tolaini test

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Biotechnology, Permanent, Commercial Operations, Germany, Not Applicable
Location:

Berlin, Germany

Description

Weltmarktführer im Bereich Sterilisatoren und Reinigungs- und Desinfektionsgeräte.

Reference:

30860

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Biotechnology, Permanent, Biological Sciences, United Kingdom, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, England

Description

Two powerhouse pharmaceutical organisations have joined forced to forge a world leading centre in Cambridge, and they are looking for an experienced Senior Screening Scientist

Reference:

31052

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, All, Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, Permanent, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), United States, Production, Quality Assurance, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

El Segundo, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Technical Project Manager with a rapidly growing biopharmaceutical company located remotely.

Reference:

QA.AT.31059C

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, All, Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, Permanent, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), United States, Production, Quality Assurance, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Boulder, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Technical Project Manager with a rapidly growing biopharmaceutical company located remotely.

Reference:

QA.AT.31059B

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, All, Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, Permanent, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), United States, Production, Quality Assurance, Sales, Not Applicable
Location:

Philadelphia, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Technical Project Manager with a rapidly growing biopharmaceutical company located remotely.

Reference:

QA.AT.31059A

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Biological Sciences, Laboratory Technician, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Waukegan, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for an Animal Care Technician with a biopharmaceutical company located in Waukegan, IL.

Reference:

SC.DS.31034

Salary:

Highly Competitive Salary

Options All, Pharmaceuticals, Permanent, Analyst, Finance, Other, United States, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, USA

Description

Proclinical is currently recruiting for a Financial Analyst with a biotechnology company located in Cambridge, MA.

Reference:

AC.JJ.31036

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Biotechnology, Permanent, Commercial Operations, Singapore, Not Applicable
Location:

Singapore

Description

An opportunity has opened for an experienced Sales Manager in Life Sciences to join a Pharmaceutical company based in Singapore.

Reference:

31041

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Biotechnology, Permanent, Immunology, United Kingdom, Not Applicable
Location:

Cambridge, England

Description

Two powerful pharmaceutical organisations have joined forced to forge a world leading centre in Cambridge, and they are looking for a talented Cell Model Generation Scientist

Reference:

31032

Salary:

Highly Competitive

Options Biotechnology, Permanent, Medical Advisor, United Kingdom, Not Applicable
Location:

London, England

Description

A biotechnology company is looking for an experienced Medical Advisor to join their team in London.

Reference:

31029

Five things that life sciences companies always look for on your CV

There are many variables when it comes to the exact skill set that is required to fill any given vacancy, but there are certain desirable skills that are almost universally in demand by employers in the life sciences industry. Employers and recruiters have lots of applications for each position, so rarely spend more than a few seconds on each CV during initial selection. Most of this time is spent looking for specific skills and information in your employment history and education. Here we tell you what they are looking for so you can be sure to include it in your CV.  1. Experience working in a similar role Naturally, most life sciences companies will prefer a candidate who can hit the ground running, with minimum fuss or training. The more closely that your previous role matches the current vacancy, the easier employers will expect it to be for you, and for them, when you move. Assuming that you are not looking for a sideways career move, and that the positions you are applying for are above your current career level, highlight on your CV the achievements and duties that are most closely related to the role that you are targeting, as well as your transferable skills. 2. Length of time in the same role Recruiters often view the length of time with your current employer as an indication of whether you may be ready to move on, with two or more years considered an optimum time for them to approach you. Unless you are a contractor, employers will not want to take a risk on someone who has a history of spending only a short time with a companies before leaving. Jumping from job to job in this way raises questions about your level of commitment or ability to perform the role for which you were hired. Unless you can show a period of stability in your career history, consider staying in your current role for a little longer to open up greater opportunities for yourself in the long run. 3. Qualifications in relevant scientific disciplines Within the life sciences industry, candidates are usually expected to be educated to degree level, although MSc or even PhD level could be required, depending on the position. List your qualifications, starting with the highest attained or most recent. They might also look for qualifications that are relevant to the position such as Good Clinical Practice (GCP) or Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). 4. Languages you speak Most life sciences companies and recruiters will scan CVs for language skills. The industry is global and most of the world's largest pharmaceutical and medical devices companies have offices on several continents, so fluency in another language can be a distinct advantage. If this is part of your skill set make sure it’s clear on your CV. Your current location, desire to relocate, and other countries you have worked in should also be included.  5. Therapeutic areas and phases of study you have worked in Life sciences companies are interested in your level of experience working on specific therapeutic areas, such as oncology, neurology, immunology, etc. In medical affairs jobs for example, having specialist knowledge of the disease, specific patient groups and a network of key opinion leaders (KOLs) can hold a significant advantage. In clinical research jobs, there are important differences in the way that each phase of study is conducted and in the skills for interventional and non-interventional trials. Although skills can be transferable, hiring managers and recruiters usually look for CVs that show experience in the phase of study that is relevant to the position.  To find out more about what life sciences companies are looking for on your CV and increase the success rate of your job applications, check our our Guide to creating a successful CV.   <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '97bcc100-eed1-44cd-a03c-7ed9ba63db13', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->  

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How to get a medical science liaison job

