tolaini test

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Project Engineering, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Mountain View, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Senior Electrical Engineer for a medical technology and device company located in Mountain View, CA.

Reference:

EN.DB.26478_1573765336

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Biological Sciences, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Philadelphia, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for an Associate Scientist for a global pharmaceutical company located in Philadelphia, PA.

Reference:

SC.MR.26479_1573764872

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Contract, Laboratory Technician, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Laboratory Assistant for a multinational biotechnology company located in Cambridge, MA.

Reference:

SC.ZH.26476_1573762519

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Contract, General Management, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Santa Monica, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for Business Process Improvement Manager for a globally leading pharmaceutical company located in Santa Monica, CA.

Reference:

AC.CN.26475_1573761375

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Contract, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

San Dimas, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Quality Systems Specialist II position with a national biopharmaceutical company located in San Dimas, CA.

Reference:

QA.BT.26474_1573757353

Salary:

Swiss Franc0.00 - Swiss Franc250000.00 per annum

Options Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Ophthalmology, VP/Head of Clinical Operations, Switzerland, Sales, Executive
Location:

Bern, Switzerland

Description

A job vacancy for a Global Program Clinical Head - Ophthalmology has arisen at a leading global pharmaceutical company specialising in development of biological therapies.

Reference:

ME.TR.26465_1573748567

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Medical Communications, Medical Writing, United Kingdom, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

London, England

Description

A vacancy has arisen for a Senior Medical Writer with a global medical communications network, based in their UK office, but looking to relocate to Basel.

Reference:

MC.GW.26468_1573748371

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Product development, Malaysia, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Kuala Lumpur

Description

An international pharmaceutical company that specialises in medical devices is advertising a vacancy for a Clinical Product Manager who will join their office in Malaysia.

Reference:

BD.MF.25066_1573747172

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Pharmaceuticals, Contract, Officer /Associate, United Kingdom, Sales, Associate
Location:

Uxbridge, England

Description

A vacancy has arisen for a Human Resources Assistant with an internationally renowned pharmaceutical company, based in their UK office.

Reference:

RA.PD.26437_1573747077

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Contract, Finance, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, USA

Description

Proclinical is recruiting for a Financial Planning and Reporting Analyst for a biopharmaceutical company located in Cambridge, MA.

Reference:

AC.SR.26452_1573746938

Proclinical collect the APSCo award for Recruitment Company with the Most Sustainable Growth 2019

Proclinical Staffing retains title as “Recruitment Company with the Most Sustainable Growth”

London, 16th October 2019 – Proclinical Staffing cemented its credentials for growth last week as the life science recruiter was once again named “Recruitment Company with the Most Sustainable Growth”. The title was awarded by the Association of Professional Staffing Companies (APSCo) at their London ceremony, which took place on Wednesday 8th October.   For Proclinical – whose tagline ‘Global Growth Partners’ reflects their proposition to their client-base – this was an impressive retention of the award they won in 2018, which followed a special commendation given by the APSCo judges for the same category in 2017. In total, this marks the 5th APSCo Award Proclinical has scooped in the past 4 years. In that time its turnover has increased from £20M to £57M and headcount has more than doubled to over 200 employees in 9 countries.  In 2019 alone, the life science specialists have opened a second office in China and added new sites in Japan, India, Sweden, and Germany.   Attending the Awards Ceremony, Daniel Jones, Proclinical’s Global Managing Director, said “We are honoured and very grateful to APSCo to receive this accolade for the second year in succession. Their standard is very high, and this particular award carries an added layer of prestige because it commends both our performance and our trajectory. To keep hold of this award is particularly satisfying and is a testament to the way we do business – by focussing on long-term partnerships. These are exciting times at Proclinical and the character shown by the whole team has been tremendous in the way they’ve performed and seamlessly adapted as we’ve continued to scale up and gone through our recent acquisition by Independent Clinical Services (ICS). We couldn’t have hoped for better backers than ICS, whose shared values and investment enable us to continue meeting demand in new markets and diversify the range of services we are able to provide to the sciences industry.”  APSCo is a leading recruitment industry body that celebrates its 20th year in business this year. It holds its Annual Awards for Excellence to recognise professional standards and all-round performance across the staffing sector. These Awards are considered the most prestigious accolade in professional recruitment, acting as a unique indicator of professional standards. The Award for Recruitment Company with the Most Sustainable Growth is awarded to the company that has shown consistent growth over the past 5 years whilst demonstrating the professional values and exceptional performance associated with APSCo membership.  About Proclinical  Proclinical offers an extensive suite of solutions – Proclinical Staffing, Proclinical Executive, Proclinical Consulting and Proclinical Engage – to help good life science partners grow. By forming long-term partnerships with individuals, teams, and whole organisations, we can provide support at every stage of the life science progress so that they can bring about a positive impact on global health. 

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Proclinical host a panel discussion with senior HR leaders

(VIDEO) Growing Your Life Science Business in a Talent-Short Market

   When critical positions in any life sciences organisation remain vacant, innovation can be severely impacted. This is a reality that many employers across the industry face right now. Keeping up with an ever-changing landscape, where experts in certain areas can be few and far between is a challenge for many and this is significantly amplified when the business is undergoing rapid growth. What can managers and talent acquisition teams do to address the challenges of a talent-short market? Proclinical were joined at the 2019 LEAP HR Life Sciences Conference in Boston, Massachusetts by an expert panel with a wealth of knowledge and experience in tackling these challenges: Nicole Barna (VP Head of Human Resources, Codiak Biosciences), Donna Vieraitis (Head of Human Resources, Servier Pharmaceuticals) and Carolyn Pastore (Director, Talent Acquisition and Human Resources, Blueprint Medicines). Watch the video of our discussion on how life science companies can overcome internal and external challenges to expand their businesses internationally. Our panellists address the daily challenges that HR and talent acquisition teams face, such as how to differentiate your organisation against others competing for the same individuals, their key considerations for entering international markets and ways to engage internal stakeholders to align processes, culture and values. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'b067d5a2-f614-49b3-add3-d906762f610a', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Proclinical unveils momentous re-brand to represent its diverse suite of services

