tolaini test

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Contract, Analyst, General Management, Project Management, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

North Chicago, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Contract Analytics Project Manager for a biopharmaceutical company located in North Chicago, IL.

Reference:

AC.NR.27522

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Biological Sciences, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Philadelphia, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Senior Scientist of Microbiology for a medical device company located in Philadelphia, PA.

Reference:

SC.MR.27521

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Data Management, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Data Manager for a CRO located remotely.

Reference:

SS.FH.27511

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Data Management, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Annapolis Junction, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Data Management Expert of Early Clinical Development for a pharmaceutical company located in Annapolis, MD

Reference:

SS.FH.27509

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Medical Writing, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Horsham, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Jr. Medical Abstract Writer for our client located in Horsham, PA.

Reference:

MC.SR.27502

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Senior/Director & VP, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Hammonton, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for an SVP of Regulatory Affairs for a pharmaceutical company located in Hammonton, NJ.

Reference:

RA.NW.27500

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Bioprocessing, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Senior Research Investor for a pharmaceutical company located in Cambridge, MA.

Reference:

SC.MR.26494

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Program Manager / Director, VP/Head of Clinical Operations, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Boston, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for an Associate Director of Clinical Operations for a biotechnology company located in Boston, MA.

Reference:

CR.MT.27498

Salary:

Up to £65000.00 per annum

Options Contract Research Organisation (CRO), Permanent, Statistics, United Kingdom, Sales, Mid-Senior Level
Location:

Cambridge, England

Description

A leading Contract Research Organisation (CRO) is currently recruiting a Team Leader of SAS Programming, and the role can be office based or home-based in the UK.

Reference:

SS.EA.27470

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Contract, Analyst, Finance, United States, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

North Chicago, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Senior Financial Analyst for a biopharmaceutical company located in North Chicago, IL.

Reference:

AC.AR.27494

Proclinical open new office in Culver City, Los Angeles, CA

Proclinical expands West Coast presence to meet demand of LA’s booming biotechs

Los Angeles, January 20, 2020Proclinical’s rapid growth in the US continues to gain momentum as the life sciences staffing and consulting provider announced the opening of their newest offices in Los Angeles, CA this week. The new Proclinical office – located in Culver City, close to Venice Beach – will serve as a base to focus on growing biotech demand in California, perfectly complimenting their existing medtech-focused team in the San Francisco Bay area. Since first entering the US in 2016, UK-founded Proclinical has now put boots on the ground in 6 locations across America. Proclinical Director, Jimmy Mooney, based at the new office said, “Proclinical see’s Los Angeles as an emerging biotech hub, with state, institutional and private investment coming in. LA is poised to become the fastest growing biotech hub in the state. With incubators like BioLa and LA Biosciences Hub recently launched, Los Angeles will see continued growth and Proclinical is in a great position to contribute.”   As the world’s fifth largest economy, The Golden State already boasts two substantial biotech hubs – in the San Francisco Bay Area and San Diego – and the emergence of Los Angeles County as a third was recently identified by Biocom’s 2019 Economic Impact Report Databook. According to the report, last year all sectors of the life science industry generated $42.5 billion in economic activity and adds $23.5 billion to the county's gross profit. In the region, there are approximately 92,000 related jobs with an average earning of $83,000. Those jobs also support almost 191,000 peripheral jobs in the region, the data shows. About ProclinicalAs Global Growth Partners, Proclinical provides a unique proposition; delivering on every stage of the life science process to help individuals, teams and whole organizations reach their goals faster.Through our suite of services – Proclinical Staffing, Proclinical Executive, Proclinical Consulting and Proclinical Engage – we help you to grow so that you can bring about a positive impact on global health.

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The most significant FDA approvals of the decade 2010-2019

The most significant FDA approvals of the decade (2010-2019)

