors, Australia is becoming a world-leading life sciences hub, and solidifying its reputation as very attractive place to work for professionals across the industry.WORLD-CLASS LIFE SCIENCES HUBSA large percentage of Australia ASX-listed life science companies are found in Melbourne – the costal capital of Victoria – which is known as one of the top 5 biotechnology hubs in the world. Victoria together with New South Wales – particularly the region’s capital, Sydney – boast 73% of the 243,406 strong workforce, including businesses, government and regulatory organisations, funding bodies, research institutes and support services.While Melbourne is the focal point of biotechnology innovation, with a booming cell and gene therapy market, Brisbane is also becoming known as a rising medical device and medical technology base. These growing sectors will provide many exciting opportunities for life science professionals to be at the forefront of innovation in coming years. Drive for research and innovation Generous investment from the world-renowned Australian regulatory bodies along with government R&D tax incentives, has encouraged a number of highly innovative biotechnology and health technology companies – both home-grown and from overseas – to take root in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. There is a solid presence of leading global life science companies, such as AbbVie, Johnson & Johnson and IQVIA, that provide thousands of job opportunities for life science professionals. However, there is also an impressive base of local talent beginning to shape the industry. Blockbuster Australian-based life science companies such as CSL, Polynovo and Viralytics have grown hugely in recent years – with no sign of slowing down. For example, in 2019 Viralytics was bought by MSD, a leading global life science company, which will boost funding into the company’s research into developing viruses that infect and kill cancer cells. Many other small and medium pharma, biotech and med device/tech companies are partnering with global life science companies – the likes of Roche and Siemens Healthcare – helping these industries with Australia further grow and mature. Life science professionals looking to work in biotech and med tech will find an abundance of opportunity here. Melbourne is also a great destination for those working in academia, attracting a bulk of Australia’s medical research funding (approximately US$370 million) every year. In fact, Melbourne is the one of only three cities in the entire world to have two universities that rank in the top 20 for biomedical research. Specialist skillsets A major emerging trend in recruitment patterns in Australia reflect the worldwide demand for life science professionals to become more and more specialised in their field. As medical advancement pushes us towards more targeted, personalised medicine – such as cell and gene therapy – these highly specialised companies require people with specific skillsets and experience to match. Therefore, a solid expectation moving forward into 2020 and beyond is that life science professionals must adapt to the need for targeted experience in order to keep up with the changing landscape of healthcare in Australia, and the rest of the world. The landscape in Australia itself is being particularly influenced by the country’s focus on biotechnology and medical devices/health technology, which dominates the industry sector. The new life science jobs that these new technologies create need to be filled with qualified professionals who understand how they work. Another growing focus for the Australian life science industry is the research, development and manufacturing of medicinal cannabis. The extraction of medicinal components within cannabis could change the way we treat various neurological diseases like epilepsy, conditions such as ADD and PTSD, and improve pain management. Technological advancement Technological advancements play a big part in the drive for more specialised skillsets across Australia. The rise of health technology and artificial intelligence is helping the life science industry gain more understanding into what causes various diseases, how to better detect and diagnose them and, eventually, how to best manage or cure them. The medical device/technology industry is making particular strides in this area with the development of wearables and medical mobile apps. These devices enable the life science sector to gather unprecedented amounts of information from patients about their conditions, contributing to a growing influx of big data. Artificial intelligence is making it possible for medical device and health technology companies to analyse this data to check for new disease patterns and even discover new disease indicators. Therefore, there is a much higher demand for life science professionals to specialise in these growing areas. For example, the collection of vast amounts of patient data from both medical technology and early phase clinical trails in Australia, is raising issues over cyber security. This calls for specialised software engineers and IT security personnel to help build solid and secure infrastructure to support the ever-increasing amount of information. Data scientists and bioinformaticians are also in high demand to help companies understand and interpret biological data. As an established biotechnology hub that is growing in strength and a rising power within medical devices and health technology, Australia provides ample opportunity for professionals keen to further their careers and specialise within these exciting fields.   As a global company with offices in Australia and the wider APAC region, our life science recruitment experts at Proclinical Staffing are here to help employers looking to recruit across the sector. To speak to a local specialist, get in touch with our team.