London, Thursday 8th August, 2019 Last week, life science specialist HR and consulting services provider, Proclinical, unveiled its bold new look to employees and partners globally. The company’s new identity, featuring a colourful suite of endorsed offer brands, is a result of many years’ growth and a quickly evolving range of services that had previously been underrepresented.   Better known for its rapidly expanding recruitment offering across the US, Europe and Asia-Pacific regions, in recent years Proclinical has been diversifying its range of services to include end-to-end consulting, project management and executive search. This has enabled them to better serve the increasing demand from companies in the growing industries of biotechnology, MedTech and medical devices across the globe.   These momentous changes led the life science specialists to embark on a journey to reassess and rejuvenate its core identity and purpose to align with its present and future. The company’s suite of services are now identified as distinct sub-brands; Proclinical Staffing and Proclinical Executive still represent the company’s well-established recruitment business, while emerging sub-brands Proclinical Engage and Proclinical Consulting mark its dedication to providing more in-depth, comprehensive solutions to some of their life science partners’ biggest challenges.   To represent its complete offering to life science companies globally, the Proclinical Group purpose now proudly states: To help good life science partners grow.   Proclinical’s Head of Marketing, Peter Hogg, explained, “The challenge was in containing our full business offering within a cohesive brand structure and articulating a clear message both internally and externally about who we are and what we do. Before entering the next stage of our growth, we felt that this required us to redefine our purpose, our proposition, our values and our brand architecture.   Whether we are consulting on a product launch, staffing a new international manufacturing facility or helping an individual to take the next step in their career, growth is the essence of why we do what we do, and partnerships embodies the way we do it – through focusing on long-term, collaborative relationships, based on expertise and understanding. It also highlights our position as enablers - dedicated to helping our partners work more efficiently so they have more space to grow, innovate and save lives.  The use of the word good is very deliberate and adds an ethical note to Proclinical’s positioning that has always been there but was never truly celebrated. It nods to the company’s commitment to be selective about partnering only with companies who we consider to be good employers, with good products and a good reputation.”  Proclinical has created a re-brand overview illustrating their journey as well as a more detailed look into each of the individual sub-brands.   About Proclinical  Proclinical helps to fuel the growth of the life sciences industry globally. Their staffing and consulting partnerships enable good companies to work better, so they can innovate and change lives. Proclinical offers their life science partners a range of services including strategic project management, executive search and specialist recruitment.  

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3 steps to an effective job hunt in the life science industry

