tolaini test

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Biological Sciences, Laboratory Technician, Pharmacology, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a PV Scientist with a biotechnology company located in Cambridge, MA.

Reference:

SC.JJ.33771

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Clinical Trial Assistant (CTA), Project/Study Manager (CSM/CPM), Program Manager / Director, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

North Chicago, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a REMOTE Data Manager with a pharmaceutical company located.

Reference:

CR.BC.33622C

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Clinical Trial Assistant (CTA), Project/Study Manager (CSM/CPM), Program Manager / Director, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Dallas, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a REMOTE Data Manager with a pharmaceutical company located.

Reference:

CR.BC.33622B

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Clinical Trial Assistant (CTA), Project/Study Manager (CSM/CPM), Program Manager / Director, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Seattle, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a REMOTE Data Manager with a pharmaceutical company located.

Reference:

CR.BC.33622

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Clinical Trial Assistant (CTA), Project/Study Manager (CSM/CPM), Program Manager / Director, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Atlanta, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a REMOTE Data Manager with a pharmaceutical company located.

Reference:

CR.BC.33622A

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Clinical Trial Assistant (CTA), Project/Study Manager (CSM/CPM), Program Manager / Director, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Boston, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a REMOTE Data Manager with a pharmaceutical company located.

Reference:

CR.BC.3322

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Biotechnology, Permanent, Analytical Chemistry, United Kingdom, Not Applicable
Location:

Macclesfield, England

Description

Proclinical has partnered with a Clinical Development in search for a Contract Process Chemist

Reference:

33762

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Biotechnology, Permanent, Data Management, Switzerland, Not Applicable
Location:

Basel, Switzerland

Description

A worldwide pharmaceutical company situated in Basel and operating in over 70 markets worldwide is looking for a Consultant in Data Migration.

Reference:

33761

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Contract Research Organisation (CRO), Permanent, Project/Study Manager (CSM/CPM), United Kingdom, Not Applicable
Location:

London, England

Description

An opportunity has opened for a fully home-based UK Snr Clinical Project Manager to join an exciting and cutting-edge US Biotech who are expanding across Europe.

Reference:

33753

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Biological Sciences, Immunology, Laboratory Technician, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Histotechnician with a pharmaceutical company located in Cambridge, MA.

Reference:

SC.NR.31670

Answering competency based interview questions

How to answer competency-based interview questions

You’ve impressed the hiring manager with your CV now it’s time to face the interview. Most life sciences interviews are likely to involve competency-based questioning. Understanding the methods and reasoning behind competency-based questioning will enable you to give strong and impressive answers. By preparing and practising successfully you will be able to effectively stand out and improve your chances of securing the role.What is competency-based interviewing? With competency-based interviews the interviewer is looking for you to show have the abilities that are integral to the role by using examples from your past experiences. Most large life science companies will have a standardised interview framework that their human resources team will adhere to. Other types of interviews, such as informal conversations, are less systematic and often don't ask the same questions of each person being interviewed. However, competency-based interviews, often use a formal scoring system of positive and negative indicators and so are less subjective in the decision-making process.Common competency-based interview questions By using competency-based interview questions, employers are asking you to back up claims about your skills and experience with real examples. The questions that you will be asked will depend on the position that you are being interviewed for. If you will be required to work as part of a close team, you might be asked questions that test your teamwork and diplomacy skills, such as: • Give an example of when you have been part of a successful team. How did you contribute to its success? • When was the last time you had an argument with a colleague? For leadership roles the interviewer might explore your initiative, adaptability or decision making. You could be asked: • Tell me about a time when you have been in a difficult circumstance. How did you resolve this? • Describe a situation in which your initial approach failed and you had to change tack.The STAR technique With this type of questioning it is important that your answers are succinct and that you do not to go off on a tangent, so you will need to consider how to articulate your experience to the interviewer.STAR is one of the most effective interview techniques for competency-based questions and is a proven method for structuring your answers so that they are relevant and focussed. Make sure that you listen to the question, take a moment to consider your answer and reply in the following way: How can you prepare? Whether it’s for a entry-level role or a management position, a good understanding of the role and the skills required will enable you to anticipate the types of questions that you might be asked. Research the position and the company thoroughly so that you know what skills they will ask you to show and are able to convey them effectively in the interview. It can be very difficult to think of good examples if you are unprepared and the interviewer puts you on the spot. Prepare for your interview by thinking of situations when you have used these skills and ask a friend or your partner to conduct a mock-interview with you.To find out more about how to prepare for a life sciences interview and how to over the hiring manager, check out our guide on how to stand out at an interview. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'bfc9f2e7-7433-486b-a16a-855e4bd2c077', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Cost of developing drugs

Why does it cost so much to develop new drugs?