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Proclinical Australia in Sydney and Melbourne

Hobson Prior Australia makes strategic switch to Proclinical brand

Recruitment firm Hobson Prior’s two Australian offices, in Melbourne and Sydney, have been rebranded as Proclinical it was announced this week. The teams in Victoria and New South Wales will remain unchanged, however the move is expected to provide a boost to their existing clients and candidates and allow an improved flow of talent by strengthening international ties with other Proclinical offices, both regionally and globally. The two life sciences staffing providers, Hobson Prior and Proclinical, form part of the UK-based Independent Clinical Services (ICS) group, which consists of multiple businesses in the broader healthcare space. The switch in Australia, which is effective immediately, represents a strategic one that it hopes will leverage the group’s wider presence and build on its network through collaboration between teams. Proclinical has steadily grown its brand across the region over the last decade adding an office in Japan, and two in China to its long-established Singapore offering, each benefitting from a shared network of international clients and candidates, to which Australia will now form an important part. The brand change does not extend to Hobson Prior’s offices in the UK and Switzerland, which will remain unaffected and in healthy competition with Proclinical across its established European markets. Melbourne-based Director Tom Parsons commented, “We are all very excited about this new chapter. To be able to collaborate with Proclinical’s teams across the wider Asia-Pacific territory will only enhance our offering and enable us to become the market leader for life sciences staffing services in the region. I’d like to reassure our current clients and candidates in Australia that, although we’re now operating under a different name, it’s business as usual and services will be uninterrupted. Going forward, we are confident that they will feel the benefit as we are able to tap into a broader global network and better mobilise candidates to where the industry needs them.” The Australian life sciences industry employs over 243,000 people and its thriving ecosystem benefits from key biotech hubs in Victoria and New South Wales. Growth in the sector is also driven by its emerging medical technology and digital health companies. Contact the teams in Melbourne on +61 3 85184459 or Sydney on +61 2 99659490. About Proclinical As Global Growth Partners, Proclinical provides a unique proposition; delivering on every stage of the life science process to help individuals, teams and whole organizations reach their goals faster. Through our suite of services – Proclinical Staffing, Proclinical Executive, Proclinical Consulting and Proclinical Engage – we help you to grow so that you can bring about a positive impact on global health.

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Pharma & Medical Devices Opportunities and Challenges 2020 and beyond

