tolaini test

Salary:

£0.00 - £60.00 per hour

Options Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), Switzerland
Location:

Basel

Description

A job vacancy for a GMP Support/Compliance Manager has arisen at a leading global pharmaceutical company specialising in the development of biological therapies.

Reference:

QA.KD.23477_1558455991

Salary:

£0.00 - £50000.00 per annum

Options Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Field, France
Location:

Toulouse, Midi-Pyrénées

Description

An international medical devices company that specialises in radiation oncology is currently recruiting a Field Service Engineer (FSE) to join their office in France.

Reference:

EN.VP.23469_1558452887

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Good Clinical Practice (GCP), United Kingdom
Location:

London

Description

An international pharmaceutical company that provides full-service ophthalmic clinical research is seeking to recruit a QA Consultant - GCP to their office in the UK.

Reference:

QA.JF.23467_1558451600

Salary:

£0.00 - £65000.00 per annum

Options Biotechnology, Contract, Good Clinical Practice (GCP), United Kingdom
Location:

Slough, Berkshire

Description

A leading biopharmaceutical company, which develops and commercialises medicines in Oncological, Neuroscience, and Rare Disease fields, is currently recruiting for a Technical Director.

Reference:

QA.JG.23463_1558450357

Salary:

€0.00 - €120000.00 per annum

Options Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, CMC, Germany
Location:

Munich, Bayern

Description

An international pharmaceutical company are looking expand their regulatory team by hiring a Director Regulatory Affairs - Biosimilars.

Reference:

RA.AC.23462_1558445836

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Contract Research Organisation (CRO), Permanent, Program Manager / Director, Spain
Location:

Madrid

Description

One of the largest CROS in the global market is currently recruiting an Associate Director, Project Management to their team in Spain.

Reference:

CR.TS.23439_1558434949

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Program Manager / Director, United Kingdom
Location:

London

Description

One of the largest CROS in the global market is currently recruiting an Associate Director, Project Management to their team in the UK.

Reference:

CR.TS.23438_1558434651

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Contract Research Organisation (CRO), Permanent, Clinical Research Associate (CRA), United Kingdom
Location:

London

Description

One of the largest CROs in the global market is seeking to recruit a Senior/CRA II to join their team on a home-based capacity.

Reference:

CR.TS.23435_1558373514

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Contract Research Organisation (CRO), Permanent, Clinical Research Associate (CRA), France
Location:

Paris, Île-de-France

Description

ProClinical is advertising a vacancy for a CRA II/SCRA with a leading full-service global Contract Research Organisation (CRO)

Reference:

CR.TS.23434_1558372794

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Contract Research Organisation (CRO), Permanent, Clinical Research Associate (CRA), France
Location:

Paris, Île-de-France

Description

An international contract research organization (CRO) is seeking to recruit a CRA II to its office in Paris.

Reference:

CR.TS.23433_1558372591

ProClinical Switzerland

ProClinical AG moves Swiss operations to state-of-the-art Grosspeter Tower

21st May 2019 - Basel, SwitzerlandAt the end of May 2019, ProClinical AG, the company’s Swiss operation moved to a new location in Basel. The office move is a result of the company’s rapidly expanding business in this region and increasing demand for skilled R&D professionals from leading Swiss-based pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical, medical device and clinical research organisations. The new offices in the state-of-the-art Grosspeter Tower boast a spectacular view over the city of Basel. In the distance, the ‘Dreiländereck’ can be seen, which is the tri-point where the borders of France, Germany and Switzerland meet. The new location also brings the team closer to some of their most important and valued clients, as the impressive Roche Tower and expansive Novartis campus can easily be seen from the offices. The offices are a great place for candidates, clients and employees alike to enjoy a coffee and some spectacular views of the city.  John Bowler, ProClinical AG’s General Manager, is delighted to have moved into the Grosspeter Tower, “This milestone relocation really reflects the success story of our business here in Switzerland over the past few years. The new office means we have more room to accommodate our clientele and expand our innovative service lines to continuously improve our capabilities for life science candidates and clients in these regions.” With the surge of success, ProClinical AG looks further strengthen its reputation in the market as an industry leading staffing provider. About ProClinicalProClinical is a leading global staffing services provider that specialises exclusively within the life sciences industry. Our client base includes leading global pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, medical device and health tech pioneers, and associated life science companies, including CROs and the outsourcing sector.

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Alex Czuprynski: From Intern to Team Lead