The pharmaceutical industry continuously strives to leverage its scientific expertise to provide treatments to improve and save the lives of patients. Developing new medicines is a long, intricate and costly process for pharmaceutical companies all over the globe. As we gain a deeper understanding of complex diseases, discovering and developing new drugs is becoming harder. In late 2019, Jennifer Taubert, executive vice-president at Janssen Pharmaceuticals told the Financial Times “The easy diseases have largely been solved. It gets harder and harder as we go after new treatments for ever more challenging diseases”. As it’s becoming progressively more difficult for pharma companies to deliver cures for their unmet needs of patients, this is pushing the cost of drug development and therefore impacting the price of medicine for consumers. Understanding of diseases is creating complexity Breakthroughs in our understanding of genomics has resulted in many new advancements in medicine. By examining illnesses molecule by molecule, medical researchers can better understand the pathways through which cells act according to the dictates of genes and environment, allowing them to see deep into the mechanisms by which diseases cause harm and finding new methods to target. This precision brings complexity and presents the industry with new challenges. This is most apparent in cancer. Cancer was previously identified by cell and tissue type, now they are becoming increasing identified by genotype that reveals which of the array of genes that can make a cell cancerous have gone wrong in this one. As cancer drugs targeted against those different mutations have multiplied, so have the options for oncologists to combine them to fit their patients’ needs. In the US there are now over 7,000 conditions recognised as rare diseases. It is estimated almost nine of ten of these conditions currently have no approved treatment. These are the diseases that personalised, precision medicine makers mostly look to treat. However, with new precision diagnosis methods there are many conditions which were once thought to be single diseases that are actually sets of similar-looking conditions, meaning they have been created through different mechanisms and therefore require different treatments. In short, this could mean the progress in research could lead to more diseases being discovered and more medicines are needed to treat very specific conditions, increasing demand.The rising cost of pharmaceutical R&D With complexity of diseases becoming more apparent, it’s becoming increasingly expensive to develop new treatments. On average top pharma companies spend around 17% of revenues on research and development, making the pharmaceutical industry one of the biggest investors in this area. Apart from the semiconductor industry, no other industry spends more on R&D. This is only set to keep increasing, with a recent report stating R&D costs are expected to grow by 3% each year, reaching over $203 billion by 2024. The high level of R&D expenditures in the pharmaceutical industry is easy to understand given the cost of developing a new drug and bringing it to market. On average it costs nearly $4 billion to develop a new medicine but this can sometimes exceed $10 billion. Pharmaceutical companies differ from companies in other industries as the medicine research and development process involves great risk. For instance, only one out of every 10,000 discovered compounds actually get marketing authorisation. Much expense is incurred in the early phases of development. Recently, early drug development costs have risen more than those for late-stage drug development, largely owing to the FDA making it harder for drugs to be approved. Meaning pharma companies make a significant investment into a drug before it can be approved by a regulatory body, and if the drug is not approved, the company loses the money. The increasing complexity of advanced medicines and investment into treatments which do not end in success makes R&D more expensive - a factor that is contributing to the rising cost of prescription drugs. Development is essential The high cost of drug development is problematic for an industry being pressured to cut costs. It makes it harder to advance new ideas and create new cures. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb  suggested “We’re on an unsustainable path, where the cost of drug development is growing enormously, as well as costs of new medicines,” he went on to say “We need to …make the entire process less costly and more efficient.  Otherwise we won’t continue to realize the practical benefits of advances in science, in the form of new and better medicines”. So although drug development is expensive, it is essential pharma companies continue to evolve medicine to help improve lives and reduce the incidence of disease and save healthcare costs in the long run.How could the drug development process be less costly and more efficient? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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Is there a cure for Alzheimer's disease?

Five million patients in the USA. Leading cause of death in the UK. The only disease in the global top 10 causes of death that cannot currently be cured or prevented. It’s no wonder that the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease remains a top priority for the pharmaceutical industry. The important question: will there ever be a cure for Alzheimer’s? What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of dementia, which is an umbrella term for conditions that cause memory loss and impaired cognitive abilities in the ageing population. Unlike age-related changes such as becoming a little forgetful, Alzheimer’s is not a normal indicator of ageing. Instead, it is when the brain is affected by a neurodegenerative disease that causes brains cells to die off, which worsens as time goes on. A sticky build-up made from amyloid plaques and tau protein that surround the nerve cells are thought to be the culprits, as they are toxic to cells and cause problems with cell signalling and inflammation. As the brain tissue gradually loses more nerve cells over time, it’s estimated that the actual mass of the brain can shrink by the weight of an orange! Beginning with mild memory loss, the disease becomes increasingly destructive as it begins to affect cognitive ability in later stages, such as the patient being unable to engage in conversation and respond to their environment. What causes Alzheimer’s? Much like other neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s is poorly understood. It has proven difficult for pharmaceutical companies to pinpoint what causes Alzheimer’s disease, and scientists have concluded that it is a mixture of genetics and environmental factors. Some research has been carried out on those with a genetic risk of the disease, something called familial Alzheimer’s. However, this makes up less than 1% of Alzheimer’s cases with the rest being referred to as ‘sporadic’, which is why continuous research is needed to understand what triggers the disease in the majority of cases. In different parts of the world, studies have linked environmental aspects such as diet and pollution as contributing factors. Some of these studies suggest that the disease can be attributed to air pollutants, such as industrial waste and fossil fuels, causing inflammation in the brain that can accelerate cognitive ageing. Diet has been a suspected cause for many years, and in early 2017, researchers made a link between drinking diet soda drinks and increased risk of developing dementia, as well as tripling the likelihood of a stroke. Some research suggests that adopting particular diets can significantly reduce the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. For instance, a Mediterranean diet has been recommended, swapping processed food that is high in sodium and sugar with fruit and vegetables, legumes, nuts and fish. What progress has been made in finding better treatments for Alzheimer’s? The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two types of medications — cholinesterase inhibitors (Pfizer’s Aricept®, Novartis’ Exelon® , Janssen’s Razadyne®) and memantine (Allergan’s Namenda®) — to treat the cognitive symptoms (memory loss, confusion, and problems with thinking and reasoning) of Alzheimer's disease. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine both have different methods of treating the disease but so far have only been effective in mildly slowing down its progression. As Alzheimer’s is a mysterious and complex disease, there have been many clinical trial failures so far including Eli Lilly’s injectable therapy Solanezumab, which disappointed during a late-stage trial in 2016. However, Biogen and Eisai recently revived the abandoned trial of Aducanumab, which had its licence accepted by the FDA for priority review in August 2020.  If approved, Aducanumab would become the first therapy to reduce the clinical decline of Alzheimer’s disease and would also be the first therapy to demonstrate that removing amyloid beta resulted in better clinical outcomes. Furthermore, Biogen Alzheimer’s pipeline looks promising as it also boasts six other Alzheimer’s therapies in phase III clinical trials. Several other big players in the pharmaceutical industry, such as Eli Lilly and Merck, are also urgently investigating ways to prevent and cure the disease. These therapies have shown signs of improved cognitive function by either blocking or removing amyloid proteins, targeting them once they have settled in the patient’s brain. The idea of removing the amyloid plaque has also been taken up by German companies MorphoSys AG and Roche, who have partnered up to investigate a specific human antibody that has the ability to dissolve the plaque in preclinical tests. Roche’s Gantenerumab is currently in phase III. As well as developing drugs to treat Alzheimer’s, much research is going into understanding how the disease works and what the underlying causes may be. For example, Takeda Pharmaceuticals and Zinfandel Pharmaceuticals are working together to validate a biomarker called TOMM40 to use as a test for Alzheimer’s. Other researchers at the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease in San Francisco have discovered that a depleted level of neurotransmitters called EphB2 in the brain could be a key contributor to memory loss in Alzheimer’s patients. With these positive advances in scientific research, there may be a cure for Alzheimer’s disease in sight in the near future. If you would like to be involved in developing treatments and cures for life-threatening diseases, consider a job in clinical research where you will have the opportunity to use your skills to combat unmet medical need in the world. At Proclinical, we work with many of the leading global pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies, and have the tools to help you to fulfil your potential in the right clinical research job.