Only 5% of applicants are called in for an interview, a recent study suggests. Finding the job you want in the life science industry can be tricky, thanks to very competitive landscape. There are three main stages of finding a job - preparing, applying for and securing the job.At Proclinical we live and breathe the process of job searching. We are truly experts at what to do, what not to do, and have picked up many tips on how the best professionals carry out a successful job hunt. Have a look at each section to see how you can maximise your chances of getting the job you want.1. Research and preparationThis stage is mostly about ensuring that you are putting your best foot forward from the beginning. Life science jobs are competitive and you’ll have to beat out a lot of other experienced candidates in the early stages of your application.UpdateBe sure to fully update your most recent experience any new skills you have gained in your current role. Taking time to showcase your key attributes helps busy HR personnel and hiring managers see immediately to what extent you are qualified for the job. This is a huge advantage as they are likely to skim read your CV/resume and if important information is not present or easily seen, this will affect your chances of getting an interview.  Customise For highly specialist roles, of which there are so many in life sciences, there is nothing worse than a generic CV or resume. Each company is unique, working with different materials and technologies in various therapeutic areas. HR and hiring managers will want to see very specific examples of how your skills and experience will advance the technologies, specialisms and processes that drive their company. Filtering out irrelevant skills and experiences will streamline your CV and ensure you look like the ideal person for the job.Optimise In this instance, we mean optimizing your application for the various technologies that it may pass through. Most likely an ATS system. These highly efficient systems will scan through your CV/resume looking for pre-programmed key words and phrases that match the job description in question. If these keywords, phrases and acronyms aren’t written in a recognisable way you risk your key skills and experience not registering with the ATS, sending your application to the bottom of the pile. Over half of candidates are eliminated for a job via the ATS system if they don’t match the job description.Here are a few common CV/resume writing mistakes to avoid!Review your online presence:So much of the job hunting process happens online. That’s why it’s crucial to make sure that you are presenting yourself well on both job searching AND social media platforms. You can count on prospective employers googling you once they receive your job application or just before they reach out to you. Would you be happy with what comes up on your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc.? Either keep these social feeds free from appropriate pictures, a lot of bad language and ravings over sensitive subjects or take time to make them private! 70% of employers say that they turned down candidates because they discovered something negative or inappropriate online.LinkedInSometimes the best job come to you. Recruiters or a company’s talent acquisition may conduct their own searches and approach you with an opportunity. This saves you a lot of hassle of trolling through job sites/boards and almost guarantees you an interview. However, only the best candidates are approached like this. Aside from updating and optimising their CV, these professionals have taken care in creating and maintaining professional profiles. This could be their profile on a job board, or more likely - on LinkedIn.LinkedIn is a great way to broadcast the best bits of your CV/resume in a fully optimised profile that can be seen by an array of recruiters and employers. Around 95% of recruiters use social media to advertise job opportunities, and 70% of employers are using social networks to screen potential hires.2. Applying for jobsAre you looking in the right places?Job boardsAside from the major job boards like Indeed, Glassdoor and Monster there are a number of life science specific job boards that you may have come across. Some of the most prominent life science job boards include PharmiWeb, CareerBuilder, New Scientist, Emed and Biospace, and you’ll find a great deal of opportunities here. However, to refine your job search even more, you can seek out job boards that are specific to your field or specialism.Applying directlyIt is thought that as many as 80% of jobs are not posted on industry job boards or social media. Therefore, you may gain advantage by making a list of companies you want to work for and apply directly via their website.NetworkingBetter yet, do some homework and work out who the key decision makers or hiring managers are in your field within your ideal company and begin networking with them. LinkedIn is a great tool for network - another good reason to set up a profile. Generally, networking adds another string to your bow when searching for jobs that may not be publicly advertised. Here’s some top tips on how to network for jobs in the life science industry.RecruitmentA proportion of jobs not advertised online will be assigned to recruitment and staffing companies to help companies find the specialist skills and experience they need. These specialist staffing agencies build up networks of these professionals to call upon when they match the job description. Bear in mind that if you are approached by a recruiter that the job may be exclusively available through their agency so it is certainly worth considering.Finding a job through a recruitment company can also simplify your job hunt significantly and can increase your chances of being put forward for an interview. We’ve outlined a few reasons why you should consider using a specialist life science recruitment agency to enhance your job search.  3. Getting the jobOnce you’ve successfully made the 5% invited for an interview, it’s your chance to convince them you’re the best candidate. To actually get a job takes so much more than having the right qualifications and experience, and meeting your prospective employers in person is the opportunity to showcase everything else you can bring to the role.We could reel off a long list of what not to do in a life science interview but instead we’ve got some key points on what to expect, how to prepare and some important things to remember during the interview.Preparation is kingPreparation should go beyond researching the company’s history and products. Spend time understanding their unique medicines, technologies, indications and therapies and what drives them to save and improve patients’ lives. It’s important to remember that this sense of purpose is an important part of what fuels the life science industry.To show an even wider understanding, be sure to research the current market (whether pharma, biotech, medical devices etc.). Try to identify trends and forces that may be influencing or causing changes in the market.Also, give the impression of being prepared by bringing along a copy of your CV/resume, a notepad to make notes, and even a few of your own pre-written notes to refer to during the interview. This may strike you as strange, but an interview is not an exam. Having some key points written down or even some questions you wanted to ask is a great way to stay on track and ensure you get all the information you need.Appearance and body languageWhile your interviewer will certainly be looking for well thought out answers to questions, they’re also on the lookout for a professional appearance and composed body language. Some light hearted pleasantries at the beginning of the interview won’t go amiss, adding to the impression that you are calm and collected.Remember not to talk over your interviewers, speak abruptly to any administrative staff before/after the interview and most importantly, avoid speaking about your previous employers in a negative light.Answering questionsYou can never know exactly which questions you are going to be asked, but preparing for common interview questions is a good start. Prepare answers around the specific therapy area or field of science that may be involved in the role you are applying for.Competency-based questions are common so it’s advisable to brush up on some frequently asked questions. It’s worth following the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) framework when preparing potential questions, and also in the moment when you’re answering. A quick note on answering questions you’re not prepared for - try not to get flustered, instead taking a few moments to process and formulate something as relevant as possible. As a general rule, interviewers will appreciate a slight pause because launching into your answer as it shows that you are giving it due consideration instead of reeling off memorised answers.Asking questionsInterviewers will expect you to have a few questions of your own. There is likely a lot information you will want to gather as you are also assessing whether the position is right for you. Asking considered, targeted questions shows you’re interested, engaged and focused on the company and role.Here’s some ideas on questions to ask before, during and after an interview!Going for a management role? Here’s some specific advice if you’re preparing for a management interview.Are you a contractor? For some insight and bunch of tips on interviewing for life science contract positions, download our comprehensive Contractors Interview Guidebook today! <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '2a6fe3dc-c357-4095-b46f-69cb8c58ba43', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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How to spot a great candidate at interview