Alex Czuprynski began his career at ProClinical as an intern/placement year student while studying for his biomedical science degree. After a successful year, Alex returned to ProClinical when he completed university in 2016 - but not before a few months of travelling! Thanks to the experience he accumulated during his placement year, Alex skipped the entry associate level and returned as a fully-fledged consultant. In the three years since, he has thrived at ProClinical, having been promoted consistently from consultant through to senior consultant, principal consultant and finally his current position as team lead of Regulatory Affairs. Here’s a bit of insight into Alex’s experiences and career progression over the years at ProClinical: What was your placement year like? For the first three months it was quite an adjustment. I’d previously never worked in an office environment before, so it was tricky getting used to working in front of a computer and getting on the phones. But the training was really good. I was assigned to the Regulatory Affairs recruitment team and had a mentor to guide me through a structured learning development process. Luckily there was no huge pressure to make placements right away. ProClinical was good at giving me time to find my stride as I had a slow start. I didn’t make a placement for 4 months! With some help from my mentor and other team members I quickly found my way, making multiple placements and earning commission. What attracted you to ProClinical for your placement year? Much like other life science graduates, I was disaffected by working in a laboratory during the summer. I found it quite boring and repetitive, and it was quite poorly paid in comparison to other sectors. I had never considered recruitment as an option but after finding out more I saw that it was a happy medium for me. It was a chance to continue working in the life science industry whilst having an interesting, variable day-to-day job.  Ultimately, I applied for a placement year at ProClinical because it was something a little bit different, but I also felt like I was putting my scientific knowledge to really good use. What does recruitment offer you that a career in industry wouldn’t? Generally speaking, recruitment can be challenging, but the career development offered to me was far superior than any of my other options. It’s clear what your targets are and what is required to progress, so it’s simply about getting down to it and doing what you need to get to the next wrung on the ladder. It’s also given me a financial sense of freedom and a great feeling of stability. The earning potential is uncapped, unlike with other jobs where there are defined salary bands. You’re the master of your own destiny when it comes to what you earn. I’ve also had the opportunity to travel around the world, visiting New York, South Africa and Iceland, most notably. Also, unlike a lot of scientific jobs where it’s difficult to focus on any other areas, in recruitment you have the opportunity to diversify. For example, I could go down a technical route because I’ve got the skillset to understand how a drug company works. I could also opt to work in-house at a life science company as a talent acquisition specialist, or even move into a consultancy. There aren’t too many avenues working in a scientific role, unless you’re much further on in your career. The most important draw for me however, is the variety recruitment provides in my day-to-day life. Instead of working on one scientific experiment or project in a lab, I’m working with such a broad range of life science companies with a huge variety of projects that span the entire spectrum of the life science industry. I’ve been exposed to some really interesting and ground-breaking work that our clients are undertaking. What have you found most challenging about recruitment? As I’ve said before, recruitment has its challenges. I found it tough at first to adjust to working full-time, being on the phone a lot and of course, the pressure of hitting targets. At university, I was used to pressure but it came in shorter bursts. In recruitment, the pressure is less intense but more constant. But it’s definitely what you need to keep motivated and to push yourself. I found targets and expectations quite daunting at first, but soon realised that targets are set according to your abilities and potential. Eventually I understood that they weren’t unrealistic or unachievable, and this was an important shift of mentality for me. What were your breakthrough moments? Definitely when I made my first placement. That’s when I felt like I’d cracked it, I understood how it worked - even though it took me a little longer than most. There was a huge sense of pride that I’d successfully managed a process from start to finish. When I brought in my first client, that was also a significant moment. A company genuinely wanted to work with ProClinical because of me and my ability to help them. That’s a rewarding feeling. Ultimately, becoming a team lead was a huge breakthrough. I realised I had the capabilities to advise and help others succeed, too. It’s so fulfilling to see your team member make a placement knowing that you’ve played a part in helping them get there. 10 reasons to consider a life sciences recruitment careerHow to get a job in recruitmentWhat makes a successful recruitment consultant? Were there transferable skills from your academic background that helped you in recruitment? Initially, I was concerned that I didn’t have any sales experience. But I soon realised I already had a lot of the skills I needed thanks to my academic/scientific background. For instance, I had to do a lot of presentations when I was studying and when working at the lab, and this has come in really useful as it taught me to speak clearly and concisely. These communication skills have enabled me to speak to different types of audiences - peers, candidates, hiring managers, HR and even CEOs of companies - which is key to success in this career. Also, sales experience isn’t necessary as long as you have the ability to understand and convey complex messages, which I certainly did thanks to my background. My scientific understanding and industry knowledge helps clients and candidates alike to trust that I really know what I’m doing. Any tricks of the trade? The one thing that recruiters don’t always do that they should is learn how to build genuine relationships with people. That’s what helps you stand out against other recruiters. For example, when you take the time to develop a relationship with a candidate, it could span many months or even years. You could end up helping them climb their own career ladder as someone they trust and genuinely want to continue working with. It’s the same with clients. ProClinical trains you to understand that the services we offer are a ‘value-add’ to their business, instead of a financial drain or a necessary evil. We’re taught to add the knowledge, experience and resources that the company doesn’t have, helping them to reach their goals more efficiently. So basically, grasping that recruitment is about good communication, striking up genuine relationships and being extremely organised will set you apart from the competition. Any advice to life science students/graduates considering recruitment? I really recommend it. I chose recruitment not because I didn’t have a passion for science anymore, but because it was a balance of everything for me. A varied, challenging job that kept me close (much closer than I thought) to the industry I was interested in. As I’ve progressed, I’ve actually felt more immersed in the industry than I did when I was doing lab work. For example, I recently went to Iceland to visit a client’s manufacturing facility to see how their drugs are developed. Recruitment is challenging but I’d choose it again every time because what you get back in return for your hard work far surpasses what I could expect working in industry. Are you currently studying or have recently graduated with a life science degree? Whether you dream of making a difference to people's lives, climbing the career ladder or having the opportunity to travel or relocate abroad, we can get you there. We provide real opportunities for consultants to progress and an excellent training and development programme to help boost you up the career ladder. Whether you dream of contributing to medical research or taking on leadership responsibility, you’ll have everything you need to make an impact.Think you've got what it takes to be a successful life sciences recruitment consultant? Find out more. About ProClinical:ProClinical is a leading international life sciences consultancy that helps experienced professionals find contract and permanent jobs, and provides life science companies with a range of solutions to fix business critical needs. Our clients include leading global brands and smaller emerging companies within pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices and clinical research.

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Top 10 Contract Research Organisations (CROs) to Watch in 2019