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medical affairs career paths

How to progress a career in medical affairs

Medical affairs acts as the bridge between the industry and the wider medical community. It is a crucial part of any pharmaceutical or medical devices company and there are a variety of roles and ways to progress your career. Here we take a look at some of typical career paths that are available to professionals looking to pursue a career in medical affairs: Medical science liaison (MSL) or medical communications Getting an MSL job or medical communications role is a common starting point for those wanting to break into the medical affairs field. Although some pharmaceutical companies may prefer to hire professionals with specific MSL experience, often they will recruit from outside the pharmaceutical industry, for instance, those with a relevant educational background (MD or PhD). Similarly, medical communications roles, such as scientific advisors and medical information officer, can also set you up for a successful medical affairs career. MSLs are a field-based and spend a vast amount of time travelling within their assigned region. It is their responsibility to meet with key opinion leaders (KOLs) such as physicians and educate on their field of expertise and explain the scientific background behind drugs and treatments. So, what skills do employers look for in an MSL? To be a successful MSL, you must be a subject matter expert in your therapy area, educated to a high degree and be highly articulate with excellent presentation skills. In terms of career progression, you can become a senior MSL which could involve higher profile projects and a pay rise. Medical communications roles, particularly as a scientific advisor, will have many of the same requirements. Scientific advisors require expert knowledge and strong communication skills to build relationships with key personnel within the medical community. Medical information jobs are similar in the way that they provide expert technical and scientific information within their therapy area, often providing internal support to medical, sales and marketing teams within the company. Yet there are other elements to the role that differ. For example, medical information roles involve researching and answering queries from customers and recording information about adverse events. The experience gained in a medical information job can help you to access other medical affairs jobs in pharma including MSL roles, medical communications management and compliance. Medical advisor Many MSLs or senior medical communication roles often move into a medical advisor role as a next step in their career. It is also a possible starting point for physicians wanting to move into medical affairs. There is a considerable amount of overlap between the job description of a medical advisor role and that of an MSL or scientific advisor, yet there are some marked differences. The main difference is that, unlike MSLs, medical advisors are not field based. Medical advisor jobs are office-based and more administrative, dealing with medical and marketing strategy rather than involved with delivering presentations to KOLs, even though their scientific expertise may be called upon from time to time. Requirements for medical advisor jobs are either a very advanced degree (PharmD or PhD) or, for a more direct route in, a medical doctor (MD) qualification. Other requirements are very similar to those needed to become an MSL or medical communication professional as it is a natural step in this career path. However, being a strategic thinker will help you to excel in this position, as you will be required to assist sales and marketing teams with medical strategy planning. MSL manager or medical manager/director A definitive step up in your medical affairs career would be to seek an MSL manager role and then, to get to the top of the medical affairs career ladder, a medical manager or director job. MSL manager jobs involve managing a team of MSLs, ensuring that they are up-to-date in their assigned therapeutic area and are aligned to the company’s brand and medical strategy. This could involve accompanying MSLs on their visits with KOLs, ensuring that their training and scientific knowledge is of a high standard. MSL managers may also be expected to make presentations to physicians about the company’s products and treatments. Much like MSLs themselves, MSL managers will need to attend relevant scientific meetings and conferences to ensure that they are informed on all the latest medical information, and can better assist with their own company’s medical strategy. Medical manager or medical director jobs are the most senior positions within medical affairs. These professionals are responsible for overseeing all medical affairs activity within the company, usually for an entire region such as UK & Ireland or Europe. Principally, you will manage MSL strategy, attend global meetings with other medical directors, help to develop the pipeline in your therapy area and provide scientific/technical expertise on brand and medical strategy. You will be responsible for replying to enquiries from physicians and other medical professionals about your company’s products or specifically about your therapy area. To become an MSL manager, you must have a deep understanding of the role and needs of an MSL and have proven leadership skills in order to successfully manage an MSL team. At this stage, you will have built up a first-rate network of heath care professionals within your therapy area and also the wider medical community. In most cases, a medical manager or director will be a physician, affording them the authority to act as final signatory. As well as this advanced qualification, medical affairs professionals at this level will have extremely advanced and developed scientific knowledge and experience, as well as the ability to network at a high standard with KOLs and other medical managers and directors within the pharmaceutical industry. At Proclinical Staffing, we have an immediate and ongoing requirement for experts to fill a wide range of medical affairs vacancies at pharmaceutical, biotech and medical device organisations. Our specialist recruitment consultants will be able to help you take the next step in your career when you send your CV to us. Alternatively, use our search tool to find the right role for you.  