Pharma and Medical Devices Opportunities and Challenges: 2020 and beyond

Over the last decade, the pharmaceutical and medical device industries have experienced many transformative trends and innovations that have rapidly improved the medicines available to patients around the world. In just ten years, we have seen the influence of artificial intelligence and big data on diagnosing and treating disease, as well as a shift toward preventing life threatening conditions rather than medicating them.   This impressive growth in the life science industry is thanks to the many opportunities on the horizon in 2020 and beyond. In 2019, the global pharmaceutical industry was worth approximately $1.2 trillion, a figure that is predicted to rise to around $1.5 trillion by 2023. The medical device industry was estimated at $425.5 billion in 2018 and is expected to increase 5.4% by 2025, reaching $612.5 billion. However, there are several challenges to overcome to continue bringing new and improved medicines to patients globally, which we explore in our video above and discuss in more detail below. Increasing populations As global populations increase and people are living longer thanks to improved healthcare, more and more strain is being put on the life science industry to treat growing patient populations. According to the World Population Prospects by United Nations, by 2050 the global population will number over 9.3 billion, with over 20% being 60 or older. Therefore, the demand to meet their healthcare needs will be an ongoing challenge. Even today, patients of all ages are finding it harder to access even basic health care due to over-subscribed doctors’ surgeries and hospitals. Telemedicine Even though increasing populations will remain a challenge in the foreseeable future, emerging technologies are helping the over-burdened health sector combat some of these pressures. For example, telemedicine is beginning to transform the way that patients receive lower level health care, making it possible for them to conduct consultations with health care professionals virtually, through their personal computer and mobile devices. Health care providers can evaluate, diagnose and treat patients from a distance which maximises both efficiency and convenience for both sides. Telemedicine is predicted to become an increasingly integral part of health care systems in various markets around the world to help manage rising demand. Wearables  Due to both age and lifestyle factors, chronic diseases will continue to be a serious issue for the pharma industry over the coming years. 50% of people in the USA alone are living with at least one chronic disease, many with two or more. Previously, chronic diseases were more prevalent in developed world, but in recent years developing countries such as China are experiencing higher rates of chronic illness – in particular, diabetes. This has caused a serious need for the pharma industries all over the world to help patients better manage and control their conditions, which in turn will take the pressure off their hospitals and other healthcare services. In particular, the medical device industry is making strides in combatting the chronic disease crisis with the development of wearable devices and innovative software. These innovations help patients monitor and control their chronic condition themselves. Currently, these include wearable glucose monitors for diabetics, smart watches with in-built ECG monitors and various mobile applications that help patients track things like symptoms, triggers and medication. The wearable devices industry is projected to be worth $29 billion by 2029, compared with $6.8 billion in 2017, showing huge potential for wearable device innovations to tackle the burden of chronic disease and improve patients’ quality of life. Rising prescription prices The annual price of specialty drugs has tripled over the last ten years, with the cost of developing a single drug rising to an estimated $2.6 billion in 2019. The US spends more per capita on medication than anywhere else in the world. Medical bills are the primary reason why Americans go bankrupt and are a key electoral issue for both Republicans and Democrats in 2020. Drugmakers claim that America is carrying the cost of research and development for the rest of the world and if Americans stopped paying such high prices for drugs, investment in innovative treatments would fall. Discovering new drugs is getting harder, Jennifer Taubert, executive vice-president at Janssen Pharmaceuticals told the Financial Times. “The easy diseases have largely been solved. It gets harder and harder as we go after new treatments for ever more challenging diseases.” High drug pricing filters down into the rest of the world and often stops patients outside America from accessing the most effective medicines available. The challenge is whether the US can reduce the price of prescriptions, and if they do, will this cause prices to rise everywhere else? Generics and biosimilars While the US government faces ongoing challenges to control increasing drug prices, there is some hope in the future that these life-saving medicines will become more accessible to patients. For example, the rise of the generic market. Generic versions of a drug can be manufactured once the company’s patent has run out, making it more affordable to patients. There are patents for various blockbuster drugs, such as Truvada to treat HIV, set to expiring in the next few years, bringing us closer to more affordable medicines. In fact, the global generic industry is expected to be worth $474 billion by 2023, a 6.8% increase from 2018. For biologic drugs, the generic version is known as a biosimilar. There are also several important biologic patents expiring soon, predicting that in 2020 alone, $100bn worth of biologics will be available to manufacture for much less, lowering the price by 30-50% for patients around the world. Artificial Intelligence and Big Data There is no doubt that the emergence of artificial intelligence has already begun to revolutionise healthcare. Pharmaceutical and medical device companies have been harnessing powerful tools such as machine learning (with the help of technology companies) to transform digital processes, improve patient management, detect and diagnose disease with unprecedented precision and even aid drug discovery. AI has been hugely successful in processing and analysing large amounts of big data through the use of deep learning, semantic computing and neural networks. These techniques that are thought to mimic human-like processes, but at super-human speed and intelligence. In the case of medical imaging, AI has made it possible to detect malignancies in scans that are impossible to see with the naked eye. Since the extent of AI capabilities are mostly unexplored, there is much potential for growth over the next few years. The market for AI tools used in healthcare is expected to exceed $34 billion by the mid 2020s. Gene editing In 2018, an innovation known as CRISPR made headlines as an emerging gene editing technology that could revolutionise medicine in the future. Research is determining whether CRISPR technology could be the key to eradicating harmful viruses, curing cancer, correcting genetic diseases and extending the human lifespan. These many possibilities are causing great excitement within the scientific community, and although it will take years of further research and testing, the next decade could revolutionise the way we understand, diagnose and treat disease. However, with the potential limits of genetic engineering still unknown, the subject has been exposed to major controversy. Should humans have the power to edit genes? Will this lead to an even bigger ethical conundrum than the ‘designer baby’? These important arguments will certainly play a big part in how the field of genetic engineering develops in the coming years. Personalised medicine The percentage of drugs that make it through from development to regulatory approval is at an all time low. Currently, only 1 in every 10 drugs are successful through clinical trials. This is largely due to an unacceptable level of adverse effects reported by trial participants. Adverse effects arising from prescription drugs remain a major issue globally and is a leading cause of death in some countries. Fortunately, it’s not all doom and gloom. The rapid rise of personalised or precision medicine is really helping to reduce the impact of side effects for patients. Precision medicine is the term to describe drugs, therapies and devices that deliver tailor-made treatments to individual patients, hugely reducing the risk of side effects while increasing its effectiveness. Examples of these treatments include immuno-oncology and gene editing, as discussed above. Precision medicine has been made possible thanks to new technologies helping the pharma and medical device industries gain more genetic understanding of both patients and diseases. There are certainly many obstacles to overcome in the 2020s, most significantly the rapidly increasing patient populations around the globe and climbing drug prices. However, the truly incredible innovations and new technologies that are only just beginning to emerge suggest that there are many exciting opportunities for the pharma and medical device industries to explore over the coming years. What challenges do you foresee for the life sciences industry over the coming decade? Let us know in the comments below.