From innovative leaps in cancer diagnosis and treatment to the growing force of artificial intelligence in aiding medical discovery, the 2010s was a ground-breaking decade for the life science industry. We have seen the steady rise of targeted and personalised medicines, and advancements in genetic engineering have thrown up controversial yet undeniably ground-breaking potential that could completely change the way we diagnose and treat disease in the future. To bring these incredible drug breakthroughs to US patients, the Food & Drug Association (FDA) approved a significant number of innovative drugs and therapies between 2010-2019. 2017 was a record-breaking year – with the FDA approving 55 drugs, and in 2019, there was still an impressive 48 innovative medicines approved.  Many of these medicines were approved by other industry bodies elsewhere in the world, such as the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and China’s National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) increasing the accessibility of these new, life saving treatments to patients globally. The last decade has been truly outstanding for medical innovation and discovery. Below are some of the most significant FDA approvals of the 2010s, within the context of the top 5 biggest areas of medical advancement. Gene therapyGene therapy is a type of treatment that works by replacing damaged, defective or missing genes that cause disease in a patient, with normal healthy genes. Latest advancements in this area include the highly controversial CRISPR technology, which could give us the power to fully manipulate a person’s DNA to eradicate disease. The FDA have made a number of gene therapy approvals over the last decade, bringing hope to patients suffering with a variety of very serious conditions like cancer and genetic disease. Gene therapy treatments are an excellent example of the move towards personalised medicine, as these drugs are individually tailored to each patient. Some of the most important gene therapies approved by the FDA this decade include Kymriah (developed by Novartis in 2018) and Yescarta (developed by Kite Pharma in 2017) which both treat different types of lymphoma, as well as Luxturna in 2017 – Spark Therapeutics’ therapy to treat an inherited eye disease called IRD which caused blindness.  ImmunotherapyThe concept of immunotherapy is not new, dating back to the late 1800s when physicians attempted to stimulate a person’s natural immune system to fight disease. However, in the last ten years, immunotherapy has transformed into a complex technology with untold potential to treat a range of life-threatening diseases. It has been particularly ground-breaking in cancer, completely changing the landscape of how to treat the disease for years to come. The technology is also helping researchers understand more about the mechanics of the disease, which may lead to an eventual cancer cure. The first break-through immunotherapy approved by the FDA was Provenge in 2010, a cancer vaccine that was proven to effectively treat multiple cancers, from melanoma and lymphoma to lung and liver cancers. As the technology become more advanced, various other FDA approvals followed, including Opdivo in 2014, Keytruda for multiple types of cancer in 2016 and Tecentriq for lung cancer in 2019.  Rare DiseasesRare diseases, also referred to as orphan diseases, are a group of around 7,000 known diseases that affect a small percentage of the population, usually 1 in 200,000. However, in the USA, rare disease is not so rare when grouped together – affecting as many as 1 in 10 Americans. Therefore, the steady increase in FDA approvals for rare disease drugs over the last decade has been a significant achievement. Most notably, the emergence of RNA interference technology, has been a real breakthrough in the area of rare disease. It works by providing new DNA to cells which modifies them to treat the disease. The FDA approved the first-of-its kind RNAi therapy – Onpattro – in 2018 to treat peripherial nerve disease which is caused by a rare disease called hereditary transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR). This promising treatment could be used in future to treat other devastating rare diseases such as Huntington’s disease.Outside of RNAi, the FDA has approved some other milestone drugs to treat rare disease. These include Crysvita in 2018, to treat a genetic bone disease called X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), and Galafold which helps patients suffering from Fabry disease, a rare disease that affects the kidneys, heart and nervous system.  HIVAt the end of the 2000s, there had certainly been significant improvements in the treatment of HIV, with the life expectancy of patients increasing from 2-3 years in the 1990s to several decades by 2010. In the years since then, HIV treatment has made even bigger strides in prolonging and improving the lives of HIV patients globally. FDA approvals for the treatment of HIV have accelerated in the last five years in particular, with a ground-breaking 9 drugs approved in 2018 alone – out of the total 29 drugs approved since the early 1980s. Out of these many approvals this decade, several stand out. In 2018, the FDA approved the first single-tablet treatment for HIV – Gilead’s Biktarvy, which proved much more manageable than the standard cocktail of drugs patients would take every day. Merck’s Doravirine, also approved in 2018, is a highly effective combination therapy that showed higher tolerance in patients than older HIV drugs. In 2019, the FDA approved another two HIV drugs by Merck – Delstrigo and Pifeltro that are thought to be the most effective three-drug, single-tablet regimen available to HIV patients who have not had any previous treatment.  Although originally approved in 2004 as a treatment for people who are already infected, the approval of Gilead's Truvada in 2012 as a prophylactic carried much greater significance since it can now be used by individuals at high risk as a precautionary measure to stop them from contracting the virus. Although there is still no cure for HIV, the ability to extend patients’ lives by several decades and enable them to live with fewer and fewer side effects of both the disease and its medication is proving to be one of the greatest accomplishments of the decade. Neurology Neurology is one of the most complex areas of science, with researchers still having very limited understanding of how the human brain works, least of all the mechanics the many diseases that affect it. However, in the last decade, the life science industry has made important steps in understanding and treating some of the most devastating neurological diseases that affect millions globally. These include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis and motor neuron disease (MND) also known as ALS. While there have certainly been fewer quick fixes or cures in this elusive field, the mere ability to alleviate symptoms and slow down the progression of neurodegenerative disease has been ground-breaking. The most significant FDA approvals for neurological disease this decade include Xadago (2017) to treats Parkinson’s patients who have stopped responding to Levodopa, the leading treatment since the 1960s. Multiple sclerosis (MS), a common neurodegenerative disease, had it’s first FDA approval for the primary progressive strain of the disease in 2017 with Ocrevus, which also improved the symptoms of other MS patients. Perhaps among the most devastating of neurodegenerative diseases – MND/ALS – had a real break-through moment in 2017 was the development of Radicava, the only approved drug available to patients today. The long-awaited FDA approval of Radicava gave patients the chance to slow the progression of the disease and improve their ability to carry out day-to-day tasks such as eating and speaking.  As we enter yet another decade, we can look forward to the untold potential of exciting medical technologies such as artificial intelligence, genetic engineering and immunotherapy, as well as continuing to see advancements in growing therapeutics areas such as neurology, antibiotic resistance and HIV. 

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Understanding IR35 2020 - Guidebook Life Sciences

Guidebook: Understanding UK Off-Payroll Working Rules - IR35

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IR35 Changes 2020 - impact on the life science industry

IR35 changes 2020: How does it impact UK life science businesses?