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Top 10 medical devices companies - 2020

Who are the top 10 medical device companies in the world? (2020)

The medical devices industry is fast-growing market driven by the complex needs of patients encouraging companies to develop innovative therapies to improve health and quality of life. In 2019, the global medical devices market reached a value of nearly $456.9bn. Growth has resulted from a rise in the number of healthcare facilities, healthcare expenditure, technological advancements and an aging population. We have ranked the leading medical device companies by 2019 revenue, looking at their medical devices segment results only. The list shows the top 10 biggest medical device companies in the world in 2020: 10. Cardinal Health American multinational healthcare services company, Cardinal Health is in tenth place. With over 100 years of experience and 50,000 employees, the company is widely recognised for providing pharmaceuticals, medical products and services that help healthcare providers. In the 2020 fiscal year, the company’s medical segment revenue fell slightly, with year-on-year growth down 1% owing to the adverse effects of cancelled or deferred elective procedures related to Covid-19, primarily on products and distribution.  9. Beckton Dickinson & Company Commonly referred to as BD, Beckton Dickinson & Company is an American multinational medical technology company that manufactures and sells medical devices, instrument systems, and reagents. BD’s medical division grew by 8% in 2019. Growth was broad-based across divisions and regions. Investments in research and development led to the successful launch of 25 major products in 2019. Looking ahead the company plans to continue to invest and develop a robust pipeline of new products. 8. Siemens Healthineers Siemens Healthineers sits in eighth place on the list of top medical device companies. Headquartered in Germany, Siemens Healthineers is the medical technology branch of automation and electrics conglomerate Siemens. In 2019, the company’s sales increased by an impressive 14% supported by all segments with very strong growth for Imaging and Advanced Therapies. Fiscal year 2020 marks the beginning of the second phase of the Siemens Healthineers Strategy 2025, with growth plans for all three core segments: Imaging, Diagnostics and Advanced Therapies. It’s cross-segment priorities are to increase market share across geographic growth markets, increase market share gains with leading healthcare providers and to drive forward the company’s digital transformation. 7. Fresenius Medical Care German-based international healthcare company, Fresenius, takes seventh place. With over 300,000 employees in more than 100 countries, Fresenius is a leading provider of products and services for dialysis, hospitals and outpatient treatment. In 2019, the company’s medical care division grew by a steady 1%. The acquisition and integration of home dialysis treatment, NxStage, greatly boosted the company’s performance. In the company’s annual general meeting it was stated Fresenius’ stable business model has helped keep the company on track for growth, even in face of the significant challenges presented by the Covid-19 pandemic. 6. Philips With over a hundred years in business, Philips is a diversified technology company. Philips’ health care division makes up 42% of their global revenue and is made up of three key areas; Diagnosis & Treatment, Connected Care and Personal Health. In 2019, Philips’ health business generated $19bn in sales, this was down by 8% on a year on year basis driven by steady growth from all divisions. Moving forward, Philips has a strategic plan to further boost growth, by focusing on capturing geographic growth opportunities, driving innovation solutions and reinforcing M&A, organic investments and partnerships. 5. GE Healthcare A staple to the top 10 is leading global medical technology and life sciences company, GE Healthcare. With a broad portfolio of products, GE Healthcare is widely recognised for its imaging, ultrasound, software and life care solutions. The company’s Healthcare sales grew by 1% in 2019, driven by strong performances by Life Care Solutions, Services, and Ultrasound, partially offset by Imaging. In late 2019 GE Healthcare unveiled a string of deals to expand its presence in the growing fields of 3D printing, surgical robotics and virtual care. In a press release president and CEO of GE Healthcare, Kieran Murphy commented “Healthcare’s next chapter will be written in part by emerging technologies like 3D printing, robotic surgery and virtual patient monitoring”. 4. Abbott American multinational, Abbot takes fourth spot in 2020s biggest medical device companies. Founded over 130 years ago, Abbott is headquartered in Illinois and delivers medical devices and healthcare solutions to more than 160 countries. With 107,000 employees worldwide, the company is well known for creating breakthrough products in diagnostics, medical devices, nutrition and branded generic pharmaceuticals. In 2019, Abbott’s sales increased by a notable 5%, with a stellar performance from glucose-monitoring system, FreeStyle Libre and heart valve treatment MitraClip. Looking ahead the company plans to continue to deliver sustainable growth, sustainable success, and a sustainable future. 3. Thermo Fisher Scientific Based in Massachusetts, medical diagnostics company Thermo Fisher Scientific is made up of four key segments; Life Science Solutions, Analytical Instruments, Specialty Diagnostics and Laboratory Products and Services. The company’s revenue rose by a healthy 5% in 2019, securing the company’s position in the top 3 of this list. Growth was driven by high-impact innovation and new product launches. The company remains committed to continuous innovation and plans to leverage its scope to more emerging markets. 2. Johnson & Johnson Johnson & Johnson takes the second spot in 2020. Johnson & Johnson’s Medical Devices segment includes a wide range of products used in the Orthopaedic, Surgery, Interventional Solutions and Eye Health fields. In 2019, the division generated sales of $26bn, a decrease of 4% compared to 2018. A fall in sales for the division was as a result of a decline in revenue for Surgery and Orthopaedics. A further decrease in growth was offset by a stellar performance for Electrophysiology, Contact Lens and Energy and Endocutters. Looking ahead, the company plans to prioritise improving their pipeline of innovation and managing their portfolio by focusing on the smooth execution of acquisitions and strategic partnerships. 1. Medtronic Medtronic remains the largest medical device company in the world. With a workforce of over 90,000, operating in 150 countries, Medtronic is at the forefront of medical technology. In fiscal year 2020, the company generated an impressive $28.9bn in revenue, a decrease of 3% year-on-year. A decrease in revenue was caused by the Covid-19 pandemic which effected the company’s Q4 2020 results. The effect of Covid-19 is expected to continue to have an adverse impact on significant aspects of the business. However, the company remain committed to remain committed to optimising innovation, improving R&D productivity, driving growth in emerging markets, clinical evidence generation, and assessing our R&D programs. Comment below to let us know your thoughts on the top 10 medical device companies in 2020 and how you see them performing over the next year.