Top 10 Contract Research Organisations (CROs) to Watch in 2019

Contract research organisations (CROs) are essential to the pharma, biotech, and MedTech industries. They support clients’ efforts to test, refine, and market the latest pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Our list of the top CROs to watch profiles the industry's leaders and emerging companies.  The global CRO market value reached $39 billion in 2018 and is expected to exceed $44 billion by 2021, as patent expiration, proliferation of generic medications, and technological innovations like mHealth and big data influence product development all leading to greater outsourcing of work to CROs.  At the same time, the CRO marketplace is becoming increasingly competitive: a trend of mergers and acquisitions enhance larger companies’ full-service capabilities and international reach. Other mid-sized and smaller CROs are focusing on niche sectors and a more personalised approach to their sponsors. The growing market is also creating a wealth of new clinical research jobs for candidates and clinical recruitment agencies in major hubs throughout Europe, the USA, and emerging markets in Asia Pacific countries.  With expansions, consolidations, and innovations continuing throughout the CRO industry, 2019 is sure to be another year of change and excitement for large and small CROs alike, as well as boosting employment through increased demand for Clinical trial assistants (CTA) and clinical research associates (CRA). in the pharmaceutical sectors and beyond. The below top ten CROs to watch in 2019 are listed in no particular order but include both industry leaders by market share and revenue, and up-and-comers who are steadily increasing their presence through strategic partnerships and innovative service offerings.  PPD   Pharmaceutical Product Development (PPD) is a leading CRO that operates in 48 countries across the globe. They are considered a premium CRO provider for many pharma and biotech companies globally. In May 2019, PPD was recognised by biotech industry leaders as top supplier based on their capability, compatibility and expertise in assisting clinical research programmes. After acquiring Evidera in 2016, PPD solidified itself as a leader in real-world research. The company has leveraged Evidera’s real-world evidence expertise to provide life science companies with an increasingly crucial element of the clinical development process, helping PPD to remain competitive. We can expect even greater things from PPD in the coming year thanks to their acquisition of Synexus, a patient recruitment company, in 2018. Soon after, PPD launched a new enrollment model that ‘inverts’ the typical site-first approach, instead identifying potential participants first before delivering them on-site. This allows for more rapid enrolment from the company’s established databases and modelling. MedPaceA mid-sized CRO, MedPace focuses on clinical research for drugs and devices globally. Unlike many of the larger CROs, MedPace have not invested time and effort in acquisitions but instead chosen to reinvest in their own workforce. This has led to them experiencing growth organically rather than externally by acquiring other well-established CROs. They have a focus on an office-based culture, which is certainly interesting in the ever-evolving CRO business which is heavily home-based.MedPace’s smaller size helps them retain the intimacy of a cohesive office culture. This is thought to directly affect how employees feel about the job and how they interact with clients on a daily basis, offering a unique service. This CRO is one to watch as it’s one of the few that is steadily growing yet hasn’t acquired or been acquired. Will they be acquired or put in a bid to acquire a small CRO to further their growth? How long can they keep their independence? Clintec  Clintec was a Scottish women-owned independent CRO, before its acquisition by IQVIA, that specialises in oncology and rare disease clinical research services. The company is medium-sized but has a global reach across 50 countries, including several emerging markets such as Sub-Saharan Africa. Clintec has enjoyed annual growth of 55% since 2017 and is one of the fastest-growing CROs in the UK. Despite its acquisition by CRO giant IQVIA the company has continued to operate quite independently. It will be interesting to see whether Clintec follow in the steps of Novella which was acquired by the group in 2013. Novella operated independently for many years and was rebranded as IQVIA Biotech in 2018. Clintec’s ethos has remained largely unchanged and there seems to be a scope for movement and autonomy, bolstered by the support of their giant CRO parent company.   PRA Health Sciences   PRA is an American CRO established in 1982 but was only brought public following it’s acquisition by Kohlberg Kravis Roberts in 2014. PRA’s drive toward international markets has grown since the company went public, with a specific focus on Singapore, China and other regional sectors. In 2018, the company was named best CRO in Asia by BioPharm Asia and in the same year, their global coverage expanded to 85 countries. PRA has an excellent company culture, with a low staff turnover compared with other big CRO players in the industry. The company’s growing impact on the industry is mostly thanks to it’s pioneering of the unique ‘embedded’ outsourcing model after acquiring ReSearch Pharmaceutical Services Inc (RPS) in 2013. This model, which recruits specialists before integrating them within their clients, is thought to be the future of the industry and is helping PRA differentiate its service within a very competitive landscape. KCR KCR is a small Polish CRO that has spent the last few years expanding through Europe, including Germany and UK, finding its feet and creating a more manageable presence. Last year, KCR opened their operations in the USA and has really begun to bid for business. Their growing impact on the industry is the pride they take in a human approach, with a belief that there is a human behind every number. KCR’s services are closely related to patient data and patient recruitment and it will be interesting to see them continue to develop rapidly in this space. ICON This top-tier CRO posted revenues of $2.4 billion in 2018 – an impressive 7.9% increase since 2017 - and has completed a series of acquisitions in recent years, including ICHOM, Genomics England and most recently, MolecularMD in early 2019. In 2016 Icon partnered with Genomics England on the UKs 100,000 Genomes Project, and IBM Watson for oncology research support to further expand service offerings and clinical research jobs in the genomic science and oncology sectors. However, ICON is currently the on the watch list thanks to its acquisition of MAPI Group, a French late stage focused CRO which has helped them boost their real-world evidence (RWE) foothold hugely. ICON is certainly one to watch for giving other CRO giants like IQVIA competition for this key driver in clinical development. IQVIA The company adopted the name IQVIA in 2017 following the merger of Quintiles and information and technology group IMS, which offers their clients an end-to-end clinical and commercial service. It is currently the largest CRO in the world, with a $10.4 billion revenue in 2018. After a string of further acquisitions of smaller specialist companies, the company is going from strength to strength and are truly at the forefront of the CRO world. This is particularly true in the real-world evidence and data space. Currently the services they provide are unparalleled by other leading CROs but it is worth watching how IQVIA will navigate emerging key drivers of the industry, such as digital health and artificial intelligence. PSI PSI is a fast growing CRO that specialises in a range of fields such as oncology, haematology, infectious diseases and multiple sclerosis. The company has a very close-knit culture and their leading philosophy was established by the CEO/Founder - to create a CRO that he himself would like to work with. Originally a European head-quartered CRO, PSI quickly expanded into the USA and has operated there for 14 years. However, since 2017 the company has further globalised their business into the APAC region, opening offices in Australia and South Korea in 2017 and most recently, India and Hong Kong. Parexel In 2018, industry giant Parexel achieved $2.4 billion in revenues as it pursues cost-controlling measures and expansion into lower-cost emerging markets. while simultaneously forging partnerships with Eli Lilly to develop clinical research in China, and SHYFT to deliver better real-world data studies. In 2017, Parexel was bought by Pamplona, a private equity firm, which has served to bolster their profit margin as well as the quality of their market-leading services to biotechnology companies across the globe. Covance   Purchased by LabCorp in early 2015, Covance boasted annual revenues greater than $2.5 billion before its acquisition, and now achieves full year revenue of $11.3 billion in 2018. Covance’s future looks brighter still following its acquisition of top 10 CRO Chiltern in 2017, which is a specialist oncology organisation and will bring cancer patients innovative medicines faster. The acquisition has planted Covance as a leader in the oncology space and will enable the company to work with a wide and interesting range of oncology clients. ProClinical is currently recruiting for a number of vacancies at many of the leading CROs listed above. If you are interested in working at one of the top contract research organisations in the world, please upload your CV to our candidate database or apply online to some of our current live jobs.  <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'b067d5a2-f614-49b3-add3-d906762f610a', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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ProClinical Honoured as Top Supplier by KellyOCG® for Superior Workforce Solutions

ProClinical Honoured as Top Supplier by KellyOCG® for Superior Workforce Solutions

London, UK 3rd May, 2019ProClinical was recently recognised by KellyOCG®, the outsourcing and consulting group of Kelly Services, with a Supplier Excellence Award at events in Troy, Michigan and Amsterdam, Netherlands. The award is presented to top-performing national and global suppliers that provide superior workforce solutions, and whose service, results and strategic partnerships have made a significant impact on KellyOCG's business.   “We are honoured to present ProClinical with this award for their outstanding efforts to provide diverse delivery models and capabilities. Our partnership with our suppliers are key to supporting our global customers as help them determine what’s next for their workforce planning and talent needs,” said Thorsten Koletschka, VP and Global Lead Supplier Strategy & Engagement, Global Professional Services Organization for KellyOCG. ProClinical's US team receiving their Supplier Excellence Award This year, KellyOCG recognized 19 of its top suppliers from Europe, the United States and Asia Pacific. Suppliers are evaluated on three criteria: Scorecard results of their performance within KellyOCG-managed programsCompliance with legal and program-specific requirementsEngagement survey results from KellyOCG stakeholders assessing the ease of doing business with the supplier and the supplier’s partnership approach Award-winning organisations receive one-on-one development sessions; a designated KellyOCG representative to support their business growth; participation in supplier focus groups; access to KellyOCG’s supplier insight; and the ability to work directly with KellyOCG senior leaders. About ProClinical ProClinical is a leading global staffing services provider that specialises exclusively within the life sciences industry. Our client base includes leading global pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, medical device and health tech pioneers, and associated life science companies, including CROs and the outsourcing sector. About KellyOCGKellyOCG is the leading global advisor of talent supply chain strategies and workforce solutions.  We align talent strategy to business goals to define what’s next for the future of work, enabling our clients to ditch the script on the old way of thinking.  Through our vertical expertise and trusted advisor status with our clients, we make meaningful connections between talent and organizations, advancing careers and business goals. Visit www.kellyocg.com.