The UK’s off-payroll working rules (known as IR35) were updated across the public sector in 2017 and these changes are scheduled to be extended to all private sector businesses from April 2020. This has left many of the country’s life science organisations – as well as those from other industries – feeling concerned about the potential costs they will face, both financially and in terms of what this will mean for their contract workforce.  In reality, as long as the most recent IR35 rules are well-understood and complied with, genuine contractors and their clients will not be penalised by the legislation. This article aims to address concerns surrounding IR35 and help UK life science companies assess if they will be affected by the 2020 IR35 reforms, and how it may impact the business.To help you gain a better understanding of the off-payroll working rules, Proclinical has developed a guidebook packed full of research and insight that will help you understand the legislation changes and how you should prepare for them.What is IR35?In 2000, HM Revenue and Customs’ (HMRC) implemented IR35 legislation in an effort to ensure fairness in tax and National Insurance contributions between individuals who work in a similar way. IR35 is a piece of anti-avoidance tax legislation that is designed to assess whether a contingent worker (contractor, freelancer or consultant) engaged by a client is genuinely an independent worker or the company’s ‘disguised employee’. In the case of a ‘disguised employee’, the contractor is for all intents and purposes behaving as an employee but enjoying tax efficiency by claiming pay through an intermediary, known as the contractor’s Personal Services Company (PSC). This is often a limited company. Simply put – would the contractor be an employee if the intermediary did not exist?The legislation has changed over the years notably in 2017 with its new interpretation for the Public sector and now it’s planned changes for April 2020.Who does IR35 apply to?In the life science industry, IR35 rules apply to both contingent worker – commonly referred to as a contractor – and the life science company that engages them – known as the ‘end hirer’. It will also affect intermediary fee payers – normally an agency – who will make the necessary deductions and declarations prior to paying the contractor. When does IR35 come into effect?The updated IR35 legislation that was announced in 2019, is currently planned to come into effect on 6th April 2020. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'ce23151f-48ef-4321-81ce-89c4efd24ca6', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> How does IR35 work?Contractors and organisations will only be affected by IR35 if they fall within predefined conditions of employment that signal that they are acting as a regular employee, rather than an independent worker. IR35 legislation is, therefore, put in place to stop contractors avoiding paying certain tax liabilities.What does inside or outside IR35 mean?If a contractor is ‘inside IR35’ this means that, according to the HMRC, they are a ‘deemed employee’ and behave much like a regular employee. In this case, the client will be responsible for deducting the relevant income tax and NICs for HMRC on behalf of the contractor, prior to paying them their fee. This is also commonly known as being ‘caught by IR35’.  If a contractor is ‘outside IR35’ then they have been proven a genuine contractor that is providing a service to a life science company. In this instance, the end hirer will not have to deduct any additional taxes. What are the major IR35 reforms in 2020?The 2020 IR35 legislation reforms will mean changes for both parties, but there are some significant implications that will particularly affect the ‘end hirer’. Below is a brief summary that will most impact life science companies: The responsibility for determining whether a contractor is inside or outside of IR35 will now fall to the ‘end hirer’ rather than the contractor themselves The ‘end hirer’ must take action to assess the contractor’s employment status  Both medium and large companies are now required to assess their contractors’ employment status The ‘end hirer’ must implement a ‘client led disagreement’ so that contractors can review their employment status if they think the determination is incorrect The ‘end hirer’ will be liable to pay any unpaid taxes or fines if they do not: Make a determination and therefore, do not pass it to the fee payerUse reasonable care in determining the contractor’s employment statusProcess payment according to the ‘end hire’ determination How much will IR35 cost UK life science businesses?According to HMRC, one-off costs could include familiarisation with the changes, upskilling staff in making status determinations and determining whether the rules apply to their existing off-payroll engagements. Ongoing costs could include making status determinations for any new off-payroll engagements and maintaining a status disagreement process for off-payroll workers who seek to challenge their status determination.There may be further costs to businesses whose contract workers are deemed inside IR35. These will vary significantly from one business to the next and depend on how they, and their individual contractors, choose to operate going forward. Their workers, who have to pay additional tax, could find they have less take-home pay and may seek an uplift or consider other options.How do life science organisations determine who is inside or outside IR35?Organisations using contract workers may determine whether a contractor is inside or outside IR35 by using the below guidance provided by the HMRC, however they are not always clear in every instance. Our downloadable IR35 guidebook is designed to help companies with clarification around these rules and provides examples of real-life legal cases where determinations by HMRC have been successfully challenged, setting a precedent that will help guide you in your decision making. The indicators used to identify workers inside scope are: Supervision, direction, control: This test helps determine whether a contractor is inside or outside IR35 by finding out how much supervision and control the life science company has over the contractor. For example, if there are mandatory hours of work, or considerable control over where and how the work is carried out. This usually indicates that the contractor is inside IR35.Mutuality of obligation (MOO):Mutuality of obligation is when a life science company is obliged to offer work to a contractor, and the contractor is obliged to accept the work.Substitution:If another contractor or interim worker cannot be substituted in to carry out the work, then the original contractor is likely to be within IR35‘Part and parcel’:A contractor will likely be considered inside IR35 if there is evidence that they are a fixture within the life science company’s structure. An indicator of this is if the contractor has people within the business reporting to themProvision of equipment:Another way to be potentially ‘caught’ by IR35 is if the life science company provides the contractor with the tools, provisions or equipment they need to carry out the work.Exclusivity:If the contractor is only working for one company instead of with multiple clients as self-employed workers usually do, then this could suggest that they are behaving like an employee.How can I find out if IR35 applies to contract workers in my business?HMRC provides a means to help companies determine whether their contractor workers are caught by IR35 – the Check Employment Status for Tax (CEST) tool. However, there has been much controversy over the CEST tool’s accuracy. Critics claim that it fails to take into account some significant factors needed to determine a contractor’s correct employment status. This has led to thousands of contractors being incorrectly ‘caught’ by IR35 and paying unnecessary and often hefty fees.How can Proclinical help life science companies comply with the 2020 IR35 requirements?If you feel your life sciences business needs more help in understanding IR35 and how to get ready for the changes, we recommend reading our guidebook: Understanding UK Off-Payroll Working Rules – IR35. The Proclinical team will be further supporting businesses in the run-up to the changes through events and consultations. If this is something you would be interested in attending, you can sign up to our mailing list to ensure you receive announcements. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'ce23151f-48ef-4321-81ce-89c4efd24ca6', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Who are the top 10 medical device companies to work for according to Glassdoor?