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Questions to ask before, during and after your job interview

2 Interviewing for a new job can be an overwhelmingly stressful experience. If the interview goes well, you could be changing the trajectory of your life science career. However, if it doesn’t you will be left back at square one. Knowing what to ask can be the key to a successful interviewing process. Asking the right questions can impress the interviewer and also help you to evaluate the role effectively to see if it is a good fit for you. Here are some key interview questions to ask before, during and after a job interview: Questions to ask before your job interview In order to be as prepared as possible, you need to find out key pieces of information about the interview. There is nothing worse than going into an interview unprepared, with little knowledge of the company or the interview process. Asking the below questions of your recruiter or the human resources representative will assist you in preparing yourself properly for the interview. What to ask: Who will I be meeting with? Knowing who you will be meeting will help you in many ways. Once you know who you are meeting with, you can do your research. Take a look at their LinkedIn profile and check for any similarities with yourself. Perhaps you attended the same university or have a similar background; this can help to build rapport when you first meet. Doing your research on your interviewers can also help you to form your questions. For example: “I see you have been with Company X for 10 years, why do you like working here?” or “I saw on your LinkedIn profile you graduated with a degree in civil engineering, how did you get into the pharmaceutical industry?". What is the typical interview process like? Asking this question provides you with information about what to expect during the interview process. Perhaps you have to take a personality test or prepare a project. Asking about the process can help you to plan accordingly and negotiate with your current position for time off. It also helps to manage your expectations and can help you to prepare further.What does the ideal candidate look like for this role? Learning about the ideal candidate will allow you to know whether you are in fact a good fit for this position. If they are looking for someone with completely opposite characteristics or knowledge in other areas, you should consider if it is worth progressing with the process However, the answer to this question could also help you to shape your answers and approach to the face-to-face or video interview. Questions to ask during your job interview Asking the right questions during the interview is essential. If you are asked “do you have any questions?” whether you are on a pharmaceutical job interview, clinical research job interview, or medical science liaison job interview, the answer is always the same. YES! Before asking questions, try to gage what kind of person the interviewer is: Can you have relaxed conversation? Or do they just want to talk business? This will help you when it comes to knowing how behave and what kind of questions will be appropriate to ask.  The questions asked during the interview are most important. Try and write down a few before your interview so you are not racking your brain trying to remember them. Make sure to cater your questions to your industry. If you are interviewing for a pharmaceutical job, you will want to adjust your questions accordingly.What to ask: What are the opportunities for career growth in this role? / What is the expected career path for someone in this role?Asking about the career path and growth in a role shows initiative. It also shows you are ambitious and thinking about the future. Additionally, this question gives you insight into your potential future with the company. What are your expectations of someone in this role in the first three months? This question shows that you want to perform well if you are given this position. It will also give you an example of how the company evaluates employees. Perhaps their expectations are too high for you; if so it is better to know now than after accepting the position. What are the training opportunities offered for this position?  This is important information to know. First, because it allows you to know how the company takes care of employees. Next, it exhibits how real the growth opportunities at a company are. Companies who grow employees from within through training usually have more concrete career paths. What will be my biggest challenge or objective in the first six months? There are two objectives in asking this question: Firstly, it will help you grasp what difficulties you are likely to run into, and secondly; it gives you the opportunity to really sell yourself on those points as someone who is willing and capable of taking on the challenge. What does success look like in this position, and how do you measure it?  It’s crucial to have a deep understanding of how a company measures success. What are the key performance indicators (KPIs) for the role? How often are they measured? This shows understanding of the role and will also give you more of an indication as to if this is something you could manage. Questions to ask after your job interview After the questions have been exchanged, now is your chance to really shine. When the interview is wrapping up, you can ask questions that will give you a better idea of your candidacy. What to ask: Do you have any hesitations or doubts with me as a candidate? / Do you have any doubts in my ability to do this job well? Depending on the person interviewing, you will get either a very honest answer or a very ambiguous answer. If there are doubts, this is your opportunity to combat them and attempt to change the interviewer's mind. What is the next step in the interview process? Unless you have already been told, this question shows you are interested in moving forward with the position. Everyone likes to feel wanted and your future employer is no different. The answer may also give you some insight into the interviewer’s feelings towards you as a candidate. A job interview can lead to an exciting opportunity for you to progress in your life sciences career. In order to achieve success, preparation is key. Your questions should be thoughtful and worded in a way that is comfortable and natural for you. Take your time, be concise and relax. Do you agree with our list? What other good questions do you think you should ask when you have an interview? Let us know in the comments below.