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Top skills you need to be a successful contractor in the life sciences industry

Top skills you need to be a successful contractor in the life sciences industry

You’ve got the knowledge and expertise to do your job well. But a contractor needs a whole host of other skills to be truly successful in a competitive industry. What many don’t realise is that so many of the necessary skills involve communicating and collaborating with other people, debunking myths that contractors are simply lone wolves with sought-after skill-sets. ProClinical has a long history of helping contractors thrive in their career and we know what clients value most. In our experience, these are the top skills you need to be a successful contractor: Adaptability For those seasoned in contracting, you’ll know that no contract is the same. To thrive in each new working environment, you’ll have to be very good performing well as you adapt. There are new systems and processes to get used to, as well as new faces and different team structures. As a hired specialist, you’ll be expected to hit the ground running so adapting quickly to your surroundings is important. Pro-activity As a contractor, you are very much in the driving seat of your career progression. Without a permanent employer, it is harder to access training and development courses/programmes. These are needed to keep your knowledge and skills up-to-date, which as a contractor, are your most important assets. Therefore, to ensure the longevity of your contracting career, you must always be proactive in learning new skills and consolidating your expertise. A proactive mindset will also ensure you always have another contract lined up before your current one finishes. This helps increase your sense of security and financial stability. Do contractors really have less job security?Should contractors consider relocating abroad for a job?How to boost your contracting career with a remediation project Organisation Unless you opt to use an umbrella company, being self-employed with your own limited company comes with some responsibility. Contractors are very self-reliant so all the things that an employer usually deals with behind the scenes such as tax, pensions and payroll, must be managed by you. As there is no holiday allowance provided by clients, you will also have to arrange and negotiate this yourself. This requires a good deal of forward planning and good organisational skills. Not sure whether to choose an umbrella company or setup a limited company? Soft skills Even though your technical expertise is your main bargaining chip, the very best contractors hone their soft skills, too. These skills focus more on how you come across and the way you communicate. Having good social skills will help you assimilate well into each workplace. Superior communication skills help to engage effectively with different types of people, including colleagues, project managers, stakeholders and suppliers. Working under pressure and flexibility are soft skills that are fundamental to the nature of contracting. And, as we said before, contractors aren’t always lone wolves. You must be able to problem solve and work well in team to approach challenges in a collaborative way - all with a cool and level-head. Networking Networking is a universally useful skill, but can be particularly helpful for contractors. Building a network of other contractors, previous clients and recruitment partners can help you move smoothly from one contract to another. This will minimise the dreaded ‘downtime’ and increase your career stability. It also means less reliance on job boards. You can make use of networking tools like LinkedIn to connect with clients and other contractors you have worked with. They can endorse both your technical and ‘soft’ skills on the platform to boost your profile. This will make you look more appealing to prospective clients and also keep you connected with previous contacts, which could result in recurring opportunities. Similarly, staying in close contact with a recruitment partner is another way to line up contracts so you’re never out of work. Sales skills Many contractors don’t realise the importance of ‘selling’ when looking for a new contract. You may fall into the trap of trying to stand out by using competitive pricing. In reality, clients are expecting to pay a lot for the expertise and experience that they lack - especially when you are fixing business critical problems. Therefore, to secure the remuneration you deserve, unleash your inner salesman! Start thinking of your knowledge as a service or product you are selling to the client and learn how to leverage your in-demand experience when negotiating terms. Keeping abreast of market-rates and the changing demand of your skill-set will help to guide your negotiations. CV-writing skills Once you learn how to ‘sell’ your knowledge, you can apply the same technique to improve your CV or resume writing skills. When sending your profile to a client it should be tailored to their business needs to show that you are the most qualified person for the job. You should highlight the most relevant skills and experience you have fixing similar issues to demonstrate clearly how you would solve their problems. Learning how to present your technical expertise, experience and various ‘soft’ skills in a balanced yet effective way on your CV/resume will give you an edge over the competition. Interviewing An interview is your chance to demonstrate in person to the client that you have both the technical skills and soft skills needed to excel in the role. There are several ways to hone your interviewing skills specifically for contract positions. Top tips include knowing how to engage with your interviewer depending on their technical understanding and asking the right questions about the project to show you’re interested. Download our Contractors Interview guidebook for a more in-depth look at how to conduct yourself at a contract interview. For more advice on contracting, check out our career advice blog! If you’d like to give your contracting career a boost, considering working with ProClinical to find your next opportunity. With a variety of opportunities with many different life science companies across the globe - we’re sure to have the right opportunity for you. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'b067d5a2-f614-49b3-add3-d906762f610a', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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7 innovative biotechnology companies in California to watch in 2019