Have you ever considered a career as a medical science liaison (MSL)? With the prominence of MSLs (also known as medical liaisons) on the rise, more and more companies are looking to hire these therapy experts. Breaking into a career as an MSL can be challenging as most roles require extensive experience. Here are some things to take into account if you’re looking to start a career as a medical science liaison in the pharmaceutical or medical devices industry.What is a medical science liaison? Put simply, an MSL is a subject matter expert. MSLs play an important role in any pharma, biotech or medical device company as they are responsible for interacting with the wider medical community. Their role is to inform and advise on upcoming advances in treatments. It is an MSL’s job to liaise with internal stakeholders (sales and marketing teams) to ensure that they promote an accurate and relevant message. MSLs are a non-commercial resource responsible for representing the company that they work for, making them vital to its success. They have advanced scientific training and concentrate on a specific disease or therapy area, for example oncology or cardiology. What are the responsibilities of a medical science liaison? MSLs are largely field-based and are usually responsible for an area or region. They will meet key opinion leaders (KOLs) such as physicians and will travel to visit key medical and academic institutions. During these liaisons, they will educate on their field of expertise and discuss relevant scientific and clinical data. It is important to highlight that the role of the MSL is not to sell the product. MSLs are not a commercial tool, their role is to effectively sell the science behind the product by advising and educating on a peer-to-peer level with doctors and KOLs. There is no sales pitch involved during their meetings with medical professionals. Instead, they bestow information about their therapy area/disease or the scientific background behind products. This could include communicating data from clinical trials that their company has conducted, describing the efficacy of a drug or device, or simply educating hospitals on advancing treatments within their area of expertise. Ways in which an MSL may educate a peer include responding to requests for information, hosting advisory boards and providing training to sales and marketing teams. A significant part of a MSL’s job is to keep abreast of scientific advancements in their field. This involves conducting their own research and attending conferences. What is the demand for medical science liaisons? The demand for MSLs is high as they play an extremely important role within any life science company. They are pivotal in establishing a solid network of hospitals, physicians and KOLs, which is fundamental to the company’s success. The more knowledgeable and competent the MSL, the more credible the company will appear. As the number of organisations who recognise their importance increases, so does the demand to hire MSLs. What qualifications or training do I need to get a medical science liaison job? MSLs are a point of scientific expertise and as such, they are required to possess advanced scientific/academic training. Most MSLs will come from three different backgrounds: Medical Doctor (MD), Pharmacist (PharmD) or PhD. It’s worth mentioning that the role demands that you are an excellent communicator with the ability to present complex scientific material in a clear and concise manner. . How do I get the right experience for a medical science liaison job? It can be tough to secure an MSL role without relevant work experience. Most applicants will already have the skills and qualifications for the job, so it is vital to differentiate yourself from others. Networking with those in the field is often key. Reaching out to recruiters, MSLs and medical managers on LinkedIn can be an effective way to gain information on when new roles will become available or be able to recommend someone who could support you with your search. Looking at company websites and tracking their careers page can also be useful. For entry level roles, most companies will not go through recruitment agencies so it’s beneficial to identify 10-15 companies that interest you and keep checking their websites to see if new opportunities arise. When applying you can also increase your chances of standing out by tailoring your CV to meet the requirements of the job description. Highlighting your relevant skills and expertise shows you really understand the requirements of the role. Always choose an MSL role suited to your background so that your expertise is directly transferable. If you have a PhD in oncology, apply for oncology MSL jobs to give yourself the best chance. When interviewing, ensure you have a detailed knowledge of the MSL role, so that you can confidently show how your skillset matches up. Demonstrating a sound knowledge of the role may help to counteract a lack of experience. Consider becoming a member of the MSLA (Medical Science Liaison Association) or MSLS (Medical Science Liaison Society). This can help you to build a network with experienced MSL professionals who may be able to help. Be resilient. Several companies will hire MSLs without experience, but it may take a few applications and interviews to find the right company for you. Each interview will prepare you better for the next, so remain positive! What are the different career paths you can take? Roles will vary from company to company but typically MSLs will have the opportunity to progress to a senior MSL role. With experience, MSLs also have the potential to become a medical manager or director. If MSLs no longer want to travel as much, they may consider moving to a more office-based career, for example a medical advisor role. Here are some examples of the directions you can take as an MSL: Example A: Has a PhD in oncology and is an expert in leukemia having worked in clinical research for a number of years. As a strong communicator with a passion for their therapy area, this career was a natural choice because of the scientific cross-over with their academic background. The individual hopes to assume an MSL manager position later in their career, as they would like the chance to be responsible for a small group of MSLs, ensuring that they are adequately trained in their therapy area and communicate the company’s medical strategy correctly during meetings and presentations. Example B: Worked for a few years as a medical science liaison within cardiology but is looking to move into a position that requires less travelling. With solid advisory experience and expertise behind them, this MSL is seeking to move into a medical advisor job. This is an office-based position involved in implementing the company’s medical strategy, assisting with the creation of medical marketing plans and working closely with the commercial team. Other possible career paths involve becoming a medical manager or medical director. If you’re already an MSL professional or looking to kick start your career in this field, have a look at Proclinical’s current medical science liaison opportunities to help you to find the right MSL job for you.  <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'b067d5a2-f614-49b3-add3-d906762f610a', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Steps to an effective job hunt in the life science industry

