tolaini test

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Biological Sciences, Laboratory Technician, Molecular Biology, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

North Chicago, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Biologist with a biopharmaceutical company located in North Chicago, IL.

Reference:

SC.CN.25260

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Biochemistry, Biological Sciences, Toxicology, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for an Analytical Development Scientist with a pharmaceutical company located in Cambridge, MA.

Reference:

SC.NR.25252

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Biochemistry, Biological Sciences, Immunology, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Tampa, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for an Analytical Development Director with a biopharmaceutical company located in Tampa, FL.

Reference:

SC.NR.25251

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Biotechnology, Permanent, Medical Writing, United Kingdom, Not Applicable
Location:

London, England

Description

A successful global medical organisation is looking for a Senior Medical Writer to join their dynamic team in London.

Reference:

35264

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Biotechnology, Permanent, Marketing, Singapore, Not Applicable
Location:

Singapore

Description

Proclincial is working with a pharmaceutical company that is searching for Marketing Manager to be based in Singapore.

Reference:

35262

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, All, Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, Permanent, Medical Communications, Medical Writing, Project Management, United States, Production, Sales, Training, Not Applicable
Location:

Los Angeles, USA

Description

Salary is generous, bonus is strong, opportunity is massive.

Reference:

MC.GA.35174

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, All, Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, Permanent, Medical Communications, Medical Writing, Account Management, United States, Production, Sales, Training, Not Applicable
Location:

New York, USA

Description

Proclinical is partnered with a wonderful, innovative Med Comms company and is proud to present this opportunity to join the American arm of this British agency.

Reference:

MC.GA.35168C

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, All, Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, Permanent, Medical Communications, Medical Writing, Account Management, United States, Production, Sales, Training, Not Applicable
Location:

Los Angeles, USA

Description

Proclinical is partnered with a wonderful, innovative Med Comms company and is proud to present this opportunity to join the American arm of this British agency.

Reference:

MC.GA.35168B

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, All, Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, Permanent, Medical Communications, Medical Writing, Account Management, United States, Production, Sales, Training, Not Applicable
Location:

San Francisco, USA

Description

Proclinical is partnered with a wonderful, innovative Med Comms company and is proud to present this opportunity to join the American arm of this British agency.

Reference:

MC.GA.35168

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, All, Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, Permanent, Senior/Director & VP, Officer /Associate, Project Manager, United States, Production, Quality Assurance, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Gaithersburg, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Director of Regulatory Project Management with global pharmaceutical company located in Gaithersburg, MD.

Reference:

RA.NW.35152

Infographic: Clinical research career path

How to grow your career in clinical research Clinical research is a competitive but growing field and provides rewarding career opportunities if you have qualifications or experience within life sciences. A career in clinical research involves conducting studies to ensure new treatments are safe and effective for patients. There are a variety of way to progress a career in the clinical research field with pharma, biotech, medical device companies and CROs all offering opportunities for professionals. Here we discover the what it takes to lead a fulfilling career in clinical research and the most common career pathways: Open the PDF version

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What is RNAi and how does it work

What is RNAi and how does it work?