1011 Talented professionals in the medical devices industry are increasingly selective about what companies they choose to work for. For those who want to find out where the best places to work are, review sites like Glassdoor can help to paint a picture of the employee experience. Ratings from current and former employees can enable anyone to explore the workplace culture, flexibility, leadership style and work/life balance, before making a decision to apply or accept a job offer.According to one survey, nearly 50% of job-seekers use Glassdoor to research potential employers before making a decision to work for them. The platform asks reviewers to give a 1 to 5-star rating of their employers in the following categories: culture and values, work/life balance, senior management, compensation and benefits, and career opportunities. The average of these individual ratings then provides an overall rating.To discover the best-rated employers, we used Glassdoor’s review platform to compile a list of the top medical device companies to work for according to their overall rating. In the case of medical device companies with the same overall rating, the percentage of employees who would ‘Recommend a Friend’ is used to differentiate them.To ensure that true experiences and opinions of employees are properly reflected in the company’s rating, we have only included companies that have over 400 employee reviews. 10. ALCONGlassdoor rating: 3.6Alcon is a global leader in developing innovative eye care products. In April 2019, the company broke away from its parent company Novartis, and continues to thrive helping patients in over 140 countries globally. According to Glassdoor, Alcon scored highly in compensation and benefits, and culture and values suggesting that not only can professionals expect fair wages and a good benefits package, but a company culture they can get on board with.This is no wonder, as a recent Glassdoor survey suggests that 48% of job seekers in the US listed attractive benefits and perks as the prime factor that encouraged them to apply for a job, and 35% were drawn to a great company culture! 9. MEDTRONICGlassdoor rating: 3.6Currently the top medical device company in the world, MedTronic is also a favourite among employees as a great place to work. The company specialises in developing medical devices across multiple therapeutic areas such as cardiology, respiratory, surgical and diabetes for more than 46,000 patients worldwide. Their Glassdoor rating indicates that MedTronic shine in the areas of compensation and benefits, culture and values, and work/life balance. Further still, 70% of employees who left a review would recommend the company to a friend as a good place to work.MedTronic has a number of employer awards that solidify its standing as a top medical device company to work for. The most recent of which include Best Employer for Diversity by Forbes (2018) and Best Places to Work for LGBT Equality by Corporate Equality Index (2018). 8. GE HEALTHCAREGlassdoor rating: 3.6A thriving subsidiary of General Electric, GE Healthcare is 5th on Proclinical’s top 10 medical device companies in 2019. The company works in the precision healthcare space, developing innovative medical devices and diagnostics such as medical imaging and data analytics. GE Healthcare is also highly regarded by past and present employees as one of the best medical device companies to work for. The company scored equally well in culture and values, work/life balance and compensation and benefits, suggesting an attractive combination of a good benefits package and a great working environment. Just this year, GE Healthcare was listed on LinkedIn’s Top Companies 2019: ‘Where the US wants to work now’. 7. HOLOGICGlassdoor rating: 3.7Hologic is a medical device company that focuses on improving women’s health by developing devices that better detect, diagnose and treat diseases that commonly affect them. According to their Glassdoor profile, they are also an employer of choice. Hologic scored the highest in work/life balance, followed closely by culture and values and compensation and benefits. It seems that professionals looking for medical device jobs at Hologic can expect to be both well compensated and enjoy a good balance of life inside and outside of the office.In recent years, Hologic has been recognised by Forbes for various awards, including Forbes 2018 America’s Best Employers for Women and America’s Best Midsized Employers, 2017. The company was also recognised as a Corporate Champion in November 2019 by Women’s Forum of NY for their advancement towards achieving gender-balance in the boardroom. 6. VARIAN MEDICAL SYSTEMSGlassdoor rating: 3.7Dedicated to creating a world without fear of cancer, Varian Medical Systems develops medical devices in the radiotherapy and radiosurgery space. The company is quickly growing, already boasting a staff of 6,500 people worldwide. Varian Medical Systems is also one of the best medical device companies to work for according to its Glassdoor profile. The medical device company scored very highly in the culture and values category, followed closely by work/life balance suggesting a healthy environment for professionals to thrive in. This is most likely the case as an impressive 82% of employees who left a review would recommend the company to a friend. 5. PHILIPS HEALTHCAREGlassdoor rating: 3.8Philips Healthcare is number 5 on the list of best medical device companies to work for. A subsidiary of the multinational electronics conglomerate Philips, the company also ranks in the top 5 of our top 10 medical device companies in 2019. Not only is the company thriving, but it is well liked by its employees, over five thousand of which have left reviews on Glassdoor. According to their ratings, Philips Healthcare came up trumps for work/life balance and compensation and benefits, showing a dedication to treating their workforce well. 4. DEPUY SYNTHESGlassdoor rating: 3.8Another successful medical device subsidiary, DePuy Synthes, is part of global leading pharmaceutical, biotechnology and consumer goods company Johnson & Johnson. DePuy Synthes is a leader in developing orthopaedic and neurology devices for thousands of patients worldwide. Receiving a 4-star rating in the category of compensation and benefits on Glassdoor, it’s clear that medical device jobs come with a competitive package. DePuy Synthes also scored highly in culture and values, as well as for career opportunities, providing a dynamic working environment in which professionals can develop their careers. 75% of DePuy Synthes reviewers claimed they would recommend their place of work to a friend. 3. STRYKERGlassdoor rating: 3.9Stryker is a leading medical device company that specialises in creating innovative devices in the areas of orthopaedics, surgical, spinal and neurotechnology. Glassdoor reveals Stryker as one of the top 3 medical device companies to work for following its strong performance across several categories. The company ranks very highly in culture and values, career opportunities and compensation and benefits, with 75% of reviewers stating that they would recommend Stryker as a place to work to a friend.Stryker has an impressive track record of employer awards and accolades. In 2019 alone the company was recognised as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work For by Fortune, among the Best Workplaces for Remote Work by Flexjobs, and featured in the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s Index for LGBTQ Workplace Equality. 2. SIEMENS HEATHINEERS Glassdoor rating: 3.9As a thriving segment of the Siemen’s powerhouse, Siemens Healthineers is a popular choice for professionals looking for the best medical device jobs and is the second highest rated medical device employer on Glassdoor. According to the review site, Siemens scored highly in the work/life balance category, as well as for compensation and benefits and culture and values. Further still, nearly 80% of reviewers were likely to recommend Siemens Healthineers as a place to work to a friend.For three years’ running, the company has earned high rankings on the Human Rights Campaign Corporate Equality Index, as well as having been recognised as Military friendly and a company committed to recruiting veterans. 1. BOSTON SCIENTIFIC Glassdoor rating: 4.0Boston Scientific employees rate their employer as the best in the medical device industry according to Glassdoor. The company operates in over 130 countries worldwide, developing cutting edge devices for patients with health conditions spanning a wide range of therapy areas. Boston Scientific is also most popular employer according to employee ratings on Glassdoor. The medical device company ranked highly across all categories, but it’s rating for culture and values, and compensation and benefits really stood out. A whopping 84% of employees stated that they would recommend Boston Scientific to a friend and 98% approve of the company’s CEO, Michael F. Mahoney.The company has earned a number of employer awards, but have been recognised principally for their dedication to diversity and inclusion in the workplace. In the last few years alone, they have received recognition for their efforts to further gender equality, LGBTQ equality and multiculturalism. Proclinical is a consulting and staffing company within the life science space and has worked alongside many of the top medical device companies listed here. If you are seeking medical device jobs at a leading medical device company, get in touch today by uploading your CV/resume or searching for our latest medical device opportunities.