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Proclinical open new office in Culver City, Los Angeles, CA

Proclinical expands West Coast presence to meet demand of LA’s booming biotechs

Los Angeles, January 20, 2020Proclinical’s rapid growth in the US continues to gain momentum as the life sciences staffing and consulting provider announced the opening of their newest offices in Los Angeles, CA this week. The new Proclinical office – located in Culver City, close to Venice Beach – will serve as a base to focus on growing biotech demand in California, perfectly complimenting their existing medtech-focused team in the San Francisco Bay area. Since first entering the US in 2016, UK-founded Proclinical has now put boots on the ground in 6 locations across America. Proclinical Director, Jimmy Mooney, based at the new office said, “Proclinical see’s Los Angeles as an emerging biotech hub, with state, institutional and private investment coming in. LA is poised to become the fastest growing biotech hub in the state. With incubators like BioLa and LA Biosciences Hub recently launched, Los Angeles will see continued growth and Proclinical is in a great position to contribute.”   As the world’s fifth largest economy, The Golden State already boasts two substantial biotech hubs – in the San Francisco Bay Area and San Diego – and the emergence of Los Angeles County as a third was recently identified by Biocom’s 2019 Economic Impact Report Databook. According to the report, last year all sectors of the life science industry generated $42.5 billion in economic activity and adds $23.5 billion to the county's gross profit. In the region, there are approximately 92,000 related jobs with an average earning of $83,000. Those jobs also support almost 191,000 peripheral jobs in the region, the data shows. Contact the new Los Angeles office on +1 213-338-7041.About ProclinicalAs Global Growth Partners, Proclinical provides a unique proposition; delivering on every stage of the life science process to help individuals, teams and whole organizations reach their goals faster.Through our suite of services – Proclinical Staffing, Proclinical Executive, Proclinical Consulting and Proclinical Engage – we help you to grow so that you can bring about a positive impact on global health.

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The most significant FDA approvals of the decade 2010-2019

The most significant FDA approvals of the decade (2010-2019)