Finding the job you want in the life science industry can be tough due to very competitive landscape and only a small percentage of applicants even make it through to an interview. How can you increase your chances and make sure that you are one of them?  In this article, we've broken down the three main stages of finding a job – preparing, applying for, and securing the role – and give some pro tips to help you become a stand-out candidate. Have a look at each section to see how you can maximise your chances of getting the job you want. 1. Research and preparation This stage is mostly about ensuring that you are putting your best foot forward from the beginning. Life science jobs are competitive and you’ll have to beat a lot of other experienced candidates in the early stages of your application. Update Be sure to fully update your most recent experience any new skills you have gained in your current role. Taking time to showcase your key attributes helps busy HR personnel and hiring managers see immediately to what extent you are qualified for the job. This is a huge advantage as they are likely to skim read your CV/resume and if important information is not present or easily seen, this will affect your chances of getting an interview.   Customise  For highly specialist roles, of which there are so many in life sciences, there is nothing worse than a generic CV or resume. Each company is unique, working with different materials and technologies in various therapeutic areas. HR and hiring managers will want to see very specific examples of how your skills and experience will advance the technologies, specialisms and processes that drive their company. Filtering out irrelevant skills and experiences will streamline your CV and ensure you look like the ideal person for the job. Optimise  In this instance, we mean optimizing your application for the various technologies that it may pass through. Most likely an applicant tracking system (ATS). These highly efficient systems will scan through your CV/resume looking for pre-programmed key words and phrases that match the job description in question. If these keywords, phrases and acronyms aren’t written in a recognisable way you risk your key skills and experience not registering with the ATS, sending your application to the bottom of the pile. Over half of candidates are eliminated for a job via the ATS system if they don’t match the job description. Here are a few common CV/resume writing mistakes to avoid! Review your online presence: So much of the job hunting process happens online. That’s why it’s crucial to make sure that you are presenting yourself well on both job searching AND social media platforms. You can count on prospective employers googling you once they receive your job application or just before they reach out to you. Would you be happy with what comes up on your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc.? Either keep these social feeds free from appropriate pictures, a lot of bad language and ravings over sensitive subjects or take time to make them private! 70% of employers say that they turned down candidates because they discovered something negative or inappropriate online. LinkedIn Sometimes the best job come to you. Recruiters or a company’s talent acquisition may conduct their own searches and approach you with an opportunity. This saves you a lot of hassle of trolling through job sites/boards and almost guarantees you an interview. However, only the best candidates are approached like this. Aside from updating and optimising their CV, these professionals have taken care in creating and maintaining professional profiles. This could be their profile on a job board, or more likely - on LinkedIn. LinkedIn is a great way to broadcast the best bits of your CV/resume in a fully optimised profile that can be seen by an array of recruiters and employers. Most recruiters use social media to advertise job opportunities, and 70% of employers are using social networks to screen potential hires. 2. Applying for jobs Are you looking in the right places? Job boards Aside from the major job boards like Indeed, CareerBuilder and Monster there are a number of life science specific job boards that you may have come across. Some of the most prominent life science job boards include PharmiWeb, Emed, Biospace and of course and you’ll find a great deal of opportunities with us at Proclinical Staffing. To refine your job search even more, you can seek out job boards that are specific to your field or specialism. Applying directly It is thought that as many as 80% of jobs are not posted on industry job boards or social media. Therefore, you may gain advantage by making a list of companies you want to work for and contacting them directly. Networking Better yet, do some homework and work out who the key decision makers or hiring managers are in your field within your ideal company and begin networking with them. LinkedIn is a great tool for networking – another great reason to set up a profile. Generally, networking adds another string to your bow when searching for jobs that may not be publicly advertised. Here’s some top tips on how to network for jobs in the life science industry. Recruitment A proportion of jobs not advertised online will be assigned to recruitment and staffing companies to help companies find the specialist skills and experience they need. These specialist staffing agencies build up networks of these professionals to call upon when they match the job description. Bear in mind that if you are approached by a recruiter that the job may be exclusively available through their agency, so it is certainly worth considering. Finding a job through a recruitment company can also simplify your job hunt significantly and can increase your chances of being put forward for an interview. We’ve outlined a few reasons why you should consider using a specialist life science recruitment agency to enhance your job search.   3. Getting the job Once you’ve successfully made it to interview, it’s your chance to convince them you’re the best candidate. To actually get a job takes so much more than having the right qualifications and experience, and meeting your prospective employers in person is the opportunity to showcase everything else you can bring to the role. We could reel off a long list of what not to do in a life science interview but instead we’ve got some key points on what to expect, how to prepare and some important things to remember during the interview. Preparation is king Preparation should go beyond researching the company’s history and products. Spend time understanding their unique medicines, technologies, indications and therapies and what drives them to save and improve patients’ lives. It’s important to remember that this sense of purpose is an important part of what fuels the life science industry. To show an even wider understanding, be sure to research the current market (whether pharma, biotech, medical devices etc.). Try to identify trends and forces that may be influencing or causing changes in the market. Also, give the impression of being prepared by bringing along a copy of your CV/resume, a notepad to make notes, and even a few of your own pre-written notes to refer to during the interview. This may strike you as strange, but an interview is not an exam. Having some key points written down or even some questions you wanted to ask is a great way to stay on track and ensure you get all the information you need. Appearance and body language While your interviewer will certainly be looking for well thought out answers to questions, they’re also on the lookout for a professional appearance and composed body language. Some light-hearted pleasantries at the beginning of the interview won’t go amiss, adding to the impression that you are calm and collected. Remember not to talk over your interviewers, speak abruptly to any administrative staff before/after the interview and most importantly, avoid speaking about your previous employers in a negative light. Answering questions You can never know exactly which questions you are going to be asked, but preparing for common interview questions is a good start. Prepare answers around the specific therapy area or field of science that may be involved in the role you are applying for. Competency-based questions are common so it’s advisable to brush up on some frequently asked questions. It’s worth following the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) framework when preparing potential questions, and also in the moment when you’re answering.  A quick note on answering questions you’re not prepared for – try not to get flustered, instead taking a few moments to process and formulate something as relevant as possible. As a general rule, interviewers will appreciate a slight pause because launching into your answer as it shows that you are giving it due consideration instead of reeling off memorised answers. Asking questions Interviewers will expect you to have a few questions of your own. There is likely a lot information you will want to gather as you are also assessing whether the position is right for you. Asking considered, targeted questions shows you’re interested, engaged and focused on the company and role. Here’s some ideas on questions to ask before, during and after an interview! Going for a management role? Here’s some specific advice if you’re preparing for a management interview. We hope you've found these tips useful and that they help you make those small adjustments that make a big difference. There's no guarantees you'll suddenly get a flood of job offers, but we're confident that by following the advice in this blog, you'll start to get noticed by more employers and recruiters. Remember to stay positive and stay focussed, and if you encounter rejection, keep going! There are always more jobs in this industry. Did you find these tips useful? What other great advice on job hunting have you received recently? Let us know in the comments below.   <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '2a6fe3dc-c357-4095-b46f-69cb8c58ba43', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Proclinical Executive secures appointment of two C-level hires for Elixinol Global