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Proclinical collect the APSCo award for Recruitment Company with the Most Sustainable Growth 2019

Proclinical Staffing retains title as “Recruitment Company with the Most Sustainable Growth”

London, 16th October 2019 – Proclinical Staffing cemented its credentials for growth last week as the life science recruiter was once again named “Recruitment Company with the Most Sustainable Growth”. The title was awarded by the Association of Professional Staffing Companies (APSCo) at their London ceremony, which took place on Wednesday 8th October.   For Proclinical – whose tagline ‘Global Growth Partners’ reflects their proposition to their client-base – this was an impressive retention of the award they won in 2018, which followed a special commendation given by the APSCo judges for the same category in 2017. In total, this marks the 5th APSCo Award Proclinical has scooped in the past 4 years. In that time its turnover has increased from £20M to £57M and headcount has more than doubled to over 200 employees in 9 countries.  In 2019 alone, the life science specialists have opened a second office in China and added new sites in Japan, India, Sweden, and Germany.   Attending the Awards Ceremony, Daniel Jones, Proclinical’s Global Managing Director, said “We are honoured and very grateful to APSCo to receive this accolade for the second year in succession. Their standard is very high, and this particular award carries an added layer of prestige because it commends both our performance and our trajectory. To keep hold of this award is particularly satisfying and is a testament to the way we do business – by focussing on long-term partnerships. These are exciting times at Proclinical and the character shown by the whole team has been tremendous in the way they’ve performed and seamlessly adapted as we’ve continued to scale up and gone through our recent acquisition by Independent Clinical Services (ICS). We couldn’t have hoped for better backers than ICS, whose shared values and investment enable us to continue meeting demand in new markets and diversify the range of services we are able to provide to the sciences industry.”  APSCo is a leading recruitment industry body that celebrates its 20th year in business this year. It holds its Annual Awards for Excellence to recognise professional standards and all-round performance across the staffing sector. These Awards are considered the most prestigious accolade in professional recruitment, acting as a unique indicator of professional standards. The Award for Recruitment Company with the Most Sustainable Growth is awarded to the company that has shown consistent growth over the past 5 years whilst demonstrating the professional values and exceptional performance associated with APSCo membership.  About Proclinical  Proclinical offers an extensive suite of solutions – Proclinical Staffing, Proclinical Executive, Proclinical Consulting and Proclinical Engage – to help good life science partners grow. By forming long-term partnerships with individuals, teams, and whole organisations, we can provide support at every stage of the life science progress so that they can bring about a positive impact on global health. 