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Why are pharmaceutical companies so important?

Pharmaceuticals have been used to treat illnesses for thousands of years. The early days of medication included plants and herbal remedies to treat a variety of diseases and traumas. Today, the long and complex journey to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of a compound and bring it from the laboratory into the hands of patients in need, is a multi-billion-dollar global industry.  Pharmaceutical companies continually strive towards innovative new treatments that help people live longer and healthier lives. These therapies are developed, manufactured, marketed and distributed around the world by pharmaceutical companies every day. Here, we look at some of the key contributions of the industry, and the reasons why pharmaceutical companies are so important to patients and society:  1. Treatments increase life expectancy The pharmaceutical industry has greatly contributed to the increase in life expectancy for men and women across the world. It has been reported that pharmaceutical advancements accounted for 73% of the total increase in life expectancy between 2000 and 2009, across 30 developing and high-income countries. In 1900, global life expectancy was just 32 years; thanks to advancements in medicines, this has more than doubled and today the average life expectancy stands at 72 years. Japan and Hong Kong have the highest average life expectancy, with people living to 85 years old on average. Pharmaceutical innovation has not just benefited richer nations, developing countries have also been positively impacted and global inequality in life expectancy is starting to decrease.  2. The industry strives to eradicate and eliminate diseases Disease eradication is the ultimate goal when developing treatments, as this benefits ecosystems on a global level. To date, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared smallpox as the first – and so far only – human disease to be eradicated globally. There are 7 diseases that are almost eradicated, including: measles, rubella, polio, guinea worm and lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis). Eradication is extremely hard to achieve as it requires a vaccination and a true global effort. 3. Reduced pain and suffering Although many pharmaceuticals do directly cure conditions, they can also be used to manage pain, symptoms or side-effects of other treatments, helping to relieve discomfort. A study by the WHO showed that individuals who live with persistent pain are four times more likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and twice as more likely to have difficulty working than those who do not suffer with pain. By providing treatments to manage pain, symptoms and side-effects, pharmaceutical companies can improve patients’ quality of life, allowing them the freedom to live healthier and more fulfilled lives. 4. Vaccines save money By preventing disease, vaccines not only help to save millions of lives, they save money too. Vaccines are widely accepted as a cost-effective public health intervention, reducing healthcare spending and prevent productivity loss, curbing the wider impact on the economy. According to the WHO for every $1 the US spends on childhood vaccinations, over $10 in disease treatment costs is saved. 5. Hospital stays are shorter In the US, 50 years ago, the average hospital stay was 8 days. With innovation and greater access to medicine, patients have the potential to recover more quickly. Many conditions that would have previously required invasive treatments and operations can now be treated with medicines. Today, the average hospital stay in the US stands at just 4-5 days. With patients being able to be discharged quicker, this has reduced pressure on the healthcare system and healthcare workers. 6. The industry employees millions of people Pharmaceutical companies are responsible for millions of jobs across the world. In the US, the biopharmaceutical industry employs over 800,000 professionals who work across a wide range of areas including scientific research, technical support and manufacturing. It is estimated that in the US, the industry directly and indirectly supports around 4.7 million jobs. Pharmaceutical companies require highly skilled and educated professionals, with roles for administrative level up to and including Ph.D. scientists. 7. Pharmaceutical companies boost the global economy As well as driving medical progress by researching, developing and bringing new medicines that improve health and quality of life for patients around the world, the pharmaceutical industry is a key asset to the global economy. The industry reached unprecedented heights in 2019, worth an estimated $1.3 trillion. The industry’s research and development (R&D) enterprise drives sizable economic impacts. In the US, biopharmaceutical manufacturers spend more in R&D relative to sales than any other manufacturing industry, investing more than six times the average for all manufacturing industries. Overall, pharmaceutical companies play a pivotal role in helping patients and communities. They provide more than potential cures and lifesaving treatments; they also create fulfilling jobs and fuel the global economy. Looking ahead, the industry will continue to firmly establish its importance in the world by creating more exciting and ground-breaking treatments.  Why are pharmaceutical companies so important to you? Let us know in the comments below.