At the start of the millennium, all eyes were focused on a revolutionary breakthrough in science known as RNA interference (RNAi). Companies saw its potential to transform the lives of people living with diseases for which there were limited or non-existent treatment options and began to invest heavily into researching this exciting medical advancement. However, it was not until 2018 that the first RNAi drug, Alnylam’s Onpattro (Patisiran) was approved to treat the rare condition, hereditary transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis, which is a slowly progressive illness that affects the body's organs and tissues and is caused by the build-up of a protein called amyloid. In an article by Labiotech, Brendan Martin, the Acting Head of Alnylam in Canada, the Middle East, and Europe, said “The past few years have seen recognition of RNAi come on leaps and bounds and the insights we have obtained from Onpattro and Givlaari are now fuelling a new chapter for this technology”. Here we take a closer look at how RNAi works and what potential it has to transform the future of healthcare and medicine. What is RNAi? RNA stands for ribonucleic acid, which is a nucleic acid present in all living cells. RNA interference (RNAi) is an innovative approach to specifically target and silence any gene involved in the cause or disease pathway. The small pieces of RNA that enable RNAi come in two different varieties: Small interfering RNA (siRNA) and MicroRNA (miRNA). How does RNAi work? RNA interference works in the same way for both siRNA and miRNA. Small RNA molecules come together to activate protein complexes. Once bound, they work to target mRNAs (messenger RNAs) to prevent ribosomes from continuing to synthesise the associated protein. As a result, production of the protein encoded by that mRNA is prevented. How does RNAi therapy work? RNAi shows a great deal of promise in molecular biology. The relationship between the target mRNA sequence and the sequence required for a functional siRNA or miRNA is deep-rooted and this allows scientists to synthesize interfering RNAs as needed. These RNAs then prevent protein synthesis in a more straightforward way than altering the genetic code. RNAi drug delivery is now widely used for treating infectious diseases, chronic metabolic disorders, cardiovascular, neurological, urological, oncological and ophthalmological disorders. RNAi based medicine usually comes in the form of an injection or a topical delivery method. It involves nanoparticle, pulmonary, nucleic acid and aptamer drug delivery technologies. These technologies are also used for analysing gene functions and developing gene silencing treatments. What are the benefits of RNAi therapeutics? An advantage of RNAi is the ability to design precisely targeted medicines for almost any gene, regardless of the function of the gene. This can make solutions for complex situations possible and help reduce the impact of side effects. Therapeutics based on RNA interference offer a powerful method for rapidly identifying specific disease targets. This offers a faster way, compared to traditional methods, of developing new novel ways of treating diseases. What are the opportunities for RNAi therapeutics? The global RNAi drug delivery market increased by 7% (CAGR) between 2014 and 2019 and it is expected to generate moderate growth over the next 5 years, with the need to reduce the prevalence of chronic medical and genetic disorders driving growth. The coronavirus pandemic, that spread across the world in 2020, has significantly increased the demand for RNAi drug delivery technologies. Targeted delivery methods are gaining traction for the administration of antiviral drugs as they are induced by small interfering RNA that can inhibit the expression of viral antigens. Furthermore, various advancements in technology, such as the development of innovative synthetic delivery carriers and bio-vectors, are expected to increase the demand for RNAi. The nanocarriers, including siRNA or microRNAs (miRNA) play a pivotal role in the development of precision medicines and identifying altered cellular molecules and metabolites. How do you think RNAi will shape the future of medicine? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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Global pharma, biometrics team build out

Global pharma, biometrics team build out Case study The overview A global pharmaceutical company partnered with us to build their in-house biometrics team. The challenge Our partner had previously outsourced their biometric work to CROs. However, following a recent investment, they wanted to build and implement an in-house team. The first key hire that they needed to make was a clinical data manager. They had been actively interviewing candidates for the role for over 4 months with no success. Their location wasn’t proving favourable for candidates and the talent pool of suitable candidates was very limited. The role required the candidate to work onsite, which is atypical of the usual requirements, so added further to the challenge. We also needed to develop a clear and effective narrative to take to market as our partner was not as well-known in the UK as some of their competitors. The solution We delivered this project on a retained search basis. This meant we offered a dedicated, expert project team who had an extensive network of suitable and qualified candidates across the UK and EU. We used our existing network and we utilised specialist recruitment tools such as LinkedIn Recruiter, giving us unrivalled access to the market, and worked with this partner to establish a strong narrative piece. We advised on salary and presented candidates at a variety of cost levels, which were reflective of their respective experiences. We had weekly meetings with the senior management team, providing regular updates and shortlists, which ensured our partner was always kept informed of how the search was progressing. We had a final shortlist of 6 candidates, of which 4 were interviewed. The outcome The final hire was successfully made with a candidate from a top 10 pharmaceutical company The project was delivered within agreed timeframes and budget We continue to partner with the organisation across their regulatory affairs division  

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Life sciences industry 2020 and 2021