7 innovative biotechnology companies in California to watch in 2019

Although California is best known as the home of Silicon Valley, it is also the birthplace of ‘Biotech Bay’, a hotbed of biotechnology innovation concentrated in the Northern part of the region. Nearly half of the top 20 biotechs in the USA are headquartered there and many smaller, innovative organisations are springing up at various other hubs across the state. The demand for biologic drugs is only set to rise in line with the increasing rate of scientific breakthroughs. Here are just 7 of the many cutting-edge biotechs in California to watch in 2019: Aimmune Therapeutics Brisbane Food allergies are thought to affect 15 million people in America and 17 million across Europe. There are currently no approved treatments or cures for food allergies, which is a serious issue as reactions can have very harmful and even life-threatening symptoms. Aimmune Therapeutics is developing desensitization treatments that make exposures to food allergens less dangerous to patients. Their primary product, AR101 for peanut allergies, is currently undergoing Phase III clinical trials. Recent results are very positive with 50% of patients tolerating the single highest dose of peanut protein. There were also no serious side effects, such as anaphylaxis, reported. Therefore, before long AR101 could be the first approved therapy for a peanut allergy, which currently affects nearly 2 million children in America.   Guardant Health Redwood City Guardant Health, a precision oncology biotech, already has two successfully launched blood tests to diagnose late-stage cancer. However, their current aim is to develop a blood test that can detect cancer earlier and also monitor recurrence in cancer survivors. The blood tests are attempting to overcomes the difficulties that current screening methods are up against in detecting lung, colorectal and breast cancers. If successful, the tests will be particularly useful for high-risk populations, ensuring the disease is caught at the most easily-treatable stage possible. They can also be used as a follow-up to see if surgeries to remove early-stage cancer have been successful. The product, Lunar Assay, is currently available for research use only, primarily by academic research networks and biopharmas working in this space. Avanir Aliso Viejo   Millions of people suffer from complex central nervous system (CNS) disorders and there is currently no straightforward way to treat them effectively. Their pipeline spans a range of CNS conditions including migraines, Alzheimer’s, dementia, schizophrenia and traumatic brain injury. Their leading product, AVP-825, is a Phase IV treatment developed to treat acute migraines in adolescents aged 12-17. Their leading Phase III CNS treatments are focused on reducing agitation for patients with Alzheimer’s disease. In March 2019, Avanir stated that initial data from studies were encouraging, showing a significant improvement in some patients suffering with moderate-to-severe agitation. As Alzheimer’s disease affects nearly 6 million people in America, Avanir’s treatments could provide some relief in this area of unmet medical need. FibroGen San Francisco This specialist biopharma is harnessing the natural pathways of the body’s immune system to treat the chronic and life-threatening diseases of anaemia, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and pancreatic cancer. What makes them unique is their expertise in the biology of central mediators and internal pathways. This has led to the development of their leading product, Roxadustat, which treats anaemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The treatment works by inducing the body’s natural coordinated process of red blood cell production, which increases iron absorption, mobilisation and transport. Also in development is Pamrevlumab, a Phase II treatment for pancreatic cancer, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Notably, the treatment works without the need for supplemental intravenous iron. Vir Biotechnology, IncSan Francisco Vir Biotechnology has a vision to create a world without infectious diseases. Vir is using a multi-platform approach to tackle some of the most serious chronic and life-threatening infectious diseases today. These include HIV, hepatitis B, tuberculosis and serious respiratory diseases like influenza, RSV and MPV. Their technology enables the development of antibodies that have passed natural selection by the immune system in response to viral and bacterial disease. Late in 2018, the company announced that, along with Alnylam, they had launched a Phase I/II study of VIR-2218 to treat chronic hepatitis B. VIR-2218 is a novel RNA interference therapeutic that aims to remove the need for life-long treatment, as is the current situation for patients. Bridge Bio Palo Alto Bridge Bio work at the intersection of genetic research and medicine to provide therapies for patients with a genetic disease. They use genome sequencing, molecular biology and patient information databases to target the mechanisms of genetic disease, including many rare and ultra-rare diseases. After targeting the known ‘drivers’ of a genetic disease, they aim to develop precision medicines to provide effective therapies for patients. Bridge Bio currently have three therapies in Phase III clinical trials, all of which target devastating rare diseases. Adamas Pharmaceuticals. Inc Emeryville Adamas is a biopharmaceutical company that exists to lessen the burden of chronic neurological diseases that affect millions globally such as epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. As there is limited understanding of how the human brain works as well as the causes of many of these conditions, they have been very difficult to treat. Therefore, Adamas has taken a new approach: researching time-dependent patterns in diseases to reshape the timing of medicines to maximise the effectiveness of treatments. They do this by studying patterns and pathway sequences and matching timing of drugs to suit these patterns. Adamas already have a commercially available drug for dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease, and have a treatment for multiple sclerosis and epilepsy in their pipeline. Working in the biotechnology industry is not only extremely rewarding but also very exciting. Those looking for biotech jobs in California are more likely to be on the forefront of breakthroughs than anywhere else on the planet. Interested? ProClinical works with many biotechnology companies in California, from leading companies to the smaller specialist and start-up companies featured here. See here for our latest biotech jobs. 

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What to do if you're struggling to fill a vacancy

What to do if you're struggling to fill a vacancy

Life science companies depend heavily on recruiting skilled professionals for the research and development of innovative drugs and devices that help them grow and remain competitive.  Therefore, the longer a vacancy exists in your company the  more recruitment costs continue to rise, as does loss of revenue for the company and reduced productivity within the team. External factors compound these difficulties as in-house talent acquisition and HR functions face increasing skill shortages within the life sciences industry.  To win in the war for talent life science companies must have tactics in place to fill vacancies quickly and suitably. Here are some recruitment techniques to consider when struggling to fill a vacancy: Advertising When competing for a small pool of talent, it is often not enough to advertise a vacancy on the company ‘Work for Us’ page. It’s unlikely the professionals you need will be looking regularly on your recruitment pages, even if you’re a market leader. Therefore, it’s a good idea to find cost-effective ways to advertise the vacancy on job boards and social media. The most important consideration is to choose the right platform to maximise your outreach to the candidates you most want to attract. You could opt for advertising on broader job boards like Indeed but run the risk of having a larger but less specific reach. To target more specialist candidates, you could go with life science specific job boards like PharmiWeb, Emed or BioSpace. You can also seek out job boards tailored to specific fields such as engineering or scientific research. Although the reach may be smaller, you’ll get the job advert in front of more relevant and higher quality candidates. You can also use social media platforms such as LinkedIn to enhance your advertising. There are 560 million active professionals on LinkedIn today. You can easily create a job advert that target candidates by criteria you can select, including job title, area of expertise, industry and years of experience. This is a more costly option but LinkedIn allows you to monitor the performance of your adverts, so you can hone them over time and make them as attractive and effective as possible. When creating engaging adverts consider: Adverts should be well written and contain the relevant information and keywords to pique their interest. This means you get more relevant applications, cutting down the time needed to sift through them,Are you offering the right salary? A sure way to put candidates off is to advertise a below average salary, or one that doesn’t match the required skills and experience. Referrals A simple yet effective way of filling a vacancy is to ask existing and past employees/candidates if they know anyone in their network that would be suitable for the job.  88% of employers say referrals are their first choice when it comes to above-average applications, according to Medium Corporation. Once hired, research also suggests candidates are more likely to stay at your company - with a 45% retention rate after two years, compared with only 20% if they’d gone through a job board. You could create an email template to send out asking for referrals and offering an attractive incentive - such as a voucher or lump sum. Recruitment process Improving your recruitment process is a sure way to increase your appeal as an employer, making it more likely that a high-quality candidate will accept your offer. Creating a positive experience for prospective candidates during the application and interview process is vital, as they’re likely to be comparing their experience with that of your competitors - who also want to hire them.   To ensure your company’s recruitment process leads to a successful hire, consider the following: There should be a straightforward process for applying for the vacancy. If it’s not obvious or too hard, candidates may be put off.Keep the time between initial contact, interviews and offer to a minimum. Waiting too long in between stages increases the risk of the candidate disengaging and going to a competitor. Invest in some recruiting software such as Spark Hire or an applicant tracking system (ATS) to help you select the most suitable candidates for interviewPay attention to feedback. Candidates really value receiving timely feedback following phone and face-to-face interviews. Studies have proved that openness and honesty in the recruitment process is a real competitive advantage in becoming an employer of choice Even for the candidates you don’t hire, you may wish to call upon them again for a future vacancy. Therefore, positive candidate experiences help you develop and maintain ongoing relationships with a network of professionals. This builds a talent pipeline you can call upon in future, and you’ll have an instant advantage against competitors because candidates will value their existing relationship with you more. Employer brand Something that is not exactly an easy fix but pays off in the long run is improving your employer brand. Employer brand is a broad term that describes a company’s identity, including their reputation to customers, clients and prospective employees. Research shows that employer brand plays a significant part in a company’s ability to attract and retain talent. In a world where the best talent can cherry-pick where they work, having a first-rate employer brand is a company’s best shot at securing them for these hard-fill vacancies. Do some research into how candidates view your company as an employer. If you’re not well known, it’s even more important to focus on promoting a positive image and message. Improving your scores on review sites like Glassdoor and Trust Pilot will help to promote a good employer image, as jobseekers trust the opinions of fellow candidates. Another way to improve is to carry out engagement surveys with existing employees to pinpoint any weaknesses and implement a plan to fix them. Diversity You may be struggling to fill a vacancy because you adhere too closely to a predefined ‘cultural fit’. While it’s important to employ someone you shares similar values with the company, you may be missing out on the benefits of variety. Certainly, you should always consider candidates of different ages, ethnicities and genders, but what about those with different perspectives and opinions or a new way of doing things? This approach increases your scope of potential candidates, helping you fill that vacancy faster.   Specialist recruitment Did you know that over 70% of in-house solutionsfail to fill either all or 90% of vacancies themselves? You’re certainly not alone in your struggles to fill vacancies, particularly when looking for professionals with specialist and niche skillsets. While the above suggestions will certainly increase the likelihood of filling your vacancy, not many have the time and resources to put them in place. Therefore, those in this position can pass the burden over to a specialist staffing company that will source, vet and shortlist quality and suitable candidates to fill the vacancy. Try not to be put off by the cost, because as long as a vacancy remains unfilled, costs build up rapidly. You will end up spending more through loss of productivity, advertising and interim cover than you would had you engaged their services from day one. And the time-to-hire will be far less. An added bonus is that these companies are recruitment experts and will help you manage many of the above suggestions - including free advertising on my platforms! Specialist life science staffing companies can offer a variety of recruitment solutions that will suit each vacancy. For example, ProClinical can help you place one-off permanent candidates, known as direct hire, or a contractor to work on a project in the short term. However, one of ProClinical’s most useful services when battling with the current skills shortage is Executive Search. This is when a staffing company utilises their broad network to help you hire specialist people with niche skillsets who are typically very hard to find. When an individual is in demand, they are less likely to be active on job boards and social media, so only staffing companies that have established relationships with them will be able to engage them. Find out more about how Executive Search could help you fill your specialist vacancy. For more information on how ProClinical’s services can help you fill a long-standing vacancy, please register it here or contact us today!  