There’s a unique challenge that comes with hiring a new employee. Often, this position will be time-sensitive, usually in response to resignation or company expansion. The life sciences industry is currently in an exciting, if tumultuous, era of fast expansion, high turnover, and career progression that leaves employers frequently pressured to employ candidates at a much faster rate. However, given the important of the work in the life sciences industry, many employers may not give themselves time to thoroughly screen candidates in their searches for new hires. Whilst it’s important to find a new person quickly, it’s also important to find the right person. Luckily, there are a few ways of quickly and efficiently scouting out candidates during interviews, helping employers go from hiring a ‘good enough’ candidate to a great candidate. Composure Firstly, it’s important to pay attention to each candidate’s behaviour during interviews. This can cover everything from the words and phrases they use, how they hold themselves, to the way they talk to various team members. A calm, confident interviewee will be open without being over familiar – suggesting self-awareness rather than cockiness. Pay particular attention to the questions they ask – a keen mind is a valuable gain as well as an indication to what you can expect of them as they work for you. Anything about your company’s recent awards or events, or how the role might change over the course of the tenure, indicates not only a keen interest in the job, but both that they have prepared for this interview and are showing commitment to the role. It’s equally important to look at how they interact over the course of the interview. Does the conversation stay respectful and formal, or does it devolve into a more casual, ‘matey’ vibe as the meeting goes on? Someone who loses sight of the formality of the situation can be someone who will have trouble respecting authority if they’re hired. The ideal candidate will be friendly and jovial, but without stepping into pre-emptive familiarity. What makes them stand out? During the screening process, you’ll come across many candidates whose CVs look similar. Of course, it’s to be expected that in the life sciences industry, you’ll encounter a lot of graduates from life science degrees who have since gone on to work in life science jobs. However, when faced with multiple versions of the same applicant, how can you figure out which of these candidates will be the stand-out? Look at how they enhance their CV. What additional skills have they got that they can bring to the role? Beyond that, what steps have they taken to improving their already earned experience? Do they keep up to date with current life sciences trends and news? Most importantly, look for results on their CV. If they can prove that they were not only successful in their fields, but what the impact of their success was, they’re a keeper. Alternative experience/transferable skills It’s easy to dismiss candidates who come from non-life science fields, but a closer inspection will show that this injection of a foreign element might be just what your company needs. Whilst we can’t reasonably expect a finance manager to suddenly be able to regulate drugs (though we may be surprised!), we can expect that their experience in an unorthodox role will have transferable benefits to your company. Experience in leading a group or providing information is universal, but the way to go about these experiences can be radically different from field to field. By coming at challenges with a fresh viewpoint, a candidate can provide dynamic and innovative solutions to what otherwise might be a stagnant pool of employees. Cultural fit Cultural fit is often touted as a vital part of the candidate screening process. It’s indisputably important that a company’s employees benefit from having similar values and sets of behaviours, especially in a highly cooperative team environment. However, this has a serious drawback – stagnation. When a team is all pulled from the same pool, it can become very insular and struggle to change or adapt in response to the world around them. The concept of the cultural fit can be a hindrance as much as a benefit. This is where hiring someone outside of the cultural fit can be a real advantage. Diversity in the workforce, across gender, race, background, etc., along with mentality and outlook on the industry, can shakeup an otherwise ‘cookie cutter’ team. Trust your recruitment partner New statistics from Quarsh indicate that over 70% of in-house solutions fail to source all, or even 90% of their vacancies themselves. This staggering number makes sense in the pharmaceutical industry, where many positions require specialist, highly trained professionals to take on the role. By passing on the task of candidate sourcing to recruiters, you can guarantee that the applicants who make it to your interviews are already the best of the best. Trust in these recruiters, who spend their entire days searching for the perfect match for their assigned roles. In many cases, recruiters will retain CVs that stood out, but weren’t right for other roles, that will be a perfect match for your position. Proclinical is a specialist life science staffing company that can help you identify a pool of top-tier professionals for any role, even those with the most niche skill sets. If you've got a hard-to-fill vacancy or perhaps a project that requires a team of specialists, get in touch with us to discuss your requirements. Alternatively, you can download our e-book on how to drive engagement through your recruitment process, which has a detailed examination on interviewing life science candidates to ensure maximum productivity and commitment to your company.  <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '2a6fe3dc-c357-4095-b46f-69cb8c58ba43', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Top 10 gene therapy companies in 2019