Proclinical Executive secures two C-level hires for Elixinol Global

Proclinical Executive have assisted Elixinol Global (ASX: EXL; OTCQX: ELLXF) in securing the appointments of Oliver Horn to their international Board of Directors and Tom Siciliano as the organization's new CEO Americas. Australian-based Elixinol is a leading manufacturer of consumer healthcare products derived from hemp including CBD oil and CBD capsules, as well as the cultivation and manufacture of medicinal cannabis products. As the former CEO of vitamin giant, Swisse Wellness, Horn adds significant commercial knowledge and experience to Elixinol’s board and, just weeks on from his appointment, has stepped up from non-executive director to CEO of Elixinol Global, effective immediately.  Chairman and founder, Paul Benhaim, expects the appointment of Horn as CEO to position Elixinol to lead within the global cannabis and hemp industry. "Since Oliver joined the board earlier this month, it became apparent that he could create immense value in a leadership position. He is a natural people leader, has great commercial acumen, and brings well needed global experience to the role." Benhaim said. In a statement, Horn expressed his excitement at joining Elixinol and outlined his vision for its future growth, "It is a privilege to have the opportunity to lead Elixinol’s very capable global team and build on 20+ years of experience in the global hemp industry. I chose to join Elixinol Global because it has an outstanding reputation for quality, transparency and efficacy. We are in the enviable position of being in a long-term global growth category, with a good brand, and strong market reach. My vision is to build a branded global consumer products business, built on a very positive culture which does good for people and the planet. I will be driving an agile and transparent business, that is at the forefront of innovation.” Siciliano is charged with leading Elixinol's refined strategy on hemp derived CBD in the Americas region. He has an extensive background in the cannabis industry as former president of Nutritional High International Inc. a vertically integrated cannabis manufacturing and distribution company, and as President and Chief Financial Officer for Canna Security America, where he turned the company into the second largest security company within the cannabis industry. "I am incredibly excited about the opportunity to join the Elixinol team and work to grow the reach of our CBD products," Siciliano said. "I believe in this industry, and the importance cannabis plays in health and wellness and our regional economy." Proclinical Executive, who partnered with Elixinol for its leadership search, are global life sciences executive search specialists with a strong track record of helping high-growth businesses in the sector to secure senior leadership appointments. About Elixinol Elixinol Global Limited (ASX:EXL; OTC:ELLXF) is a global leader in the hemp derived CBD industry, innovating, manufacturing and selling hemp derived CBD products. The Company’s simplified business model is focusing on: In the Americas, innovating, manufacturing and selling high quality Elixinol branded hemp derived CBD products based in Colorado, USA In Europe & UK, educating and selling high quality Elixinol branded and co-branded hemp derived CBD products based in Amsterdam, The Netherlands In Australia, providing stronger unified planning and support across the group to enable the various regional offices to focus on operational strategy and execution through its Global Executive Office based in Sydney, Australia Across the Rest of World, expanding distribution of Elixinol branded hemp derived CBD products through reputable distributors as key markets open. About Proclinical Executive Proclinical Executive specialises in global life sciences executive search, bringing together innovative search methods and a refined, scientific approach to engage tomorrow’s leaders. Whether you are building leadership teams to expand your market presence in new territories, or need to locate and mobilize the very best people with rare, niche skill-sets to drive your business forward, our Executive Search division specializes in installing senior appointments that help you grow!