The lasting impact of 2020 on the life science industry

As the world celebrated the dawn of a new decade, scientists in Wuhan, China were investigating the cause of an unexpected pneumonia outbreak. At the beginning of 2020, few could have foreseen what would unravel over the following twelve months. The response from the life science industry to the Covid-19 pandemic has been remarkable, adapting to extremely challenging conditions while stepping-up their efforts with a matter of urgency like never before. Here we reflect on the events of the last year and consider their lasting impact on the life science industry in 2021 and beyond. Digital transformation The outbreak of Covid-19 sparked a mass movement to digital systems, and in 2021 this will continue to become increasingly popular, accelerating the growth of telemedicine as the future of healthcare. From drug discovery and development through to manufacturing, conducting virtual clinical trials and patient treatment, technology will create new opportunities at every stage of the healthcare process. To stop the spread of the virus in workplaces, businesses across the world had to adapt to a new way of managing their workforce remotely. For the life sciences industry, many companies were highly responsive and agile in their practices. This included redeploying many medical professionals to focus on meeting demands of the fight against Covid-19. Numerous trial innovations were widely adopted to facilitate a safer way of working, including in-home nurse visits, telemedicine for trial visits, and digital tools for remote monitoring. Having been made to work from home, many people have experienced a work/life balance never before attainable – and are likely to want to maintain this flexibility. Life science professionals seeking new roles are likely to view home-working as standard rather than a perk. This shift towards working from home is largely seen to be beneficial, as the vast majority of employees enjoy and feel they are productive working remotely. According to a FlexJobs’ survey, 95% of respondents say that their productivity is higher or the same when working from home. With the demand for Covid-19 research, many pharmaceutical and medical device companies needed to quickly scale-up their workforce. Recruiters and life sciences companies had no choice but to embrace connecting with candidates through online tools, conducting video interviews and assessments remotely. Meeting candidates face to face is preferable for many employers but hiring someone remotely opens up the talent pool and gives employers access to a wider range of candidates, so going forward, digital methods of recruitment will likely be here to stay.mRNA vaccines When the pandemic unfolded, researchers from companies and universities around the globe were committed to speedily finding an effective vaccine. For over 30 years, various pharma companies have been researching and working to develop a simpler way of creating effective vaccines, that relied on the principle of understanding the exact structure of the mRNA. Once scientist had determined the structure of all of its genes, including the genes that make the spike protein, experts across the world were able to work on the design of an mRNA vaccine. In November 2020, several organizations announced positive results from interim analyses of their Phase III vaccine trials and in early December, the UK became the first country in the world to approve the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, with the first doses were administered to patients just days later. Rolling out a vaccine in just a matter of months is one of the biggest achievements for the life sciences industry in history. Pharma companies had to not just research ways of treating a novel disease but also manage complex supply chains, contend with new models for engagement with healthcare professionals, manage remote workforces, and deal with the disruption to many clinical trials. After the success of developing vaccines for Covid-19, mRNA now represents a promising alternative to traditional vaccines. mRNA vaccines are now being tested for treating other infectious diseases such as Ebola and influenza. Cancer cells also make proteins that can be targeted by mRNA vaccines and it is thought that the technology could produce proteins missing in diseases like cystic fibrosis.Impact on other therapy areas As well as delivering solutions for the Covid-19 pandemic, the life science industry also celebrated various other wins. The number of drug approvals coming from the FDA showed no signs of slowing down in 2020, with 49 novel drugs approved, among them a record number of oncology drugs. Notable approvals included; Tepezza, the first and only approved treatment for thyroid eye disease, Zeposia, a treatment for adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis and Trodelvy, an antibody-drug conjugate for metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. However, pausing life science research elsewhere to focus on dealing with Covid-19 has impacted funding and resources for many other projects in the pipeline. This is likely to affect the number of FDA drug approvals in 2021 and means patients suffering with various conditions may have to wait longer than hoped for life-changing solutions. Although it is widely thought that in the long-term, lessons learned from research during this pandemic could benefit the life sciences industry worldwide beyond the pandemic. Overall, the Covid-19 pandemic looks like it will continue to cause more uncertainty and challenges for the world this year. However, the life science industry remains strong and continues to focus on meeting the unmet needs of patients and combating all Covid-19.With 2020 behind us, what challenges and opportunities do you foresee for the life sciences industry in the future? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

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Commercial build, Swiss medical device company

Commercial build, Swiss medical device company Case study EU commercial build Our partner, a mid-sized private Swiss medical device company, engaged with us to provide the best talent for a commercial build to support the launch of their products into the orthopaedic market. The challenge Our partner already had a commercial team in Germany and wanted to expand into the whole DACH region. However, they were not very familiar within this particularly niche area. The solution We proposed an exclusive solution to work with them and advise them on the recruitment process and on how to attract the best talent within the market and small candidate pool. We assigned a German native speaker to manage the project and also had additional support from our office in Basel. We were able to use our exsisting network to indentify potential candidates. In addition, we are able to continuously build on our network through our yearly attendance to conferences. For each role, we presented our partner with 3 potential candidates. The outcome We successfully made 4 placements for our partner, leading to 4 new additional hires for key account managers as a result Throughout this project, we managed all expectations and upheld our partner’s reputation within the market As the company continues to grow, we are their chosen partner and we remain their exclusive staffing solution provider  

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Year-end bonus

Should you wait for your year-end bonus before seeking a new role?