Gene therapy is one of the most cutting-edge medical technologies in 2019. Instead of tried and tested treatments like drugs or surgery, gene therapy, also known as genetic modification or gene editing, inserts sections of DNA into a patient’s cells to correct damaged or abnormal genes. Tackling diseases on a genetic level could prove to be the long-awaited breakthrough for patients suffering with various rare and hereditary diseases. With untold potential, gene therapy could also lead the way to finding a universal cure for cancer, HIV and heart disease - some of the leading causes of death today. In no particular order, below are some of the most exciting and innovative biotechnology companies leading the way in the cell and gene therapy field. Each company offers a unique technology or mechanism that are becoming some of the most significant advancements in gene therapy medication.  Spark Therapeutics Spark Therapeutics is a gene therapy company founded in 2013 to find a treatment for rare diseases. Current in the pipeline are experimental drugs for a number of specific, rare genetic diseases such as haemophilia, haemophilia B, Pompe disease, Batten disease and choroideremia. In 2018, the company gained their first approval from the FDA for Luxturna, a gene therapy that treats children and adults with a rare eye disease that usually causes total blindness. This was a real milestone as it was the first ever treatment approved for this particular rare disease. In 2019, global top 10 pharma Roche began making plans to acquire Spark for around $4.8 billion. With the support of a new parent company, the innovative gene therapy company will be set to go from strength to strength.AlnylamFounded in 2002, Alnylam is currently one of the leading developers of RNAi for the treatment of rare genetic diseases. After 16 years of research, the company gained regulatory approval of Onpattro in August 2018, a therapy for patients with a fatal rare disease transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis. The therapy made quite a splash as the first of a new class of drugs to be approved. It signalled a potential to begin treating disease by targeting the root cause, which could lead to the halting or reversing of the condition instead of treating symptoms or delaying progression.  Alnylam is currently using their novel RNAi platform to develop treatments for a very broad range of diseases including haemophilia, hypercholesterolemia, rare liver disease and hypertension. ArrowHead RNA Interference (RNAi) is one of the most exciting recent discoveries in genetics, leading to Andrew Z. Fire and Craig C. Mello being awarded the Nobel prize in 2006. ArrowHead, one of the leading companies in RNAi-based therapies, has developed a very promising RNAi-based platform called TRiMTM. The platform leverages the natural pathways of ‘gene-silencing’ which targets and shuts down disease-causing genes in cells. The technology is promising as it offers the possibility of use a broad range of genes and proteins in many different disease pathways. In 2018, ArrowHead’s intriguing gene-silencing Hepatitis B drug caught the attention of Johnson & Johnson’s subsidiary Janssen and led to a substantial investment and the option to collaborate on more RNAi drugs in future. ArrowHead has also collaborated with Amgen to apply it’s RNAi platform to develop heart disease therapies. SQZ Biotechnologies SQZ Biotechnologies is an innovative gene and cell therapy company that develops therapies for various cancers and autoimmune diseases that are notoriously difficult to treat. The unique SQZ platform takes cell engineering to new heights as it uses a technique called ‘squeezing’ to transfer materials within cells with as little impact to the healthy cells as possible. Back in 2015, SQZ partnered with Roche to combine their innovative platform with Roche’s oncology expertise, and are now expanding their collaboration to further SQZ’s lead program in antigen presenting cells (APCs). SQZ also has a promising program that uses similar mechanisms to shut-down harmful immune responses caused by autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes. AveXis Clinical-stage gene therapy company AveXis develops therapies for rare neurological genetic diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Rett Syndrome and inherited forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These are rare but utterly devastating diseases, resulting in severe motor capabilities and even death. Currently, there are very few effective treatment options available for these types of neurodegenerative diseases. In 2018, the company was acquired by Novartis, one of the leading pharmaceutical companies in Europe, to further their SMA candidate AVXS-101 which has just received regulatory approval by the FDA. If successful, the therapy will be a one-time treatment to prevent further muscle degeneration by SMA which would transform their quality of life. Askepios BioPharmaceutical (AskBio) Established at the University of North Carolina, AskBio was founded in 2001 to build on the work of Dr Richard Jude Samulski, the former Director of the university’s gene therapy center. The innovative company focuses on developing therapies for patient populations with rare and mostly untreatable genetic muscular and neurological diseases. Samulski was the first scientist to clone Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) with Dr Xiao Xiao and Sheila Mikhail. This is a unique mechanism that harnesses viruses and uses their natural ability to delivery genetic material to cells to correct and repair faulty or diseases cells. The benefits of this discovery is no pathologicity (harm to patients from virus vector), long-erm gene expression, ease of genetic manipulation and very low immune response from patients. Thanks to the exciting and promising nature of the AAV gene therapy mechanism, AskBio has recently received a rush of investment from TPG Capital and Vida Ventures to propel the development of therapies in several therapeutic areas. Cellectis Cellectis is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company that was set-up in 1999 to develop alternative gene editing therapies to cure cancer. CAR-T immunotherapy is currently a hot topic on the oncology scene but needs to be customised for each individual patient, which is both time-consuming and expensive. Cellectis is introducing a cost-effective ‘off-the-shelf’ product that uses gene-edited allogenic CAR T-cells to create a simple, universal therapy that will be ready-made for patients everywhere.  The company has branded these products ‘UCARTs’ and currently there are several variations in the development pipeline to treat different types of cancer, including leukaemia and lymphoma.   Pluristem Founded in 2001 in Israel, Pluristem works with human placental cells to treat patients with inflammation, heart disease, muscle injuries, blood disorders and radiation damage. The cell therapy company uses a highly innovative 3D platform to efficiently manufacture large quantities of cells for their stem-cell products. In 2019, the company announced its development of a serum-free formulation that will transform the manufacturing of cell therapy products, helping the industry move towards serum-free production. RegenexBio RegenexBio’s ground-breaking NAV Technology platform caught the attention of the industry when it showed the potential to be applied to a wide range of disease across many therapy areas. The technology uses new generation adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to carry genetic material to cells to correct underlying genetic defects. In May 2019, the company received regulatory approval for Zolgensma, a one-time AAV therapy to treat children under two with SMA. RegenexBio has a number of orphan drugs and rare paediatrician drugs in their pipeline, for retina, neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases. Bluerock Therapeutics The main aim of Bluerock Therapeutics is to tackle hard to control degenerative disease to help improve quality of life for patients around the world. Instead of using controversial embryonic stem cells, Bluerock use induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) therapies which are developed from adult tissues. The miracle of this method is that iPSC can grow indefinitely and is able to grow into any type of cell in the body. BlueRock is currently using their CELL+GENETM  platform to develop cellular treatments in the areas of neuology, cardiology and immunology. Heart disease is a leading cause of death and the company is currently tackling the issue of cell loss that often prevents patients from recovering following a heart attack. Blue Rock is also focusing on Parkinson’s disease, a prevalent neuro-degenerative disease that affects millions across the globe. Their innovative platform hopes to reverse degeneration and restore motor function to patients, greatly improving their quality of life. Interested in working for an innovative gene therapy company? Proclinical is a consulting and staffing services provider that partners with a range of cell and gene therapy companies from cutting-edge start ups to well established biotechs. See here for our latest gene therapy biotech jobs.  <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '2a6fe3dc-c357-4095-b46f-69cb8c58ba43', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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7 steps to taking control of your continuous professional development