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Who are the top 10 pharmaceutical companies in the world? (2019)

Who are the top 10 pharmaceutical companies in the world? (2019)

               The global pharmaceutical industry reached unprecedented heights in 2018, being estimated at an astounding $1.11 trillion. By 2020, this figure is set to rise to $1.43 trillion. With rising pressure to develop drugs to meet ever increasing global demand, pharmaceutical companies continue to work tirelessly to bring the most innovative and cutting-edge treatments to patients. Being a research-driven industry, approximately $150 billion is spent by pharmaceutical companies every year on research and development projects. Out of thousands of compounds, only a small percentage gain regulatory approval to be used by patients to treat disease and improve quality of life. However, in 2018, a record number of novel drugs developed by pharmaceutical companies across the globe were approved by various regulatory bodies. A large proportion were approved by the US regulatory body, the FDA, which approved 55 novel drugs and smashed its record for generic approvals (781 up from 763 in 2017). Although the USA’s market share of the global pharmaceutical industry is worth over $341.1 billion, the Chinese, South East Asian, Eastern European and South American markets are beginning to emerge. For example, the Chinese market is rich with preclinical and early-phase drugs, and is a growing nucleus of biotech activity. The next few years will see global growth thanks to the increasing wealth worldwide, as well as increasing demand to maintain high levels of innovation to combat unmet medical need. ProClinical has ranked the leading pharmaceutical companies according to 2018 revenue from their pharmaceutical segment only. Below is a list of the top 10 biggest pharma companies in the world in 2019: Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) US $22.6 billionA new entry into the top 10 pharma list is Bristol-Myers Squibb, a leading American pharmaceutical company headquartered in New York City. BMS specialises in four key therapy areas: oncology, cardiovascular, immunoscience and fibrosis. The company's strong growth in 2018 can be in part attributed to continued success of leading drugs Opdivo (cancer) and Eliquis (a blood thinner). BMS' success is likely to be further boosted following the company's planned acquisiton of Celgene - an innovative oncology biotech - in early 2019. This strategic acquisition will help position BMS as a leading biopharma player thanks to Celgene's robust pipeline. GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)US $23 billionA staple candidate in the top 10 pharma list year on year, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) is a leading British pharmaceutical company that always boasts a strong pipeline of innovative drugs. The company specialises in a broad range of therapy areas but is particularly successful in the fields of HIV/AIDS, respiratory and vaccines. The company enjoyed 2% revenue growth compared with 2017 figures, with sales being boosted by GSK’s best-selling HIV drugs Trivicay and Triumeq, the Ellipta inhaler for asthma and COPD and Nucala, another successful asthma treatment. Last year GSK saw the key approval of Shingrix, developed to treat the shingles virus, which was very successful in 2018 as expected, with sales reaching £784 million. In general, growth was slightly offset by steep generic competition in 2018 for various GSK drugs like Seretide, Epizixom and Avodart.  AmgenUS $23.7 billion Amgen is an American biopharmaceutical company headquartered in California that specialises in developing novel human therapeutics, with a focus on cardiovascular disease, oncology, bone health, neuroscience, nephrology, and inflammation. The company is steadily becoming a permanent fixture on this top 10 list. This change is in part due to the success of various Amgen products, including Repatha (72% increase yoy), BLINCYTO® (31% increase yoy) and Prolia® (16% increase yoy). In early 2019, Amgen was voted one of Fortune Magazine’s Most Admired Companies in the pharmaceutical industry and was listed number 5 on Fast Company's 2019 Most Innovative companies.  AbbVieUS $32.8 billionResearch-driven American biopharma AbbVie has maintained its position on this list, with an impressive increase of 16.2% compared with 2017 pharma revenue statistics. AbbVie has recently announced that upadacitinib, one of their most anticipated drugs in development that will be used to treat moderate to severe atopic dermatitis, has been granted breakthrough therapy designation by the FDA. This is just one of the many promising pipelined drugs in AbbVie’s varied portfolio which spans multiple therapy areas, including dermatology, oncology, neurology and gastroenterology. Boosting revenue is AbbVie’s top selling drugs Humira, the current bestselling drug in the world and Imbruvica, one of today’s leading cancer drugs. NovartisUS $34.9 billionOne of the leading pharmaceutical companies in Switzerland, Novartis comfortably makes the top 10 pharma list for 2019. The company focuses on a wide range of disease areas including oncology, immunology/dermatology, neuroscience and respiratory. The company's revenue grew by 5.8% compared with 2017 figures despite a few top selling drugs facing generic competition in major markets, such as as oncology success Gleevec, and blood pressure drugs Diovan and Exforge. To combat these losses, Novartis spent 18% of their overall 2017 revenue on research & development in 2018. Currently, Novartis' best selling drugs are Gilenya, for multiple sclerosis, and Lucentis, for patients suffering from eye-degenerative diseases. Merck & Co US $39.7 billionAmerican pharmaceutical company Merck takes a spot as one of the top 5 pharmaceutical companies in the world in 2018. Merck is known as MSD outside of North America. The company develops drugs, vaccines and biologics in many areas including cardiovascular, oncology, endocrinology and infectious disease. The company saw an impressive 12.2% revenue growth since 2017 with sales boosted by the continued success of Merck’s bestselling drugs: cancer immunotherapy Keytruda, HPV vaccine Gardasil and diabetes pill Januvia.  SanofiUS $39.3 billion4th on the top 10 pharma list is French pharmaceutical company, Sanofi. The company saw 7.1%% revenue growth within its pharmaceutical sector, which contributes a substantial percentage of the company’s total revenue. Over 25% of this revenue came from Sanofi’s three best selling drugs, Lantus, an insulin injection for diabetes, Lovenox, an anticoagulant to prevent blood clots, and Aubagio, the one-daily pill to treat a form of multiple sclerosis.  Johnson & Johnson US $40.7 billionIn the top 3 pharmaceutical companies in the world is Johnson & Johnson, a company that was established over 130 years ago and has become a staple household name thanks to popular consumer goods like Aveeno, Neutrogena and Listerine. The notable 12.1% growth can be in part attributed to its acquisition of biopharmaceutical company Actelion in 2017, which contributed a 3.4% increase in 2018 thanks to its pulmonary arterial hypertension portfolio. Other drivers of growth included best-selling drugs Stelara, Darzalex and Zytiga. RocheUS $45.6 billionSwiss pharmaceutical company, Roche, is the 2nd biggest pharmaceutical company in the world for 2019, and employs 94,442 people worldwide. The company develops innovative drugs and devices in a number of key indications, such as oncology, immunology, infectious diseases and neuroscience. Annual growth from the pharmaceutical segment was 2.7% and revenue from the top 3 products contributed over 40% of Roche’s total revenue in 2018 ($57.2 bn). Roche’s best-selling drugs also happen to be in the world’s top cancer drugs: Herceptin, Avastin and Rituxan. Roche's CEO, Severan Schwan reported that new medicines in accounted for 90% of the company's growth in 2018, particularly the launch of Ocrevus, said to be the most successful in Roche's history. PfizerUS $53.7 billionThe world’s largest pharmaceutical company is multinational pharma giant Pfizer, headquartered in Connecticut, USA. The research-based company has a varied portfolio that spans many therapy areas, including immunology, oncology, neurosciences and rare diseases. Despite modest revenue growth, Pfizer had a very successful year in 2018. The company received several FDA approvals, particularly in oncology, and many of its best-selling products have many years of patent protection remaining. There was particular growth with some of Pfizer’s key products, including Ibrance, Eliquis and Xeljanz.ProClinical is a specialist recruitment company operating exclusively in the life science industry. Every day we have new job opportunities arising at top 10 pharmaceutical companies across the globe. Simply upload your CV to start getting matched with pharmaceutical jobs at leading companies that could transform your career. Source <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'b067d5a2-f614-49b3-add3-d906762f610a', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->                                                                                                                                       