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Proclinical host a panel discussion with senior HR leaders

(VIDEO) Growing Your Life Science Business in a Talent-Short Market

   When critical positions in any life sciences organisation remain vacant, innovation can be severely impacted. This is a reality that many employers across the industry face right now. Keeping up with an ever-changing landscape, where experts in certain areas can be few and far between is a challenge for many and this is significantly amplified when the business is undergoing rapid growth. What can managers and talent acquisition teams do to address the challenges of a talent-short market? Proclinical were joined at the 2019 LEAP HR Life Sciences Conference in Boston, Massachusetts by an expert panel with a wealth of knowledge and experience in tackling these challenges: Nicole Barna (VP Head of Human Resources, Codiak Biosciences), Donna Vieraitis (Head of Human Resources, Servier Pharmaceuticals) and Carolyn Pastore (Director, Talent Acquisition and Human Resources, Blueprint Medicines). Watch the video of our discussion on how life science companies can overcome internal and external challenges to expand their businesses internationally. Our panellists address the daily challenges that HR and talent acquisition teams face, such as how to differentiate your organisation against others competing for the same individuals, their key considerations for entering international markets and ways to engage internal stakeholders to align processes, culture and values. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'b067d5a2-f614-49b3-add3-d906762f610a', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Proclinical unveils momentous re-brand to represent its diverse suite of services

London, Thursday 8th August, 2019 Last week, life science specialist HR and consulting services provider, Proclinical, unveiled its bold new look to employees and partners globally. The company’s new identity, featuring a colourful suite of endorsed offer brands, is a result of many years’ growth and a quickly evolving range of services that had previously been underrepresented.   Better known for its rapidly expanding recruitment offering across the US, Europe and Asia-Pacific regions, in recent years Proclinical has been diversifying its range of services to include end-to-end consulting, project management and executive search. This has enabled them to better serve the increasing demand from companies in the growing industries of biotechnology, MedTech and medical devices across the globe.   These momentous changes led the life science specialists to embark on a journey to reassess and rejuvenate its core identity and purpose to align with its present and future. The company’s suite of services are now identified as distinct sub-brands; Proclinical Staffing and Proclinical Executive still represent the company’s well-established recruitment business, while emerging sub-brands Proclinical Engage and Proclinical Consulting mark its dedication to providing more in-depth, comprehensive solutions to some of their life science partners’ biggest challenges.   To represent its complete offering to life science companies globally, the Proclinical Group purpose now proudly states: To help good life science partners grow.   Proclinical’s Head of Marketing, Peter Hogg, explained, “The challenge was in containing our full business offering within a cohesive brand structure and articulating a clear message both internally and externally about who we are and what we do. Before entering the next stage of our growth, we felt that this required us to redefine our purpose, our proposition, our values and our brand architecture.   Whether we are consulting on a product launch, staffing a new international manufacturing facility or helping an individual to take the next step in their career, growth is the essence of why we do what we do, and partnerships embodies the way we do it – through focusing on long-term, collaborative relationships, based on expertise and understanding. It also highlights our position as enablers - dedicated to helping our partners work more efficiently so they have more space to grow, innovate and save lives.  The use of the word good is very deliberate and adds an ethical note to Proclinical’s positioning that has always been there but was never truly celebrated. It nods to the company’s commitment to be selective about partnering only with companies who we consider to be good employers, with good products and a good reputation.”  Proclinical has created a re-brand overview illustrating their journey as well as a more detailed look into each of the individual sub-brands.   About Proclinical  Proclinical helps to fuel the growth of the life sciences industry globally. Their staffing and consulting partnerships enable good companies to work better, so they can innovate and change lives. Proclinical offers their life science partners a range of services including strategic project management, executive search and specialist recruitment.  

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3 steps to an effective job hunt in the life science industry