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Large Global MedTech, Interventional Radiology

Large Global MedTech, Interventional Radiology Case study EU growth plan We partnered with a large global medical technology company to support them in becoming the market leaders within interventional radiology. The Challenge Our partner needed to scale up their commercial team in Germany by making 5 hires and were also looking for 2 Distribution Managers for a new business unit they had acquired from another large medical technology company. This is a very niche area to recruit into, therefore we proposed an exclusive solution to find the best talent for them within the market. The Solution As a business, we already have a large existing network of professionals that we could reach out to. In addition, through our yearly attendance to conferences including Linc and the European Congress of Radiology, we continue to build that network and therefore already have a large presence within the Medical Technology industry. We were working exclusively on this project and therefore we were able to manage one positive message into the market about our partner. We shortlisted 5 CV’s for each role, whereby 3 were taken through for each role for face to face interviews. This led to all placements being successfully made. The Outcome By our partner trusting us to work on this project exclusively, we were able to make placements into all available roles. We promoted one message into the marketplace about our partner and therefore we were able to maintain their positive company profile. As our partner’s team continues to expand and grow, they have committed to working with us going forward on future projects.

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Proclinical office at Chesterford Research Park near Cambridge UK

Proclinical Launches UK Satellite Office at Chesterford Research Park

London, UK – 16 March 2020 Global life sciences recruitment and consulting business, Proclinical, announced the launch of its latest new office this week, located at Chesterford Research Park, less than 20km from the historic city of Cambridge. Proclinical’s new satellite office, which will supplement its London HQ, is ideally positioned to service the Cambridge life sciences and MedTech cluster. The team will operate under the Proclinical Executive brand, focussed on fulfilling executive and senior level search appointments for early stage, growth stage and SMEs across all areas of life sciences, and work closely with the Proclinical Staffing team in the capital to supply permanent and contract recruitment solutions. Already firmly established as a market leader in the UK and US, the specialist staffing firm have launched offices in various global science hubs including Shanghai, Tokyo, Los Angeles, Melbourne and Sydney in recent months. They will join a variety of established and early-stage pharma, biotech and technology research and development companies at the 250-acre parkland facility near Cambridge, including Arecor, AstraZeneca, Cambridge Epigenetix, Lonza, Microbiotica, Isogenica and Camena Bioscience. Director, Iain Hopper remarked, “Cambridge is a world-class life science hub, making it an obvious strategic interest for Proclinical, which continues to expand to meet the increasing demand of our partners across the industry. Despite the abundance of talent in the area, our partners aren’t always able to recruit locally, so as truly global life sciences specialists, we're uniquely placed to unearth and mobilise people with the experience and niche skillsets they are looking for from all over the world. From these superb new facilities, we are able to expand our UK and global operations to support our partners’ continued growth as well as our own.” Chesterford Research Park is home to scientists, investors and entrepreneurs working side by side, developing life-changing drugs within a sustainable environment. About Proclinical As Global Growth Partners, Proclinical provides a unique proposition; delivering on every stage of the life science process to help individuals, teams and whole organizations reach their goals faster. Through our suite of services – Proclinical Staffing, Proclinical Executive, Proclinical Consulting and Proclinical Engage – we help you to grow so that you can bring about a positive impact on global health. To contact Proclinical’s new Cambridge office, please email Ian Hopper i.hopper@proclinical.com.

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How to prepare for a video interview