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Proclinical Executive helps AusCann to appoint new CEO

Australian-based pharmaceutical company AusCann have confirmed Nick Woolf as their new Chief Executive Officer (CEO), with immediate effect after an international search. Woolf takes the reigns at the Perth-based medicinal cannabis firm from Ido Kanyon, who announced his resignation in May, and the handover is expected to complete late August 2020. The new leadership appointment for AusCann, which focuses on the development, production, and distribution of cannabinoid-based medicines within Australia and internationally, is the result of a successful partnership with global life sciences search firm, Proclinical Executive. Woolf joins AusCann with over 25 years of experience in life sciences and investment banking industries both in Australia and overseas, having previously worked as a CEO of Proteolytics, Chief Business Officer of Suda Pharmaceuticals (ASX:SUD) and Chief Financial Officer of PYC Therapeutics (ASX:PYC). In a company statement, Woolf said, “I am excited joining AusCann at this pivotal point in its development and building on the work already undertaken by Ido Kanyon in getting our first product into market and commencing our clinical research programmes”.  AusCann’s Chairman, Max Johnston expressed, “We are very fortunate to have been able to secure Nick for the role. He brings with him a proven record of driving commercial success and has extensive cross functional expertise in finance, operations and business development within life sciences as well as investment markets and M&A”. Woolf’s appointment is one of several made in the emerging market of medicinal cannabis by Proclinical Executive, who specialise in recruiting for senior roles across the biopharmaceutical and medical technology sector. About AusCannAusCann Group Holdings Limited (ASX:AC8) is an Australian-based pharmaceutical company focused on the development, production, and distribution of cannabinoid-based medicines within Australia and internationally. AusCann focuses on transforming the way medical cannabis is supplied by making standardised dose-controlled cannabinoid-based pharmaceutical products and clinical evidence accessible to patients, physicians and healthcare providers. AusCann provides healthcare providers with the opportunity to treat their patients with a reliable and stable cannabinoid-based pharmaceutical product, monitor treatment results and adjust treatment algorithms using a portfolio of products and formulations.About Proclinical Executive Proclinical Executive operate globally and solely within the life sciences space. Whether you are building leadership teams to expand into new territories, or need to locate and mobilise the very best people with rare, niche skill-sets to drive your business forward, our Executive Search division specialises in securing senior appointments to help you grow.

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Top 10 pharmaceutical companies - 2020

Who are the top 10 pharmaceutical companies in the world? (2020)