Only 5% of applicants are called in for an interview, a recent study suggests. Finding the job you want in the life science industry can be tricky, thanks to very competitive landscape. There are three main stages of finding a job - preparing, applying for and securing the job.At Proclinical we live and breathe the process of job searching. We are truly experts at what to do, what not to do, and have picked up many tips on how the best professionals carry out a successful job hunt. Have a look at each section to see how you can maximise your chances of getting the job you want.1. Research and preparationThis stage is mostly about ensuring that you are putting your best foot forward from the beginning. Life science jobs are competitive and you’ll have to beat out a lot of other experienced candidates in the early stages of your application.UpdateBe sure to fully update your most recent experience any new skills you have gained in your current role. Taking time to showcase your key attributes helps busy HR personnel and hiring managers see immediately to what extent you are qualified for the job. This is a huge advantage as they are likely to skim read your CV/resume and if important information is not present or easily seen, this will affect your chances of getting an interview.  Customise For highly specialist roles, of which there are so many in life sciences, there is nothing worse than a generic CV or resume. Each company is unique, working with different materials and technologies in various therapeutic areas. HR and hiring managers will want to see very specific examples of how your skills and experience will advance the technologies, specialisms and processes that drive their company. Filtering out irrelevant skills and experiences will streamline your CV and ensure you look like the ideal person for the job.Optimise In this instance, we mean optimizing your application for the various technologies that it may pass through. Most likely an ATS system. These highly efficient systems will scan through your CV/resume looking for pre-programmed key words and phrases that match the job description in question. If these keywords, phrases and acronyms aren’t written in a recognisable way you risk your key skills and experience not registering with the ATS, sending your application to the bottom of the pile. Over half of candidates are eliminated for a job via the ATS system if they don’t match the job description.Here are a few common CV/resume writing mistakes to avoid!Review your online presence:So much of the job hunting process happens online. That’s why it’s crucial to make sure that you are presenting yourself well on both job searching AND social media platforms. You can count on prospective employers googling you once they receive your job application or just before they reach out to you. Would you be happy with what comes up on your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc.? Either keep these social feeds free from appropriate pictures, a lot of bad language and ravings over sensitive subjects or take time to make them private! 70% of employers say that they turned down candidates because they discovered something negative or inappropriate online.LinkedInSometimes the best job come to you. Recruiters or a company’s talent acquisition may conduct their own searches and approach you with an opportunity. This saves you a lot of hassle of trolling through job sites/boards and almost guarantees you an interview. However, only the best candidates are approached like this. Aside from updating and optimising their CV, these professionals have taken care in creating and maintaining professional profiles. This could be their profile on a job board, or more likely - on LinkedIn.LinkedIn is a great way to broadcast the best bits of your CV/resume in a fully optimised profile that can be seen by an array of recruiters and employers. Around 95% of recruiters use social media to advertise job opportunities, and 70% of employers are using social networks to screen potential hires.2. Applying for jobsAre you looking in the right places?Job boardsAside from the major job boards like Indeed, Glassdoor and Monster there are a number of life science specific job boards that you may have come across. Some of the most prominent life science job boards include PharmiWeb, CareerBuilder, New Scientist, Emed and Biospace, and you’ll find a great deal of opportunities here. However, to refine your job search even more, you can seek out job boards that are specific to your field or specialism.Applying directlyIt is thought that as many as 80% of jobs are not posted on industry job boards or social media. Therefore, you may gain advantage by making a list of companies you want to work for and apply directly via their website.NetworkingBetter yet, do some homework and work out who the key decision makers or hiring managers are in your field within your ideal company and begin networking with them. LinkedIn is a great tool for network - another good reason to set up a profile. Generally, networking adds another string to your bow when searching for jobs that may not be publicly advertised. Here’s some top tips on how to network for jobs in the life science industry.RecruitmentA proportion of jobs not advertised online will be assigned to recruitment and staffing companies to help companies find the specialist skills and experience they need. These specialist staffing agencies build up networks of these professionals to call upon when they match the job description. Bear in mind that if you are approached by a recruiter that the job may be exclusively available through their agency so it is certainly worth considering.Finding a job through a recruitment company can also simplify your job hunt significantly and can increase your chances of being put forward for an interview. We’ve outlined a few reasons why you should consider using a specialist life science recruitment agency to enhance your job search.  3. Getting the jobOnce you’ve successfully made the 5% invited for an interview, it’s your chance to convince them you’re the best candidate. To actually get a job takes so much more than having the right qualifications and experience, and meeting your prospective employers in person is the opportunity to showcase everything else you can bring to the role.We could reel off a long list of what not to do in a life science interview but instead we’ve got some key points on what to expect, how to prepare and some important things to remember during the interview.Preparation is kingPreparation should go beyond researching the company’s history and products. Spend time understanding their unique medicines, technologies, indications and therapies and what drives them to save and improve patients’ lives. It’s important to remember that this sense of purpose is an important part of what fuels the life science industry.To show an even wider understanding, be sure to research the current market (whether pharma, biotech, medical devices etc.). Try to identify trends and forces that may be influencing or causing changes in the market.Also, give the impression of being prepared by bringing along a copy of your CV/resume, a notepad to make notes, and even a few of your own pre-written notes to refer to during the interview. This may strike you as strange, but an interview is not an exam. Having some key points written down or even some questions you wanted to ask is a great way to stay on track and ensure you get all the information you need.Appearance and body languageWhile your interviewer will certainly be looking for well thought out answers to questions, they’re also on the lookout for a professional appearance and composed body language. Some light hearted pleasantries at the beginning of the interview won’t go amiss, adding to the impression that you are calm and collected.Remember not to talk over your interviewers, speak abruptly to any administrative staff before/after the interview and most importantly, avoid speaking about your previous employers in a negative light.Answering questionsYou can never know exactly which questions you are going to be asked, but preparing for common interview questions is a good start. Prepare answers around the specific therapy area or field of science that may be involved in the role you are applying for.Competency-based questions are common so it’s advisable to brush up on some frequently asked questions. It’s worth following the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) framework when preparing potential questions, and also in the moment when you’re answering. A quick note on answering questions you’re not prepared for - try not to get flustered, instead taking a few moments to process and formulate something as relevant as possible. As a general rule, interviewers will appreciate a slight pause because launching into your answer as it shows that you are giving it due consideration instead of reeling off memorised answers.Asking questionsInterviewers will expect you to have a few questions of your own. There is likely a lot information you will want to gather as you are also assessing whether the position is right for you. Asking considered, targeted questions shows you’re interested, engaged and focused on the company and role.Here’s some ideas on questions to ask before, during and after an interview!Going for a management role? Here’s some specific advice if you’re preparing for a management interview.Are you a contractor? For some insight and bunch of tips on interviewing for life science contract positions, download our comprehensive Contractors Interview Guidebook today! <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '2a6fe3dc-c357-4095-b46f-69cb8c58ba43', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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How to spot a great candidate at interview