Having a job that you can take pride in can seem like a lofty goal. Finding fulfilment in one’s work can be difficult, especially if you’re feeling stagnant in your current position. The concept of professional development can gradually become a foreign one, as future career paths seem erased by the various issues causing a lack of motivation in your job.A lack of motivation can stem from anything, from having exhausted every avenue your work offers to feeling swamped down with additional tasks and responsibilities that are irrelevant to what you actually want to do. It may even be that your focus is elsewhere as your environment no longer stimulates you. Whatever the case, it is possible to begin taking control over your continuous professional development through the steps below.Re-shift your focusYou must first ask yourself why you feel like you need development. What has occurred in your professional history that has taken you to this point? You may feel like you have achieved everything you possibly could have. Perhaps you’ve been in a role for a long enough time that it no longer stimulates or gratifies you. It may simply be that the additional job responsibilities you have overshadow the tasks you enjoy. Reminding yourself where your focus should be will allow you to take control over your personal development.By questioning not only why you have taken this role, but also why you have stayed in it, you can map out the path you want to take to progress it. Ask yourself the following questions:Do the benefits of staying in your job outweigh the negatives?Does this position still offer you what you were seeking when you first took on the role?Have your own needs and priorities changed since you began this position?If you have lost sight of what makes this job worth it to you, realising what will make it worth it will allow you to revitalise your professional development.Ask for new responsibilitiesAsking for more work might seem exhausting or counter-intuitive, but new duties can provide you with a focal point with which to focus on professional development. By taking on a new responsibility, you will naturally have to adjust your approach to work in order to fit it in your work structure. While you may not be able to eschew other responsibilities, having a new task that stimulates you can be enough to outweigh the negatives. It may also be a chance to learn a new skill through your new work.Learn new skillsWhether it’s through an office-supported scheme, or an ‘after-school’ undertaking, taking a course to develop a new professional skill can revitalise your motivation and development path, allowing you to bolster your career. Beginning a new course can be as simple as talking to your manager and will allow you to add new talents to your roster.Track your current achievementsMapping down your current achievements and successes will allow you to pinpoint your exact location in your pathway to development. Working with your manager to assign yourself new goals can be a good way to reignite your carer progression, as is taking notes from both senior and junior co-workers around you. Ask yourself the following questions:Do your seniors seem to have the scope of work that you want? If so, how have they achieved this? What steps did they take to reach this point?Alternatively, what inspired your junior co-workers to take the positions they currently have?Are your colleagues’ motivations similar to yours when you began? What career paths do they want to take?Get inspired by your colleagues, as you may discover new avenues to explore that you hadn’t noticed before.Transfer rolesIn some cases, your environment may still stimulate or nurture you, even whilst your job itself does not. Rather than leaving the company, it is worth looking into your current skill-set. Of your capabilities, which are transferable into another role?By following an unorthodox turn in your career path, you can utilise your current skill-set in a dynamic and innovative way, or develop new skills and capabilities, allowing for a flourish in personal development.If it is simply your role that is causing stagnation, then there may not be a reason to leave your office. Simply changing your scope of work can be enough to progress your professional development in a familiar, nurturing environment.Seek out new environmentsIf a current job has no more areas to explore or succeed in, or if a lack of stimulation has made it a grind, it may no longer be able to offer you what it once did. It may be hard to see this, as sentimentality and familiarity can be traps, keeping workers from progressing further down their career paths.Leaving may have some negative consequences. To some extent, professional development might be stunted by the adjustment period in a new job. It may be that your new environment might not be the fit for you that you’d hoped. The problem with taking a large risk is that it may not always pay off. However, without taking the risk, you may be condemning yourself to stay in an unsatisfying position.Getting a new job can be a rewarding experience that will boost your professional development. Whether it’s the chance to better utilise honed corporate skills, the chance to learn new skills, or simply the discovery of a new professional purpose, beginning a new position away from what you know can be exactly what it is needed in reigniting motivation and personal development. NetworkTo achieve this change, it is vital to network. Attending industry events can offer an initial opportunity to expand your contact list. Connect with managers who can point out places your strengths can be utilised and reach out to recruiters who can put you in touch with companies that will able to properly harness these strengths. Even if you're not quite ready to find a new job, start a conversation with one of our specialist consultants. They'll talk you through what you need to do to progress in your specialist field and even give you some insider industry tips. 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The top 10 medical device companies (2019)