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The most successful cancer drugs in 2019

The most successful cancer drugs in 2019

As many as 1,688,780 people in the US alone expect to be diagnosed with cancer this year, leading to an unprecedented and skyrocketing demand for better oncology drugs and treatments. Cancer is one of the most feared diagnosis among patients, with over 200 types of the disease as it can affect almost every organ or tissue in the body. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are making incredible strides forward with the development of many innovative and effective treatments for some of the leading causes of death in the world, one of which is lung cancer. Despite increasing cases, survival rates of cancer are improving significantly meaning that cancer is no longer a death sentence for many. ProClinical has compiled the top 10 list of best cancer drugs in 2018, thanks to their outstanding success so far in treating various types of cancer.10. Neulasta$1.11 bnAmgenThis cancer drug has been specifically developed to combat a particular side effect of breast cancer chemotherapy - neutropenia - which is a low count of white blood cells that leaves patients vulnerable to infection. Taken after each cycle of chemo, Neulasta works by stimulating bone marrow to produce more white blood cells which helps the body restore its ability to fight infection. The drug has proven effective in cutting down the duration of severe neutropenia to 1.7 days instead of 5-7 days.9. Ibrance$1.13 bnPfizerIbrance, a targeted biologic therapy used for chemotherapy, has been developed to treat breast cancer - the most common type of cancer. The drug has been approved to use on advanced and secondary cases of breast cancer, and is administered in combination with a hormone therapy. Ibrance works by blocking the effects oestrogen (a female hormone), which stimulates the growth of tumours. This helps slow down the progress of the disease. In November 2018, a phase 3 trial showed that when Ibrance was combined with Faslodex, it significantly extended the lives of patients with advanced breast cancer, suggesting that the drug could soon be used as a new standard of care. 8. Opdivo$1.8 bnBristol Myers SquibbOpdivo is an immuno-therapy that uses a monoclonal antibody to stimulate the body's immune system to kill cancer cells. The drug has been approved to treat a multitude of different cancers, including skin, lung, head and neck, bladder and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Various studies into the effectiveness of Opdivo on different cancers suggested that it extended the life of 73% of skin cancer patients, 66% of lymphoma patients and 66.5% of bladder cancer patients.7. Imbruvica $2.6 bn Johnson & Johnson/Pharmacyclics Another bestselling oncology drug is tyrosine inhibitor Imbruvica. The drug is used to treat various B cell cancers such as mantle cell lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and Waldenstrӧm’s macroglobulinemia (a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma). According to a recent study, patients being treated with Imbruvica experienced a much better quality of life than those taking similar drugs. The drug also reportedly has a superior adverse event profile and was better tolerated by patients.6. Zytiga$3.5 bnJohnson & JohnsonZytiga is a hormone therapy drug developed to treat prostate cancer, the most prevalent cancer in men. The drug treats patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. As prostate cancer needs testosterone in order to spread, Zytiga works by blocking the enzyme, cytochrome p17, that helps produce it. This causes the tumour to either shrink or slow down. NICE reports that the drug not only extended life but improved quality of life, by reducing pain and improving mental and physical health.5. Keytruda$7.2 bnMerck & CoImmuno-therapy cancer drug, Keytruda, is made up of antibodies that boosts the body's ability to trigger an anti-tumour response that helps it attack cancer cells. It has been approved to treat many types of cancer, including non-small cell lung, classical Hodgkin lymphoma, melanoma, gastric and cervical cancer In 2019, Merck announced plans to fast track the use of Keytruda to treat prostate and head and neck cancer. Trials have shown a 44% reduction in risk of death or the disease worsening with Keytruda. 4. Rituxan $7.6 bn RocheRituxan (rituximab) is just one of Roche’s many cancer biologic success stories. The monoclonal antibody is used to treat many types of blood cancer including non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and some leukaemias, as well as for other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and vasculitis. The antibody works by attaching to B cells that will cause the cell to die (apoptosis). 3. Avastin$7.7 bnRocheMaking the top three cancer drugs in 2018 is Avastin (bevacizumab), taking another spot in Roche’s star portfolio of blockbuster oncology drugs.  The monoclonal antibody drug works by reducing the supply of oxygen and nutrients to a tumour and preventing the growth of new blood vessels. Contributing to its success is its ability to treat a variety of cancers including kidney, cervical, ovarian and brain tumours.2. Herceptin$7.9 bnRocheThe second top selling cancer drug, Herceptin (trastuzumab) another monoclonal antibody developed by Roche. The breast cancer drug is administered via injection and works by attaching itself to HER2 receptors on cancer cells to stop them from growing. Boasting a very high survival rate, Roche is currently looking to improve efficacy further by developing combination drugs. Back in 2017, various biopharmaceutical companies were granted permission to begin making Herceptin biosimilars that are now becoming accessible in large markets worldwide. In 2018, biosimilars Tranzimera (USA) and Ontruzant (Europe) were approved, providing more access for patients to this life-saving drug. 1. Revlimid$9.8 bnCelgeneTop of the best cancer drug list is Celgene's Revlimid (lenalidomide). This drug has been very successful in the treatment of multiple myeloma as it promotes immune responses that slow tumour growth. It is also used to treat myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Prior to the development of Revlimid, prognosis for patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma was poor so in the years following the drug’s entry to market, survival rates have soared.ProClinical is proud of the part that it plays in recruiting the skilled oncology professionals that help to develop new life saving cancer therapies. If you are interested in oncology jobs, please upload your CV to enable our specialist recruitment consultants to match your skills and experience with suitable roles.<!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '2a6fe3dc-c357-4095-b46f-69cb8c58ba43', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Jade Kinsella: From admin assistant to executive board member