There’s a unique challenge that comes with hiring a new employee. Often, this position will be time-sensitive, usually in response to resignation or company expansion. The life sciences industry is currently in an exciting, if tumultuous, era of fast expansion, high turnover, and career progression that leaves employers frequently pressured to employ candidates at a much faster rate. However, given the important of the work in the life sciences industry, many employers may not give themselves time to thoroughly screen candidates in their searches for new hires. Whilst it’s important to find a new person quickly, it’s also important to find the right person. Luckily, there are a few ways of quickly and efficiently scouting out candidates during interviews, helping employers go from hiring a ‘good enough’ candidate to a great candidate. Composure Firstly, it’s important to pay attention to each candidate’s behaviour during interviews. This can cover everything from the words and phrases they use, how they hold themselves, to the way they talk to various team members. A calm, confident interviewee will be open without being over familiar – suggesting self-awareness rather than cockiness. Pay particular attention to the questions they ask – a keen mind is a valuable gain as well as an indication to what you can expect of them as they work for you. Anything about your company’s recent awards or events, or how the role might change over the course of the tenure, indicates not only a keen interest in the job, but both that they have prepared for this interview and are showing commitment to the role. It’s equally important to look at how they interact over the course of the interview. Does the conversation stay respectful and formal, or does it devolve into a more casual, ‘matey’ vibe as the meeting goes on? Someone who loses sight of the formality of the situation can be someone who will have trouble respecting authority if they’re hired. The ideal candidate will be friendly and jovial, but without stepping into pre-emptive familiarity. What makes them stand out? During the screening process, you’ll come across many candidates whose CVs look similar. Of course, it’s to be expected that in the life sciences industry, you’ll encounter a lot of graduates from life science degrees who have since gone on to work in life science jobs. However, when faced with multiple versions of the same applicant, how can you figure out which of these candidates will be the stand-out? Look at how they enhance their CV. What additional skills have they got that they can bring to the role? Beyond that, what steps have they taken to improving their already earned experience? Do they keep up to date with current life sciences trends and news? Most importantly, look for results on their CV. If they can prove that they were not only successful in their fields, but what the impact of their success was, they’re a keeper. Alternative experience/transferable skills It’s easy to dismiss candidates who come from non-life science fields, but a closer inspection will show that this injection of a foreign element might be just what your company needs. Whilst we can’t reasonably expect a finance manager to suddenly be able to regulate drugs (though we may be surprised!), we can expect that their experience in an unorthodox role will have transferable benefits to your company. Experience in leading a group or providing information is universal, but the way to go about these experiences can be radically different from field to field. By coming at challenges with a fresh viewpoint, a candidate can provide dynamic and innovative solutions to what otherwise might be a stagnant pool of employees. Cultural fit Cultural fit is often touted as a vital part of the candidate screening process. It’s indisputably important that a company’s employees benefit from having similar values and sets of behaviours, especially in a highly cooperative team environment. However, this has a serious drawback – stagnation. When a team is all pulled from the same pool, it can become very insular and struggle to change or adapt in response to the world around them. The concept of the cultural fit can be a hindrance as much as a benefit. This is where hiring someone outside of the cultural fit can be a real advantage. Diversity in the workforce, across gender, race, background, etc., along with mentality and outlook on the industry, can shakeup an otherwise ‘cookie cutter’ team. Trust your recruitment partner New statistics from Quarsh indicate that over 70% of in-house solutions fail to source all, or even 90% of their vacancies themselves. This staggering number makes sense in the pharmaceutical industry, where many positions require specialist, highly trained professionals to take on the role. By passing on the task of candidate sourcing to recruiters, you can guarantee that the applicants who make it to your interviews are already the best of the best. Trust in these recruiters, who spend their entire days searching for the perfect match for their assigned roles. In many cases, recruiters will retain CVs that stood out, but weren’t right for other roles, that will be a perfect match for your position. Proclinical is a specialist life science staffing company that can help you identify a pool of top-tier professionals for any role, even those with the most niche skill sets. If you've got a hard-to-fill vacancy or perhaps a project that requires a team of specialists, get in touch with us to discuss your requirements. Alternatively, you can download our e-book on how to drive engagement through your recruitment process, which has a detailed examination on interviewing life science candidates to ensure maximum productivity and commitment to your company.  <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '2a6fe3dc-c357-4095-b46f-69cb8c58ba43', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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