To show their gratitude, companies will often reward their employees with a generous bonus at the end of each year. After a year of working tirelessly, receiving a bonus can be both encouraging and reassuring. In Asia, the year-end bonus is highly valued, and it can even determine your approach to job hunting during the new year. For professionals across the region, the year-end bonus is their motivation to work conscientiously and this mean they will often delay any plans to seek new job opportunities until they receive their bonus. However, is it right to hold off on furthering your career in the long-term just to receive a short-term financial reward? Here, we look at how bonus culture varies across countries in the Asia Pacific region, and why life science professionals should always be open to new opportunities.How much is the average year-end bonus?Asia is the world’s fastest growing market for pharmaceutical products and medical devices. This surge in the life sciences is continuing to create an abundance of job opportunities, making it easy for professionals to change positions if they want to further their career. With competition from other companies a threat, many companies in APAC markets offer an attractive bonus package to attract and retain talent.In China, bonuses vary from company to company and often depends on the level of seniority. Year-end bonuses often range from around 8% (one month’s salary) to 35% (around four months’ salary) of an employee’s salary.In Japan, transparent rewards are provided by most companies. Good relationships with colleagues mean there is often no privacy when it comes to bonuses. Bonuses are usually decided by the individual's length of service and seniority. They will usually depend on the profitability of company, rather than personal performance.Across the countries like Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore and Korea, the average salary increment is around 15% to 20%. With regards to South East Asian countries, the increment tends to be much higher, ranging from 30% to 35%. Bonuses are usually one month equivalent, or two to three months for senior management roles.When are bonuses usually paid? Across Asia, bonuses are typically paid out in December and April.In China, most life science companies tend to pay out bonus after Chinese New Year which overlaps their fiscal year end. The principle is employees will need to be with the business on 31st December, which literally means there wouldn’t be any bonus entitlement, should you leave the business before the year ends.The Japanese bonus system is fairly unique and includes semi-annual bonuses in June, year-end bonus in December. In addition, many Japanese companies pay a bonus in April, not to the employees themselves, but to their wives, known as a “wife bonus”. This stems from a tradition to aid the household, rather than the individual, and recognise the contribution and support a spouse provides in a worker’s life and work. What happens if you change roles before receiving the year-end bonus?Moving into a new role can often mean missing out on a year-end bonus. However, this is not always the case, and it’s important to know what type of bonus you are entitled to before you make any decisions.In China, if you announce your leaving the company, your line manager and HR department will decide if you are entitled to a bonus or not. They will factor in a few variables – your performance, your relationship with your manager, company policies and HR’s advice. To stand a good chance of being entitled to a bonus, it’s important you communicate your intentions to leave clearly and are considerate for how it might impact your team and the wider company. If you choose to take a new job opportunity in Japan before collecting your bonus, your new company may be able to compensate you by offering a sign-on bonus to offset what you would be walking away from, and this can be negotiable. In other instances, companies may consider buying out the candidate’s notice period. However, there will be a commitment clause (for example, six months or one year) that the individual would have to fulfil within the new company, otherwise they would have to pay back the buy-out amount. Should I hold off looking for a new role until I receive my bonus?Receiving a bonus for your efforts can make you feel appreciated and valued within your company. Sometimes being gifted with a generous bonus can temporarily make you forget the reasons you are thinking of leaving in the first place. However, once the novelty of a bonus has worn off, the feelings and reasons you had for wanting to leave are likely to reemerge to the surface. Putting off looking for a new role, can hold up your career progression and may mean you miss out on unique opportunities. It’s important to always be open to job opportunities that may arise. Whilst they may not be as financially rewarding in the short-term, they may be more beneficial to your career and wealth in the long run. If you had to choose between a rewarding bonus or an exciting new opportunity, which would you pick? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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Proclinical host LEAP TA Life Sciences panel discussion about the transforming talent acquisition paradigm

(VIDEO) The transforming talent acquisition paradigm

At the recent LEAP Life Sciences online event, Senior Vice President of Global Client Services at Proclinical, James MacKinnon, hosted a panel discussion with HR and TA leaders from across the life science industry which looked at transforming the talent acquisition paradigm. With countries across the world locking down due to the Covid-19 pandemic, 2020 has been a challenging year for recruitment. The panel discuss how the life science industry has adapted and look at the key learnings from this eventful year. Panel guests included: Carolyn Pastore, talent acquisition & HRBP director at Blueprint Medicines, Danny Rose, head of US HR strategy & talent management at BioNTech, Liz Arpino, associate director of talent acquisition at Agios and Khan Ozol, former head of talent acquisition at AstraZeneca.