How to prepare for a video interview

Life sciences organisations have grown to embrace the ease and accessibility of online tools and technologies to connect with applicants and video conferencing has completely changed the landscape in which recruiters and hiring managers can assess candidates for vacant roles. At Proclinical, our experience of facilitating video interviews is that they are an extremely efficient way for businesses, in a global industry such as ours, to assess candidates. They are particularly effective for first-stage assessments, before inviting shortlisted individuals to travel from afar to meet face-to-face – saving time and money for the interviewer and interviewee alike. Video interviews can either be live or prerecorded – which is very convenient for aligning schedules, particularly when applicants are in different time zones. Just as with any other type of interview, applicants need to properly prepare for a video call if you are going to stand out against other candidates. This includes conducting mock interviews, ensuring that your technical equipment is properly setup, and managing your non-verbal cues which will be at the forefront during interviews of this nature. Use these 10 tips to ensure you make a great impression in your next video interview: 1. Check your internet connection in advance A poor internet connection can make or break the success of your interview. It is always best to have your computer physically connected to your internet router. If you’re relying on Wi-Fi, then you have to be prepared for the unexpected, so have a back-up plan, such as connecting to your phone’s 4G signal. The ideal connection speed for a video interview is 10Mbps or higher. If you’re not sure what speed your computer is you can test your connection beforehand by using a site such as Ookla. 2. Get some privacy If you are at home for your video interview, be sure to inform others who may be in the house not to disturb you. If you have young children or pets at home, ask a friend or partner to supervise them during the call if possible. Set your phone to ‘do not disturb’ and lock the door if you can. While you might get sympathy from some interviewers, others consider interruptions or background commotion to be unprofessional. Worse is that it can completely throw you off your game. An embarrassing distraction can leave you flustered and unable to think clearly about your responses, severely impacting your performance and your chances of getting the job. 3. Use a headset Using a headset during a video interview is recommended but not mandatory. Although your webcam or laptop may have a built-in microphone, it is likely to pick up more ambient or background noise than a headset. Furthermore, built-in microphones may not carry your voice as clearly as you would like, which can affect your interviewer’s ability to clearly understand your responses to their questions during the interview. When in doubt, plug in your headset. 4. Choose a plain background Don’t let the informal setting of a video interview fool you – your background is also a very important factor. It is always better to have a neutral or plain background to avoid any distractions and keep the interviewer’s focus on you. Avoid having any posters, photos, mirrors, laundry or a pile of clutter in plain sight. If you’re conducting the video interview on a desktop and you can’t do much about certain background elements, then simply use an inexpensive screen or a solid colour curtain as a disguise. 5. Dress to impress It goes without saying that you have to present yourself in the same professional manner you would if your interview was in-person. Always dress appropriately, avoiding any bright colours or patterns that might be distracting on camera. Avoid flashy jewellery and overdone makeup, and keep your hair simple but professional. 6. Position your webcam Laptops often have integrated webcams above the screen, but when placed on a desk or table, the camera position can be too low, and it can feel to your interviewer as though they are having to look up at you. Simply place your laptop on top of something like a box or stack of books so its camera is positioned slightly above your eye-line. If you are using a free-standing webcam, simply place it on top of something behind your screen so that the built-in camera is similarly aligned. 7. Make eye contact You already know the importance of making strong eye contact during an interview, but don’t underestimate how that comes across on video. When we talk to others, we have a natural tendency to concentrate on their face. The problem is that if the person’s face is located away from your webcam, then it will appear on-screen as though you are either looking up or down rather than directly at the person. Instead, simply move the window with the recruiter’s video image as close as possible to your webcam to enable you to maintain proper eye-contact. 8. Maintain good posture Having good posture applies whether the interview is in-person or online. Because you’re on video, your interviewer will probably not see the lower part of your body; however, you still want to make sure that you’re sitting up straight with both feet planted firmly on the ground. Try to avoid showing side angle and always make sure that your chair is properly adjusted so that you don’t appear too high or too low. 9. Be aware of your body language You want to come across as friendly and approachable – and a warm and confident smile will do the trick. But you don’t want to come across as overly enthusiastic or nervous by smiling or laughing at every word that the other person says. The key here is moderation. Use your smile to project confidence and enthusiasm without overdoing it. Keep in mind that every movement you make during a video interview becomes more magnified on-screen. If you tend to use a lot of hand gestures, play with your hair or cover your mouth when you get nervous then make a concentrated effort to avoid these distractions during your interview. 10. Practice A great way to identify your nervous tendencies is to practise by recording yourself multiple times and watching videos back to observe your own behaviours. The more time that you spend conducting mock interviews, whether it be on video or in front of your mirror, the more comfortable you will become. Be sure you also know your CV inside and out and practice your answers to competency-based interview questions that you are likely to face. Although there is no sure-fire way to ensure everything runs smoothly during your video interview, these tips can certainly help you to put your best self forward. Let us know your tips and experience of video interviews in the comments below. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, '2a6fe3dc-c357-4095-b46f-69cb8c58ba43', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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Critical dual hire of CEO - Americas and Board Member

Critical dual hire of CEO - Americas and Board Member Case study The Challenge We partnered with the founder and CEO of leading global consumer healthcare manufacturer in Australia to find a high-level board member with extensive commercial expertise. Subsequently, we were also assigned an urgent and critical hire of their CEO for the Americas, as the incumbent CEO had left at short notice. The Solution We were able to leverage our extensive global network of consumer healthcare specialists to source the highly experienced C-Level candidates that our partner required. The Proclinical Executive team introduced a very capable and experienced C-Suite candidate to our partner for the CEO Americas role, who was successfully appointed with an immediate start date. We also assisted our partner in hiring a highly regarded industry CEO to their Board of Directors, adding significant commercial knowledge and experience in consumer health from a global background. The Outcome Through this partnership, we have supported our partner to continue their international growth with strong leadership, while demonstrating our expertise in assisting global businesses with appointments at the highest level.