18 Advanced issues found▲14Medical devices is one of the fastest growing areas within life sciences. This broad industry develops all manner of devices from diagnostics and medical imaging machines to surgical instruments and orthopaedics. With the high level of technological advancement over recent years, sub-sectors such as health technology – where medical devices meet innovative software technology – have grown exponentially. The last 12 months have seen some impressive growth in the medical device sector, mostly due to investment in health technology and artificial intelligence, and Proclinical has compiled the following list of the current top 10 medical device companies in the world, ranked by their 2018 revenue: Stryker $13.6 billion Stryker is a US-based medical technology company that develops joint replacements, surgical equipment, medical machinery, neurosurgical and spinal devices among many others across its varied portfolio. The fortune 500 company enjoyed 9.3% overall revenue growth in 2018, as well as strong growth across all three business segments: Orthopaedics (5.9%) MedSurg (8.6%) and Neurotechnology & Spine (18%). Company sales in 2019 are expected to grow between 6- 6.5%. Siemens Healthineers $15.4 billion (€13.4bn) Siemens Healthineers is the medical technology branch of the German automation and electrics conglomerate Siemens. The company develops medical devices and technology for a wide range of therapy areas, with particular focus on medical imaging and diagnostics. There was a slight decline in revenue of 2% compared with end of 2018 figures, however, there was significant growth by region, namely Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Revenue increases are mostly attributed to a growth in sales of the company’s diagnostic imagining business thanks to the acquisition of Fast Track Diagnostics in January 2018. Cardinal Health $15.6 billion Multinational health care company, Cardinal Health, has a booming medical device segment that experienced an impressive 15% increase in revenue in 2018. The company supplies wound care, laboratory, surgical and home healthcare products to over 100 countries worldwide. Cardinal Health attributes the growth to the success of their post-acute (rehabilitation or palliative care) and branded products such as Cordis. The company’s acquisitions of Medronic’s Patient Care, Deep Vein Thrombosis and Nutritional Insufficiency business in 2017 have really boosted their medical device business. Abbott Laboratories $18.9 billion American life science company Abbott Laboratories is a world leader in developing medical devices in vascular disease, diabetes and vision care. The company’s medical device segment grew by 10.1% compared with 2017 figures and the diagnostics segment was the highest performing in 2018. In January 2019, Abbott acquired medical device firm Cephea Valve Technologies, a company that develops minimally invasive heart valve replacement technology - this could eliminate the need for open-heart surgery. Fresenius $18.92 billion (€16.5 billion) At the close of 2018, Fresenius Medical Care reported that it achieved strong revenue growth of 7%. The company also saw healthy growth across its key segments: Dialysis Services, Health Care Products and Care Coordination and its key global markets. In 2019, a lot of focus will be on expanding their network in China, an important emerging market. Fresenius’ revenue growth is due to high sales of dialysers, machines and peritoneal dialysis products, and in part to the acquisition of Cura Day Hospitals in April 2017 which has significantly contributed to its Care Coordination segment. GE Healthcare $19.8 billion In 5th place on Proclinical’s list, GE Healthcare’s revenue grew from $19.1 billion in 2017 to $19.78 billion in 2018, a respectable and steady increase of 4%. The medical device company is a subsidiary of General Electric, but the company has plans to establish GE Healthcare as a separate entity in the near future. Its growth this year has been attributed to emerging markets such as South East Asia and Latin America, and an increase in sales of Health Care Systems and imaging products. GE Healthcare prepares to go from strength to strength by investing heavily in artificial intelligence medical platforms and solutions. Philips Healthcare $20.7 billion (€18.1 billion) Philips Healthcare enjoyed modest but steady growth of 5% in 2018. The medical technology company is a subsidiary of the multinational technology conglomerate Philips, and prides itself on becoming a leader in the health technology sector. Its diagnostic imaging and personal heath segments did particularly well in 2018, and the digital pathology sector also enjoyed rapid growth. In 2018, Philips Healthcare took strategic steps to strength its position moving forward with a number of acquisitions, including EPD Solutions, Remote Diagnostic Technologies, NightBalance and Blue Willow Systems. Thermo Fisher Scientific $24.4 billion American biotechnology and medical device company, Thermo Fisher Scientific, enjoyed an impressive 16% growth on 2017 figures. Their Analytical Instruments and Speciality Diagnostics segments did particularly well, growing by 11% and 7% respectively. In September 2018, the company signed an agreement with Becton Dickinson to acquire their Advanced BioProcessing and most recently in March 2019, Thermo Fisher Scientific entered into the gene therapy manufacturing market. DePuy Synthes (Johnson & Johnson) $27 billion 2nd on the top 10 list of medical device companies is Johnson and Johnson’s medical device subsidiary, DePuy Synthes. The company develops and manufacture products in various therapy areas: orthopaedic, cardiovascular, diabetes, vision care and surgery. Worldwide medical device sales increased by 1.5% and the primary contributors included high sales in the following areas: surgical vision, wound closure, biosurgery and electrophysiology. Medtronic $29.9 billion Medtronic is the top medical device company in the world for 2019 with an impressive annual revenue nearly $30 billion in 2018. The company experienced 1% increase in revenue compared with 2017 figures and they reported growth across all groups and regions. Revenue increases is also due in part to its acquisition of Mazor Robotics in late 2018, which was considered the biggest orthopaedic deal of the year.Proclinical works with many of these leading medical device companies worldwide. If you are interested in jobs in the medical devices industry, simply send us your CV and our specialist consultants will match you with suitable medical device roles as and when they arise. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '2a6fe3dc-c357-4095-b46f-69cb8c58ba43', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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ProClinical Switzerland

Proclinical AG moves Swiss operations to state-of-the-art Grosspeter Tower

21st May 2019 - Basel, SwitzerlandAt the end of May 2019, Proclinical AG, the company’s Swiss operation moved to a new location in Basel. The office move is a result of the company’s rapidly expanding business in this region and increasing demand for skilled R&D professionals from leading Swiss-based pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical, medical device and clinical research organisations. The new offices in the state-of-the-art Grosspeter Tower boast a spectacular view over the city of Basel. In the distance, the ‘Dreiländereck’ can be seen, which is the tri-point where the borders of France, Germany and Switzerland meet. The new location also brings the team closer to some of their most important and valued clients, as the impressive Roche Tower and expansive Novartis campus can easily be seen from the offices. The offices are a great place for candidates, clients and employees alike to enjoy a coffee and some spectacular views of the city.  John Bowler, Proclinical AG’s General Manager, is delighted to have moved into the Grosspeter Tower, “This milestone relocation really reflects the success story of our business here in Switzerland over the past few years. The new office means we have more room to accommodate our clientele and expand our innovative service lines to continuously improve our capabilities for life science candidates and clients in these regions.” With the surge of success, Proclinical AG looks further strengthen its reputation in the market as an industry leading staffing provider. About ProclinicalProclinical is a leading global staffing services provider that specialises exclusively within the life sciences industry. Our client base includes leading global pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, medical device and health tech pioneers, and associated life science companies, including CROs and the outsourcing sector.

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Alex Czuprynski: From Intern to Team Lead