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Public biotech, rare disease EU growth plan thumbnail

Public biotech, rare disease EU growth plan

Public biotech, rare disease EU growth plan Case study The overview A rare disease biopharmaceutical company in the US partnered with us to build their clinical operations team in Europe, starting with the head of clinical operations. The challenge Our partner had been trying to directly source candidates for a head of clinical operations role without success for 3 months, and after establishing a relationship with our team, we were approached to support them with their search. They needed someone who had experience working in disease areas that posed similar operational challenges to its own, and the exact experience required was extremely niche because it needed to include line management and strategic capabilities. This meant that the candidate pool was very narrow from which to highlight and engage suitable candidates. Cultural values were also of great importance to our partner, as this role would then go on to build a team, and so the candidate had to align with our partner’s unique ethos. The solution We implemented a clear structure and timeframe for the recruitment process, and committed to identifying a small selection of highly qualified candidates. We also asked our partner to commit to set deadlines, to ensure expectations were aligned on both sides and allowed the process to run seamlessly. Our specialist team ran a pan-European search, and conducted extensive talent mapping to identify candidates that were technically suitable, using both our existing network and headhunting tools such as LinkedIn Recruiter. We submitted a shortlist of 6 candidates to our partner, all of whom were interviewed. The outcome Following collaboration with us, a successful hire was made, with the candidate choosing the opportunity over another as the efficiency and structure of the process made a lasting impression on the candidate. The project was delivered within 6 weeks and within budget. We have successfully placed candidates across multiple divisions, and are now exclusively continuing to build our partner’s clinical operations team across Europe.   Testimonial “I have known and collaborated with Proclinical Staffing for over 5 years. I find them to be knowledgeable, easy to deal with and importantly they delivered reducing my time to hire in tight timeframes. A key and exclusive project we partnered on was a Biosimilars campaign. This resulted in many placements across various disciplines in 8 countries across Europe. I continue to partner with Proclinical Staffing at my new organisation where I look forward to an ongoing successful collaboration. I see Proclinical Staffing as an extension of our Talent Acquisition team and would recommend them for senior level recruitment unreservedly.”

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Proclinical Executive

Experienced business specialist enhances Proclinical Executive team

Life sciences recruitment specialist, Proclinical, further demonstrated its commitment to expanding its executive search division by announcing the appointment of former private equity firm partner and business leader Aaron Ray. Based at the company’s San Francisco office, Ray joins as Managing Partner of Proclinical Executive with immediate effect.  With a background in healthcare recruitment, Ray brings an array of valuable business experience to their global executive search division, including extensive expertise in management, business development, talent acquisition and consulting. Proclinical’s CEO Paul Strouts commented “We feel very privileged to have Aaron as part of our team. He brings a plethora of business experience to Proclinical and invaluable expertise in executive search and consulting. I’m incredibly excited to see how he will help us to further leverage the success of our executive search brand.”  With 20 years of experience, Ray is a seasoned business professional and brings a high calibre of experience to the team. Most recently, Ray co-founded and operated leading legal hemp and cannabis equipment and manufacturing company, STM Canna. Prior to that, Ray served as an operating partner for private investment firm Greenway Capital Markets and Transition Capital Partners. Aaron Ray said “I am thrilled to be part of such an innovative and rapidly growing organization.  I will look to build on the tremendous success Proclinical has achieved and drive global advancement of the Proclinical Executive division.” Ray has been following the executive search and consulting market since 2010 when he left his senior vice president position at AMN Healthcare to pursue an MBA. Passionate about Human Capital, Ray spent over a decade building the largest healthcare recruiting and workforce solutions firm in the US and is now expected to help Proclinical strengthen its growth in the executive search market. The Proclinical Executive brand, which is focussed on fulfilling executive and senior-level search appointments for all areas of life sciences, launched in 2017. Since then, the team have helped a wide range of global companies build out their executive teams by sourcing highly-skilled professionals from all over the world, including C-suite, board-level, and senior leadership positions. The specialist search business has gone from strength to strength and further expanded its executive teams in the UK, US, and Asia Pacific, investing into bringing in extremely high calibre personnel to do so. Within the last 12 months, Proclinical Executive has launched an office in Cambridge, UK and added first-class industry experts to the team including senior level search specialists Claire Perry in the US and Iain Hopper in the UK. About Proclinical ExecutiveProclinical Executive operate globally and solely within the life sciences space. Whether you are building leadership teams to expand into new territories, or need to locate and mobilise the very best people with rare, niche skill-sets to drive your business forward, our Executive Search division specialises in securing senior appointments to help you grow.P

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What is precision medicine and is it the future of healthcare

What is precision medicine and is it the future of healthcare?