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Claire Perry Interview - What it means to be a female leader today

Claire Perry: What it means to be a female leader today

Claire Perry joined Proclinical as a Senior Partner for Proclinical Executive and Vice President of Proclinical US, San Francisco in 2019. In this spotlight interview, Claire sheds light on what she believes it takes to be a successful female leader in the recruitment industry. Claire started her recruitment career in London when she was having trouble making ends meet as a teacher and decided to put herself on the other side of the equation and to work for one of the agencies who were sending her out to schools. She didn’t join a teaching agency but instead secured a position at a boutique IT recruitment agency. Claire was the first woman on the sales floor and within 18 months was the top performer. She then moved to San Diego, CA as the third hire for a leading recruitment company with an objective to build the engineering division and grow the medical device space for the business. In her second year she contributed over 60% of revenue for the entire permanent division and helped grow the office to 28 people in three years. In 2017 Claire was named as a top performer out of 500 consultants in the US. Claire then moved to San Francisco with a start-up agency to help them establish their US footprint, she built a team and billed over $1M in her first full year. Here’s what Claire herself had to say about what it means to be a female leader today: What would you put your success down to? I had some great mentors early on in my career, they took time and patience to teach me how to recruit in one of the world’s most competitive and saturated markets. I owe them a great deal of gratitude. I’ve been part of great teams and have learned something from everyone with whom I’ve had the pleasure of working. Looking inward, the qualities I’ve called forth most in recruitment have been pride, resilience, courage and compassion. I feel good at the end of the day when I’ve done the absolute best job for my clients. When I get knocked down, I get back up, every time, and when fear appears, I stand taller and take another step toward it. As for compassion, everyone has things going on in their lives, it’s good to be understanding when people need you to be, they’ll remember you for it!   What is one characteristic that you believe every leader should possess whether they be male or female?  Integrity is very important, it makes people feel safe, valued and respected. Integrity creates an environment of trust which is key to building a strong team who can share and work together without unnecessary fear. I action integrity by telling the truth, being fair, treating everyone like they are special, valuing everyone’s input, addressing issues quickly and directly and then letting them go, giving people a clean slate every morning no matter what happened the day before (because it's already been dealt with), and speaking up when everyone else is staying quiet. What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career? It’s important to lead by example. I don’t ask my team to do anything I wouldn’t do. What advice would you give the next generation of female leaders? Support other females in the workplace. I recently heard a story about a female HR leader who refused to grant a manager’s request for a woman’s pay increase, but she granted one to a male on that same manager’s team. The manager told me that he was disappointed because the woman was a better performer than the male. He said this was the first time he'd really seen a woman holding another woman back in the workplace. As women, we’ve been conditioned by society for hundreds of years to compete with each other for survival but that’s not the way it needs to be any more, and people are slowly waking up to that. We can become conscious of when we’re competing rather than supporting, pause and make the decision to change, then shift our behaviour. It may feel unnatural at first, but stay open to it, keep trying, and I promise you’ll feel more whole, more connected and much happier. By encouraging, supporting and helping each other we not only teach others how to treat us but, we can pass down the gift of our knowledge to the next generation. What inspiring women have you met in the recruitment industry?I met a woman who was so broke that, for her interview, she bought a three-dollar suit from a charity shop. She came into the office to interview, leaned across the table and with determination in her eyes said she’d be just fine to join a sales floor of twenty men. Within a year she was flying her family overseas for a vacation. I met another woman who, struck with cancer lying on her death bed, decided that if she made it back to health, she’d do what she’d always wanted to do and become a recruiter. Now she’s very successful. I meet many women who throw themselves into the gladiator ring of recruitment with both fear and courage, but they take direction, keep showing up, and go on to completely transform their lives. At Proclinical, we are delighted to celebrate Claire’s achievements and the many other talented, successful women employed by the company globally. If you are seeking to join a diverse business that will fully support your career aspirations, consider applying to work for Proclinical. We have a range of recruitment consultant jobs available at all levels, as well as management and director positions. 

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The 10 most influential women in the history of medicine | Proclinical