Alex Czuprynski began his career at Proclinical as an intern/placement year student while studying for his biomedical science degree. After a successful year, Alex returned to Proclinical when he completed university in 2016 - but not before a few months of travelling! Thanks to the experience he accumulated during his placement year, Alex skipped the entry associate level and returned as a fully-fledged consultant. In the three years since, he has thrived at Proclinical, having been promoted consistently from consultant through to senior consultant, principal consultant and finally his current position as team lead of Regulatory Affairs. Here’s a bit of insight into Alex’s experiences and career progression over the years at Proclinical: What was your placement year like? For the first three months it was quite an adjustment. I’d previously never worked in an office environment before, so it was tricky getting used to working in front of a computer and getting on the phones. But the training was really good. I was assigned to the Regulatory Affairs recruitment team and had a mentor to guide me through a structured learning development process. Luckily there was no huge pressure to make placements right away. Proclinical was good at giving me time to find my stride as I had a slow start. I didn’t make a placement for 4 months! With some help from my mentor and other team members I quickly found my way, making multiple placements and earning commission. What attracted you to Proclinical for your placement year? Much like other life science graduates, I was disaffected by working in a laboratory during the summer. I found it quite boring and repetitive, and it was quite poorly paid in comparison to other sectors. I had never considered recruitment as an option but after finding out more I saw that it was a happy medium for me. It was a chance to continue working in the life science industry whilst having an interesting, variable day-to-day job.  Ultimately, I applied for a placement year at Proclinical because it was something a little bit different, but I also felt like I was putting my scientific knowledge to really good use. What does recruitment offer you that a career in industry wouldn’t? Generally speaking, recruitment can be challenging, but the career development offered to me was far superior than any of my other options. It’s clear what your targets are and what is required to progress, so it’s simply about getting down to it and doing what you need to get to the next wrung on the ladder. It’s also given me a financial sense of freedom and a great feeling of stability. The earning potential is uncapped, unlike with other jobs where there are defined salary bands. You’re the master of your own destiny when it comes to what you earn. I’ve also had the opportunity to travel around the world, visiting New York, South Africa and Iceland, most notably. Also, unlike a lot of scientific jobs where it’s difficult to focus on any other areas, in recruitment you have the opportunity to diversify. For example, I could go down a technical route because I’ve got the skillset to understand how a drug company works. I could also opt to work in-house at a life science company as a talent acquisition specialist, or even move into a consultancy. There aren’t too many avenues working in a scientific role, unless you’re much further on in your career. The most important draw for me however, is the variety recruitment provides in my day-to-day life. Instead of working on one scientific experiment or project in a lab, I’m working with such a broad range of life science companies with a huge variety of projects that span the entire spectrum of the life science industry. I’ve been exposed to some really interesting and ground-breaking work that our clients are undertaking. What have you found most challenging about recruitment? As I’ve said before, recruitment has its challenges. I found it tough at first to adjust to working full-time, being on the phone a lot and of course, the pressure of hitting targets. At university, I was used to pressure but it came in shorter bursts. In recruitment, the pressure is less intense but more constant. But it’s definitely what you need to keep motivated and to push yourself. I found targets and expectations quite daunting at first, but soon realised that targets are set according to your abilities and potential. Eventually I understood that they weren’t unrealistic or unachievable, and this was an important shift of mentality for me. What were your breakthrough moments? Definitely when I made my first placement. That’s when I felt like I’d cracked it, I understood how it worked - even though it took me a little longer than most. There was a huge sense of pride that I’d successfully managed a process from start to finish. When I brought in my first client, that was also a significant moment. A company genuinely wanted to work with Proclinical because of me and my ability to help them. That’s a rewarding feeling. Ultimately, becoming a team lead was a huge breakthrough. I realised I had the capabilities to advise and help others succeed, too. It’s so fulfilling to see your team member make a placement knowing that you’ve played a part in helping them get there. 10 reasons to consider a life sciences recruitment careerHow to get a job in recruitmentWhat makes a successful recruitment consultant? Were there transferable skills from your academic background that helped you in recruitment? Initially, I was concerned that I didn’t have any sales experience. But I soon realised I already had a lot of the skills I needed thanks to my academic/scientific background. For instance, I had to do a lot of presentations when I was studying and when working at the lab, and this has come in really useful as it taught me to speak clearly and concisely. These communication skills have enabled me to speak to different types of audiences - peers, candidates, hiring managers, HR and even CEOs of companies - which is key to success in this career. Also, sales experience isn’t necessary as long as you have the ability to understand and convey complex messages, which I certainly did thanks to my background. My scientific understanding and industry knowledge helps clients and candidates alike to trust that I really know what I’m doing. Any tricks of the trade? The one thing that recruiters don’t always do that they should is learn how to build genuine relationships with people. That’s what helps you stand out against other recruiters. For example, when you take the time to develop a relationship with a candidate, it could span many months or even years. You could end up helping them climb their own career ladder as someone they trust and genuinely want to continue working with. It’s the same with clients. Proclinical trains you to understand that the services we offer are a ‘value-add’ to their business, instead of a financial drain or a necessary evil. We’re taught to add the knowledge, experience and resources that the company doesn’t have, helping them to reach their goals more efficiently. So basically, grasping that recruitment is about good communication, striking up genuine relationships and being extremely organised will set you apart from the competition. Any advice to life science students/graduates considering recruitment? I really recommend it. I chose recruitment not because I didn’t have a passion for science anymore, but because it was a balance of everything for me. A varied, challenging job that kept me close (much closer than I thought) to the industry I was interested in. As I’ve progressed, I’ve actually felt more immersed in the industry than I did when I was doing lab work. For example, I recently went to Iceland to visit a client’s manufacturing facility to see how their drugs are developed. Recruitment is challenging but I’d choose it again every time because what you get back in return for your hard work far surpasses what I could expect working in industry. Are you currently studying or have recently graduated with a life science degree? Whether you dream of making a difference to people's lives, climbing the career ladder or having the opportunity to travel or relocate abroad, we can get you there. We provide real opportunities for consultants to progress and an excellent training and development programme to help boost you up the career ladder. Whether you dream of contributing to medical research or taking on leadership responsibility, you’ll have everything you need to make an impact.Think you've got what it takes to be a successful life sciences recruitment consultant? Find out more. About Proclinical:Proclinical is a leading international life sciences consultancy that helps experienced professionals find contract and permanent jobs, and provides life science companies with a range of solutions to fix business critical needs. Our clients include leading global brands and smaller emerging companies within pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices and clinical research.

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