What is precision medicine and is it the future of healthcare? As science evolves, healthcare is rapidly moving towards precision medicine, which offers a greater understanding of diseases using genetic insights and other medical advances in technology. Precision medicine, also known as personalised medicine, is a novel approach for disease treatment and prevention that considers the individual variability in genetics, environment, and lifestyle for each patient. This approach allows healthcare providers to make a more accurate diagnosis and create specialist treatment plans. Historically, the practice of drug development has largely been reactive. Patients must usually wait for the onset of symptoms before they are treated or cured. As we do not yet fully understand the genetic or environmental factors that cause some major diseases and leading causes of death such as Alzheimer’s and cancer, efforts to treat these diseases are often inaccurate and unsuccessful. This movement in medicine, away from a one-size-fits-all approach, is crucial as it provides not just the opportunity to reduce the adverse side effects but also has the potential to reduce the cost of treatments by eradicating ineffective treatment plans. Drugs and treatments created by pharmaceutical companies are often used to treat broad populations and consequently, they work for some patients but not others. It is estimated that any given prescription drug that makes it to market only works for half of those who take it. By considering each patient as an individual, precision medicine has the potential to overcome the limitations of traditional medicine by shifting the emphasis from reaction towards prevention. How does precision medicine work? Compared to traditional medicine, precision therapy has a much more targeted approach to drug development. Through extensive research, scientists have learned more about the genetics behind how diseases start and how they behave. It has become clear that many diseases are linked to gene changes. Based on the availability of a reference sequence of the human genome, it is possible to understand the role of genome variation among different individuals and population. By improving our understanding of the impact of genome variation in disease, it is now possible to begin to see the impact of that variation on health on a wider scale. With this understanding, it is possible to see how certain gene changes cause disease and what makes one person's heart disease, diabetes, or cancer act differently from another's. Armed with this knowledge, it is possible to modify treatments to make them work better. What are the benefits of precision medicine? By identifying the risk of a patient developing a disease they can be provided with an effective prevention plan, reducing unnecessary suffering for patients. This is also beneficial to society as it lessens the financial burden of illness and ineffective treatments on healthcare systems. If patients do contract a disease, then precision medicine has the potential to prevent unfavourable side effects. With medical precision, it is also possible to identify the most beneficial treatment plan before trying other methods, speeding up the recovery process and potentially extending life expectancy. Precision medicine also reduces the time, cost and failure rate of pharmaceutical clinical trials. Although developing targeted treatments can be more expensive, it eliminates the complexities and costs involved in the trial and error in traditional medicine development. Is precision medicine the future of healthcare? Precision medicine offers tremendous opportunity to shape the future of healthcare. While it is currently most advanced in oncology, precision medication also has wider, exciting applications beyond oncology and late-stage disease, such as in rare and genetic diseases, it also holds some promise in treating COVID-19. However, integrating precision medicine into healthcare is a complex process. For precision to succeed, healthcare providers will need to be equipped with digital tools that will help them understand the complex data that comes from the precise technique. While artificial intelligence platforms have emerged as viable tools to enable the use of precision medicine, these technologies will also create challenges for healthcare providers. Another challenge for precision medicine is the lack of training and knowledge amongst primary care physicians. As interest in commercial genetic testing rises among consumers, primary care physicians are increasingly having to put clinical context around patients’ test results. However, most practitioners have not had in-depth training in genomics or genetics. To advance the use of precision medicine techniques, healthcare educators will need to include genomics and genetics into continuous professional development training courses or to the curriculum. The value of precision medicine may not have the potential to extend to everyone. It is considered that certain populations will not benefit from this innovative technique because some precision therapies will not work for those populations, or because they’ll be unaffordable. In order for everyone to reap the benefits of precision therapy, the industry will need to resolve existing inequalities. Overall, precision medicine has enormous and invaluable potential to improve patient outcomes and challenge the future of healthcare. However, to see the true value and capabilities of precision medicine techniques, the industry must overcome issues with infrastructure, inequalities, and knowledge gaps. Do you think precision medicine has the potential to replace traditional medicine? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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