Jade Kinsella: From admin assistant to executive board member

Jade Kinsella joined ProClinical in August 2009 as an admin assistant at a time when ProClinical had only six employees. Jade now sits on the executive board as Global Head of Human Resources, overseeing 178 employees across ProClinical’s twelve international offices.With a background in visual merchandising, Jade says she “barely knew what an invoice was” when she assumed her first office-based role at ProClinical! Over the following years, Jade began to shape her career, moving into office management within her first year, expanding into compliance and finance before realising her true talent and passion lay in HR. In 2014, she went on maternity leave following the birth of her first son and studied Human Resource Management (CIPD), returning as the company’s HR Manager. Jade grew the HR function to support the company’s rapid growth internationally, and was promoted to Global Head of HR in early 2018. Jade is an inspiration to many women at ProClinical, having transformed her career to pursue her passion while taking time to enjoy being a mum to her two young sons. Here are her insights into what’s been the key to her success at ProClinical:What drew you to a career in HR?I have always dealt with HR aspects throughout my time at ProClinical and when I looked at the many hats I had worn for the business, HR was the one I had the most passion for. I get a real sense of purpose when I know I have helped solve someone’s problem, both from a personal and professional perspective. I found time to study during my first period of maternity leave, which enabled me to progress fully into Human Resources. Has your progression here taken you beyond your original career aspirations?ProClinical is a company that naturally encourages progression, at all levels. At times where I didn’t have much self-belief, there was always someone in the background here encouraging me to strive for more.  I have had the support of ProClinical’s leadership team since I joined the company and that has continued throughout my career. The journey from a shy girl who didn’t know how to make coffee to a confident woman on ProClinical’s executive board has been challenging but definitely reached beyond my expectations!  What would you put your success down to?I have worked since I was 13 years old and I have always had strong work ethic, no matter which role I have been in. I don’t dwell on negatives for too long which helps me maintain a positive outlook. I have also found that having a reliable nature and being able to find creative solutions has helped me excel, particularly within human resources. I am where I am today because I always strive to better myself for my two children, and want to inspire them to do the same.  What inspiring women have you met in the recruitment industry?I work with extremely intelligent, empowering and successful women every day at ProClinical, who inspire me to be the best version of myself.  Recruitment demands hard work and perseverance, and I really admire women who seek to drive innovation and are happy to have challenging conversations that support change in how a business recruits and supports females transitioning throughout the workforce. In general, I admire both men and women in recruitment who are genuine, authentic, and demonstrate an ability to learn, grow and evolve the industry for the better. What would you say to women looking to succeed in a corporate environment?Believe in yourself. It may not be easy to stand up and express your thoughts and opinions but you’ll be amazed at how empowering, and important it can be. Nothing can prepare you for what might happen, but ensuring you are confident in the way that you deal with situations will get you far. What qualities do you think are important to success?There are many qualities people need to succeed, but I have personally found that two stick out as most important in my experience. 1) Be decisive: people who sit on the fence are not appreciated! 2) Maintain personal and professional integrity: a successful person conducts themselves in a respectable manner and always acts fairly and responsibly. How have you found juggling being a mum whilst continuously growing your career?I have been on maternity leave twice in the past five years and each time I was fully supported by ProClinical, whilst on maternity leave and on my return to work.  Even when I was away I still felt connected to the business, so although it was slightly nerve-wracking returning, after the first day back it was like I never left. Having children has made me feel proud that I can juggle career growth whilst enjoying time with my kids. Being a mum and working full time can be very tough at times, which I don’t think anyone would dispute. However, finding a career you’re passionate about makes it that little bit easier and the rewards by far outweigh the tougher days. Do you have any advice for other working mothers?You can only achieve what you can achieve. Don’t be too hard on yourself - you will get there, even if it takes that little bit longer.  The time I have spent with my little ones by far outweighs anything I have ever achieved professionally. Mostly, remember not to lose faith in yourself. Just because you have taken time out to raise a child, you are still as capable as you were before and when you do return, always strive to be a better version of yourself.ProClinical is delighted to celebrate Jade’s achievements and the many other talented, successful women employed by the company globally. We look forward to seeing our female employees grow in confidence, work together and support each other as they pursue their careers at ProClinical - where the sky is the limit.  If you're a woman in the recruitment industry seeking to join a company that will fully support your career aspirations, consider applying to work for ProClinical. We have a range of junior and senior recruitment consultant jobs available, as well as management and director level positions. Apply today to give your career a boost! <!--[endif]--> <!--[if !supportAnnotations]--> <!--[endif]--><!--[if !supportAnnotations]--><!--[endif]--> <!--[if !supportAnnotations]--> <!--[endif]-->

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