From innovative leaps in cancer diagnosis and treatment to the growing force of artificial intelligence in aiding medical discovery, the 2010s was a ground-breaking decade for the life science industry. We have seen the steady rise of targeted and personalised medicines, and advancements in genetic engineering have thrown up controversial yet undeniably ground-breaking potential that could completely change the way we diagnose and treat disease in the future. To bring these incredible drug breakthroughs to US patients, the Food & Drug Association (FDA) approved a significant number of innovative drugs and therapies between 2010-2019. 2017 was a record-breaking year – with the FDA approving 55 drugs, and in 2019, there was still an impressive 48 innovative medicines approved.  Many of these medicines were approved by other industry bodies elsewhere in the world, such as the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and China’s National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) increasing the accessibility of these new, life saving treatments to patients globally. The last decade has been truly outstanding for medical innovation and discovery. Below are some of the most significant FDA approvals of the 2010s, within the context of the top 5 biggest areas of medical advancement. Gene therapyGene therapy is a type of treatment that works by replacing damaged, defective or missing genes that cause disease in a patient, with normal healthy genes. Latest advancements in this area include the highly controversial CRISPR technology, which could give us the power to fully manipulate a person’s DNA to eradicate disease. The FDA have made a number of gene therapy approvals over the last decade, bringing hope to patients suffering with a variety of very serious conditions like cancer and genetic disease. Gene therapy treatments are an excellent example of the move towards personalised medicine, as these drugs are individually tailored to each patient. Some of the most important gene therapies approved by the FDA this decade include Kymriah (developed by Novartis in 2018) and Yescarta (developed by Kite Pharma in 2017) which both treat different types of lymphoma, as well as Luxturna in 2017 – Spark Therapeutics’ therapy to treat an inherited eye disease called IRD which caused blindness.  ImmunotherapyThe concept of immunotherapy is not new, dating back to the late 1800s when physicians attempted to stimulate a person’s natural immune system to fight disease. However, in the last ten years, immunotherapy has transformed into a complex technology with untold potential to treat a range of life-threatening diseases. It has been particularly ground-breaking in cancer, completely changing the landscape of how to treat the disease for years to come. The technology is also helping researchers understand more about the mechanics of the disease, which may lead to an eventual cancer cure. The first break-through immunotherapy approved by the FDA was Provenge in 2010, a cancer vaccine that was proven to effectively treat multiple cancers, from melanoma and lymphoma to lung and liver cancers. As the technology become more advanced, various other FDA approvals followed, including Opdivo in 2014, Keytruda for multiple types of cancer in 2016 and Tecentriq for lung cancer in 2019.  Rare DiseasesRare diseases, also referred to as orphan diseases, are a group of around 7,000 known diseases that affect a small percentage of the population, usually 1 in 200,000. However, in the USA, rare disease is not so rare when grouped together – affecting as many as 1 in 10 Americans. Therefore, the steady increase in FDA approvals for rare disease drugs over the last decade has been a significant achievement. Most notably, the emergence of RNA interference technology, has been a real breakthrough in the area of rare disease. It works by providing new DNA to cells which modifies them to treat the disease. The FDA approved the first-of-its kind RNAi therapy – Onpattro – in 2018 to treat peripherial nerve disease which is caused by a rare disease called hereditary transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR). This promising treatment could be used in future to treat other devastating rare diseases such as Huntington’s disease.Outside of RNAi, the FDA has approved some other milestone drugs to treat rare disease. These include Crysvita in 2018, to treat a genetic bone disease called X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), and Galafold which helps patients suffering from Fabry disease, a rare disease that affects the kidneys, heart and nervous system.  HIVAt the end of the 2000s, there had certainly been significant improvements in the treatment of HIV, with the life expectancy of patients increasing from 2-3 years in the 1990s to several decades by 2010. In the years since then, HIV treatment has made even bigger strides in prolonging and improving the lives of HIV patients globally. FDA approvals for the treatment of HIV have accelerated in the last five years in particular, with a ground-breaking 9 drugs approved in 2018 alone – out of the total 29 drugs approved since the early 1980s. Out of these many approvals this decade, several stand out. In 2018, the FDA approved the first single-tablet treatment for HIV – Gilead’s Biktarvy, which proved much more manageable than the standard cocktail of drugs patients would take every day. Merck’s Doravirine, also approved in 2018, is a highly effective combination therapy that showed higher tolerance in patients than older HIV drugs. In 2019, the FDA approved another two HIV drugs by Merck – Delstrigo and Pifeltro that are thought to be the most effective three-drug, single-tablet regimen available to HIV patients who have not had any previous treatment.  Although originally approved in 2004 as a treatment for people who are already infected, the approval of Gilead's Truvada in 2012 as a prophylactic carried much greater significance since it can now be used by individuals at high risk as a precautionary measure to stop them from contracting the virus. Although there is still no cure for HIV, the ability to extend patients’ lives by several decades and enable them to live with fewer and fewer side effects of both the disease and its medication is proving to be one of the greatest accomplishments of the decade. Neurology Neurology is one of the most complex areas of science, with researchers still having very limited understanding of how the human brain works, least of all the mechanics the many diseases that affect it. However, in the last decade, the life science industry has made important steps in understanding and treating some of the most devastating neurological diseases that affect millions globally. These include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis and motor neuron disease (MND) also known as ALS. While there have certainly been fewer quick fixes or cures in this elusive field, the mere ability to alleviate symptoms and slow down the progression of neurodegenerative disease has been ground-breaking. The most significant FDA approvals for neurological disease this decade include Xadago (2017) to treats Parkinson’s patients who have stopped responding to Levodopa, the leading treatment since the 1960s. Multiple sclerosis (MS), a common neurodegenerative disease, had it’s first FDA approval for the primary progressive strain of the disease in 2017 with Ocrevus, which also improved the symptoms of other MS patients. Perhaps among the most devastating of neurodegenerative diseases – MND/ALS – had a real break-through moment in 2017 was the development of Radicava, the only approved drug available to patients today. The long-awaited FDA approval of Radicava gave patients the chance to slow the progression of the disease and improve their ability to carry out day-to-day tasks such as eating and speaking.  As we enter yet another decade, we can look forward to the untold potential of exciting medical technologies such as artificial intelligence, genetic engineering and immunotherapy, as well as continuing to see advancements in growing therapeutics areas such as neurology, antibiotic resistance and HIV. 

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