The 10 most influential women in the history of medicine

Often in the face of prejudice and discrimination, many women over the centuries have made outstanding medical contributions, and continue to do so today. Throughout history, women were largely excluded from the realms of science and medicine, except for nursing or midwifery, but there are some rare exceptions of women in medicine, tracing back to ancient times. The mid-1850s marked a turning point in society’s view towards women working in science and medicine, although they would still struggle to be seen as equals for the next hundred or so years.  Here is Proclinical’s list, celebrating some of history’s most influential women in life sciences and their extraordinary achievements and contributions that have saved countless lives and continue to inspire generations of women in medicine to this day. Metrodora (c. 200-400 AD) Metrodora, a Greek female physician, wrote On the Diseases and Cures of Women, the oldest medical text known to be written by a woman. Notably, it did not include information on obstetrics, the study of childbirth, which was extremely rare in a time when women were restricted to gynaecology and midwifery. However, Metodora is known to have covered all areas of medicine related to women, developing various therapies and surgical techniques that were revolutionary in her time. She was heavily influenced by the work of Greek physician Hippocrates, and her work has influenced and been referenced by many other physician writers throughout history. Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910) British-born Elizabeth Blackwell is best known as the first woman to earn an medical degree (MD) in the US. She was raised in a forward-thinking, socially active family. Her father was a passionate advocate for the abolition of slavery, and her siblings went on to campaign for women’s rights. After facing rejection from several universities, Blackwell was finally accepted to Geneva Medical College in 1847. She received hostility from her fellow students at first, eventually earning their respect and graduating first in her class in 1849. In 1857, she opened the New York Infirmary for Women and Children along with her sister, Dr Emily Blackwell (the third woman to earn an MD) and Dr Marie Zakrzewska. Blackwell played an important role in both the United States and the United Kingdom as a social awareness and moral reformer, and promoted education for women in medicine through her inspirational book Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women.  Marie Curie (1867-1934) Polish mathematician and scientist Marie Curie collaborated with her husband, Pierre, to discover two chemical elements in the periodic table: polonium and radium. This important work observed that there was a relationship between radioactivity and the heavy elements of the periodic table, and led to much advancement in medicine. Most notably, it led the way to the development of the x-ray, which allowed internal imagery to be used for diagnosis without the need for open surgery, and radiation therapy for treating cancer. During WWI, Marie and her daughter Irene brought mobile X-Ray machines and radiology units to the front line, which allowed more than a million wounded soldiers to be treated.Curie earned a Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903, and yet another in Chemistry in 1911, the first and only woman to have been honoured twice. The Curie Institute in Paris, she founded in 1920, is still a major cancer research facility today. Gerty Cori (1896-1957) Another Nobel Prize winner, Gerty Cori, earned the prestigious award for her work in medicine/physiology in 1947. Cori was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize in this category. She worked with her husband, Carl Ferdinand Cori, with whom she shared an interest in preclinical science, to prove vital concepts in genetics. Their work led to the discovery that an enzyme deficiency could be responsible for metabolism disorders. They also carried out multiple studies on the action of hormones, focusing on the pituitary gland. Over her lifetime, Gerty won several other awards in recognition for her contributions to science and earned honorary Doctor of Science degrees from Boston University, Smith College, Yale, Columbia and Rochester between 1948 and 1955. Virginia Apgar (1909-1974) Virginia Apgar is famous for her invention of the Apgar score, a vital test that was quickly adopted by doctors to test whether newborn babies required urgent medical attention. The Apgar score is responsible for reducing infant mortality rates considerably and is still used today to assess the clinical condition of newborns in the first few minutes of life. Apgar was the first woman to become a full professor at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Gertrude Belle Elion (1918-1999) American chemist Gertrude "Trudy" Belle Ellion shared a Nobel Prize with George H Hitchins and Sir James Black for innovative methods of rational drug design which focused on understanding the target of the drug rather than simply using trial and error. Coming from a scientific background, Elion was inspired to pursue medicine when her grandfather passed away from cancer when she was 15 and became dedicated to discovering a cure for the disease. Using the methods she had designed, Elion and her team developed a staggering 45 patents, including drugs to combat leukemia, herpes, AIDS and treatments to reduce the body's rejection of foreign tissue in kidney transplants between unrelated donors.  Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) British scientist Rosalind Franklin is best known for her work in understanding the structure of DNA, using x-ray photographs to solve its complexities. Her identification of the double helix has led to huge advances in the field of genetics and modern medicine. Franklin also led pioneering work on the molecular structures of RNA viruses and Polio. Franklin had a passion for science from an early age and decided to become a scientist at the age of 15. She fought against her father’s reluctance to let her undertake higher education and graduated from Cambridge University in 1941. She worked for many years as a first-rate scientist and were it not for her untimely death from cancer in 1958, it is highly likely that she would have shared Nobel Prizes in both 1962 and 1982 for work that she had a huge role in during her lifetime.   Rosalyn Yalow (1921-2011) America  medical physicist Rosalyn Yalow received the Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine in 1977 for the development of the radioimmunoassays (RIA) technique, which is used to measure peptide hormones in the blood. Yalow’s diagnostic technique was so precise that it was used to scan blood donations for infectious diseases such as HIV and hepatitis. This was fundamental in ensuring life-saving blood transfusions were safe and effective. Later, the method allowed scientists to prove that type-2 diabetes is caused by the body not being able to use insulin properly. Patricia Goldman-Rakic (1937-2003) Neuroscientist Patricia Goldman-Rakic is recognised for her studies of the brain, particularly, the frontal lobes and how it relates to memory. She gained her bachelor’s degree in Neurology from Vassar in 1959, and then her doctorate from the University of California in Developmental Psychology in 1963. Her multidisciplinary research significantly contributed to the understanding of neurological diseases such as dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s and her study of dopamine and its effects on the brain is essential to modern day understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Francoise Barré-Sinoussi (born 1947) Parisian scientist Francoise Barré-Sinoussi is a celebrated for her discovery of HIV as the cause of the immunodeficiency disease, AIDS. In 2008, Barré, along with Luc Montaigner, discovered that the HIV retrovirus attacked lymphocytes, a blood cell that plays an important role in the body’s immune system. Her vital work has helped millions of people who are HIV-positive to live long, healthy lives, and could pave the way for a cure in the near future. This is by no means an exhaustive list of notable women in medicine. You can find many more recognised by STEM Women, alongside others from the wider field of science and technology.  Which women in medicine have inspired you? Let us know in the comments below. <!--HubSpot Call-to-Action Code --> hbspt.cta.load(321476, 'b067d5a2-f614-49b3-add3-d906762f610a', {}); <!-- end HubSpot Call-to-Action Code -->

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