With demand for treatments ever increasing, pharmaceutical companies around the world are committed to drive critical innovation to deliver therapies for patients with unmet medical needs. In 2019, the global pharmaceutical industry continued to grow at a rapid pace, making an estimated $1.3 trillion. As expected, this was largely driven by new product launches such as AbbVie’s Skyrizi and Novartis’ Zolgensma. Slightly down from 2018, the US FDA approved 48 new drugs and biologics in 2019, which still comes in as the third biggest approval class in the past 25 years. The FDA approved an impressive number of generics with a huge 1,171 approvals, breaking its previous record of 971 in 2018. With the tough losses of patents for pharma companies, new product launches are becoming increasingly important. The Covid-19 pandemic, which was first discovered at the end of 2019, has had an unprecedented impact on the world. Looking forward, communities across the globe are relying on the pharmaceutical industry to create solutions, and many of the companies in the top 10 are involved in the race to produce treatment or prevention measures for the Covid-19 disease. In 2020, we expect the effect of the Covid-19 pandemic to become clearer, although since access to healthcare providers has been restricted, the majority of pharma companies in the top 10 have been negatively impacted.  We have ranked the leading pharmaceutical companies by 2019 revenue, looking at their pharmaceutical segment results only. The list below shows the top 10 biggest pharma companies in the world in 2020:  Ranking in at number 10 is American multinational, Amgen. With its “biology-first approach”, Amgen produces innovative medicines and delivers them to 100 countries and regions worldwide. In 2019, Amgen’s revenue fell by 1%, largely caused by a decrease in revenue for Neulasta and Sinsipar/Mimpara which were both impacted by pressure from increased competition. In the earnings call, Amgen’s Chairman and CEO, Robert A. Bradway, confirmed the company is entering a new phase of new product revenue growth.   A staple to the top 10 pharmaceutical companies is French multinational pharmaceutical giant, Sanofi. Sanofi provides healthcare solutions to 170 countries worldwide and has three core focuses: speciality care, vaccines and general medicines. In 2019, Sanofi’s pharmaceutical segment grew by 4% on a year-on-year basis, with a stellar performance from recently launched Eczema treatment Dupixent, which is set for further growth as Sanofi plans to extend its reach to another 89 countries. Looking to the future, Sanofi’s R&D pipeline is in a strong position to produce long-term growth. At the end of July 2020, the R&D programme had 83 projects, including 33 new molecular entities in clinical development (or that have been submitted to the regulatory authorities).  Founded 133 years ago, Bristol-Myers Squibb is a leading global pharmaceutical company that specialises in medicinal advancements in four key areas: oncology, haematology, immunology and cardiovascular disease. The company continued to produce strong growth in 2019, with revenues increasing by 15% year-on-year. In 2019, Bristol-Myers Squibb closed on the acquisition of Celgene, to create a leading biopharmaceutical company. With an extended portfolio of accomplished brands and new product launches, long-term the company is well positioned to achieve steady and sustainable growth.  Headquartered in Osaka, Japanese multinational Takeda is the largest pharmaceutical company in Asia. Following its merger with Shire in early 2019, Takeda has secured its spot in the top 10. The company focuses its efforts in four core areas: oncology, rare diseases, neuroscience, and gastroenterology. Takeda’s geographic footprint is now strongly aligned with global biopharmaceutical industry growth opportunities, with strong presence in the US, Europe and Canada. As an R&D driven company, Takeda is demonstrating its innovation and values in its response to Covid-19 and in positioning itself for stable growth.  AbbVie was created in 2013, when the company separated from Abbott. Employing 47,000 experts, AbbVie tends to drive its R&D efforts towards difficult-to-cure diseases and successfully acquired Allergan in May 2019, strengthening the company’s position in a number of therapeutic areas including immunology, oncology and neuroscience. In 2019, the company’s revenues increased by 2%, with significant clinical and philanthropic achievements.  In the fifth spot is Swiss multinational pharmaceutical company, Novartis. Novartis has developed, manufactured and marketed breakthrough medicines for over 250 years. Now with presence in 155 countries across the world, Novartis focuses on innovative medicines as well as generics and biosimilars. In 2019, Innovative Medicines net sales rose by an impressive 8%, driven by pharma key brands Cosentyx, Entresto and Zolgensma. The Oncology division also generated notable growth, with revenues rising by 10%. In 2019, Novartis successfully divested its eye care division, Alcon, with the vision to create a more focused medicines company. Looking ahead, Novartis is set to suffer the greatest number of expiries in 2020 with eight drugs losing their market exclusivity. The company continues to strive for success across all divisions by continually streamlining its services and production platforms.  American pharmaceutical company Merck takes fourth spot as one of the top pharmaceutical companies in the world in 2019. Founded in 1891, Merck is headquartered in New Jersey and focuses on pharmaceuticals, vaccines and animal health. With 71,000 employees worldwide, the company is well known for its contributions to diabetes and cancer care. Full-year 2019 pharmaceutical sales increased by 11% to $41.8 billion. Key growth drivers included Keytruda, Gardasi and Varivax. Looking ahead, Merck continues to streamline its business model in order to invest in breakthrough innovation. Johnson & Johnson remains in this year's list of the biggest pharmaceutical companies. With headquarters based in New Jersey, Johnson & Johnson develops and produces pharmaceuticals, medical devices and consumer health goods. With a strong performance by key brands Strelara, Darzalex and Imbruvica, Johnson & Johnson’s pharmaceutical division grew by an impressive 4% in 2019. Looking ahead, Johnson & Johnson has a broad portfolio that is well positioned to deliver strong results and long-term growth.  Former number one, leading pharma giant Pfizer takes second place in 2020. Pfizer specialises in the development of medicines and vaccines across a wide range of disciplines including immunology, oncology, cardiology and neurology. The company employees over 88,000 people and delivers its healthcare solutions to over 150 countries across the world. In recent years, Pfizer has dealt with some costly patent expirations including Viagra and Lyrica, and the company expects to be hit by more of these losses this year. In 2019, revenues for the company fell by 1%. A weak performance for consumer health and Upjohn (Pfizer’s off-patent medicine division) was offset by biopharma. Key performers in medicine included Irbrance, Eliquis, Lyrica and Xeljanz. In 2019, Pfizer took bold steps to position the company for sustained growth with the plan to combine Upjohn and Mylan’s strengths, resources and access. This was expected to close in 2020 but this has since been delayed due to the impact of Covid-19. Roche has taken the top spot in 2020, surpassing Pfizer as the biggest pharmaceutical company in the world. With a workforce of over 90,000 and headquarters based in Basel Switzerland, Roche is at the forefront of oncology, immunology, infectious diseases, ophthalmology and neuroscience. In 2019, sales of Roche’s pharma segment rose by a healthy 16% to $53bn. Growth for the pharma business was driven by the strong uptake of new medicines and product launches which more than compensated for biosimilar competition. Roche’s best-selling drugs included multiple sclerosis medicine Ocrevus, haemophilia medicine Hemlibra and cancer medicines Tecentriq and Perjeta. Looking to the future, Roche is developing its capabilities and building partnerships ready to deliver on the next stage in personalised healthcare and will continue to focus on prescription medicines.  Let us know your thoughts on how the top 10 pharma companies in 2020 performed and how you see this list changing over the year ahead.

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US based biotech, regulatory affairs leader hire 

US based biotech, regulatory affairs leader hire Case study We partnered with US based biotech who needed our help to find a new senior member for their regulatory affairs leadership team. Our partner, a growing biotechnology company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, specializes in developing exosomes, natural vesicles that mediate inter-cellular communication, as both a powerful therapeutic modality and an advanced diagnostic system. The challenge The company was looking for a senior regulatory affairs director CMC with a highly specialised RA CMC background. This was due to the need for proven track record of successful new biological entity registrations and a strong understanding of biologics products. The major challenge as always in the Boston area, is that the marketplace is very competitive and it is hard to keep candidates engaged. The solution We put together a shortlist of 8, and after an efficient interview process, a successful candidate was identified as a very strong potential hire. Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic at the time of hire (April 2020) and prior to the final interview, there were some potential issues with remote working arrangements. We immediately stepped in to negotiate a working arrangement on both ends, culminating in an agreement for a 50-50 work arrangement post December 2020. Once the HR director gave an in-principle approval for the remote working arrangement proposal, the hire was quickly made. This was the first full-time regulatory affairs hire for the organisation following on from the VP of RA as they had a skills gap within the CMC. The company were very serious about the hire and worked efficiently to schedule interviews accordingly in order to expedite the process as quickly as possible which left a very positive impression on the candidate. The outcome The candidate we placed had three other opportunities to consider. Thankfully the candidate was highly engaged with the company and was very interested in the science, which helped seal the placement in the company’s favour. The total time to hire from taking the brief to completion was just three weeks. The successful partnership between us and the organisation with further key hires being secured in analytical science and development.  

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